Drop-in Lego Club becoming increasingly popular

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By RuAnne Walworth
Williamston Post staff writer

Legos lying on the table designed for older kids at Williamston Community Library's Drop-in Lego Club.

Legos lying on the table designed for older kids at Williamston Community Library’s Drop-in Lego Club.

Williamston Community Library’s events and clubs bring together the library workers and community members through friendship and fun. Drop-in Lego Club, a fairly recent addition to the library, is one of its’ attractions for younger community members.

“I remember there was a day where we had a group of people come in and ask for the Lego club at the library, but we didn’t have one,” librarian Becky Langham said. “So then Julie, our head librarian, thought we should start a Lego club here for the Williamston community.”

Attendance with the Lego club varies throughout the year, but seems to be a bigger hit during the school year, Langham said. The average attendance can vary from two to six, but can jump to 29, as it did two weeks ago.

“Lego programs have been around various libraries for a long time,” library assistant Jackie McDonald said. “We started doing the club once a month, but now that we have more people coming, we have it every other week during the school year.”

The Lego club has collected a wide variety of Legos from kits, including larger Legos for younger children to play with. The Legos are owned by the library, according to McDonald. Friends of the library have also donated money to help purchase kits, which has given the library a chance to buy kits such as the new Lego Friends targeted more toward young girls.

A Lego Statue of Liberty displayed in the room of the  Drop-in Lego Club, donated to the Williamston Community Library.

A Lego Statue of Liberty displayed in the room of the Drop-in Lego Club, donated to the Williamston Community Library.

According to the Lego club flyer, playing with building toys helps children develop the skills they need to be good readers. Lego club might also help develop other skill sets such as communication and interacting.

“I’ve never seen a kid be greedy, they always share,” McDonald said. “If someone is looking for a blue Lego, they all stop and look for one. Legos is serious business for them.”

After building their creations, the Legos remain intact for another two weeks until the next Drop-in Lego Club and go on display in the library for all to see, McDonald said.

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