High school S.E.T. students prepare for The Great Divide

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By Jennifer Swanchara
Meridian Times staff writer

The rivalry between Michigan State University and the University of Michigan is no longer only on the football field, as the Great Divide is between the Okemos and Pittsfield Home Depots’.

Pat Hepfer and his S.E.T student prepare for The Great Divide.

Pat Hepfer and his S.E.T student prepare for The Great Divide.

The event includes a DeWalt drilling contest, appearances by the MSU cheer team, East Lansing and Williamston High School marching bands and a car-cutting contest performed by the Meridian Township Fire Department.

What the audience of the Okemos competition may not realize is the event is furnished by Ingham County high school students enrolled in the Students in Entertainment Technology program.

S.E.T instructor Pat Hepfer said his students could set up the event better than The Home Depot used to and has been doing it ever since.

“For us to work with substantial national companies such as DeWalt and The Home Depot on a pretty personal level through this event we’re able to see as a client what they need,” said Hepfer.

“Going up to the event the students don’t know what to expect, so I try and lay it all out for them but this is one of their favorite things they do throughout the year.”

As one of the two second-year S.E.T students, Emily Fulton said she has been trying to encourage everyone because they have a lot of work to do.

Matt Washburn and Kyle White fix The Great Divide stage.

Matt Washburn and Kyle White fix The Great Divide stage.

“We set up the staging so they can bring people on stage, we set up the sound system so they have fantastic music and we set up all the lighting for the stage,” said Fulton.

First-year S.E.T student Cailey Sanchez said she is most looking forward to, “Setting up and then sitting back and watching people go ‘Wow, that’s really cool that high school students did that’.”

According to Hepfer, the S.E.T program allows Meridian Township students to receive 13 credits and a certificate of completion through Lansing Community College for free.

Hepfer said the community often doesn’t know the program exists, so it is nice to receive positive feedback for their work during The Great Divide.

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