Ingham County's general election voting history has been a shade of blue for a while now

Print More

By Andrew Merkle
Ingham County Chronicle Staff Reporter

A lot can be learned during an election year. After looking at Ingham County’s voting history ahead of the March 8 Michigan primary, one would learn that the county overwhelmingly supports candidates of the Democratic Party.

Ingham County voters have historically and overwhelmingly supported Democratic candidates.

Ingham County voters have historically and overwhelmingly supported Democratic candidates.

Democratic candidates have won the county in each general election dating back to 2004, according to POLITICO.

That’s right. The Republican Party is 0-for-7 in Ingham County going back to President George W. Bush’s reelection in 2004. That includes three presidential elections and four senate races.

President Obama defeats Republican challenger Gov. Mitt Romney in Ingham County in 2012. *denotes incumbent candidate

President Obama defeats Republican challenger Gov. Mitt Romney in Ingham County in 2012.
*denotes incumbent candidate

Most of the elections have not been close either. The smallest margin of defeat is owned by Bush in 2004 when he lost to Sen. John Kerry by more than 16 percentage points: 57.8 percent to 41.1 percent.

The largest margin of victory came in the 2008 senate race between Democratic candidate Carl Levin and Republican Jack Hoogendyk. Levin won overwhelmingly, receiving 71.1 percent of the votes.

Another trend you will see in the charts is that voter turnout is currently trending downward in the county during a time where the population is growing, according to the United States Census Bureau.

Senate races are one sided in Ingham County despite the decrease in voter turnout since 2008.

Senate races are one sided in Ingham County despite the decrease in voter turnout since 2008.

What could be causing this trend?

One possible factor is the relative age of Ingham County’s citizens. According to “Boundless Political Science,” younger populations tend to produce fewer voters than populations with more old people.

Data from the United States Census Bureau shows that Ingham County has a lower percentage of persons aged 65 and older than the state average. This could partly explain the decrease in voter turnout.

Comments are closed.