Delhi Township applies for art grant

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By Marina Petz
Holt Journal staff writer

The Delhi Charter Township Board of Trustees passed a Public Art Policy during its Feb. 18th meeting that allowed the township to apply for a grant to help improve art throughout the community.

“Art can be any type of form,it is in the eye of the beholder.” said Delhi Township Trustee John Hayhoe. “Voting this policy in got the board members excited, we can form a committee and see about different things we can do to spruce up the community.”

“Art can be any type of form,it is in the eye of the beholder.” said Delhi Township Trustee John Hayhoe. “Voting this policy in got the board members excited, we can form a committee and see about different things we can do to spruce up the community.”

“Holt just recently found out that it was available, but we had to have an ordinance,” said Township Trustee John Hayhoe. “One of the things your community has to have is some type of ordinance that mandates that you can accept these type of grants, and we didn’t.”

The approval of the policy allowed Delhi to submit an application to receive funding from the Lansing Economic Area Partnership (LEAP.) If approved, the grant will provide Holt with $10,000 for the statue that will be placed in front of the farmers market. There are currently no artist or design planned for the sculpture.

“The farmers market is a physical location that already embodies the township’s sense of itself as a community,” said Tracy Miller, director of the Department of Community Development for Delhi Charter Township. “Adding a public sculpture at that location will only add to this feeling.”

The policy includes seven goals including integrating public art into new community facilities, and using public art to express Delhi’s history and cultural heritage.

“Arts and culture play an important part in transforming a place, making it attractive to business, workers and residences,” said Treasurer Roy Sweet. “I would like to see artwork that can be enjoyed for many years and has some historical significance.”

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