Sexual objectification: Is it a problem? How do we solve it?

EAST LANSING, Mich. — During Halloween in 2016, Sharon Thomas, a human biology major at University of Michigan, was walking through the neighborhood of Cedar Village around 8 p.m. when a man called her from across the street. “He said, ‘Hey, baby, you look fine,’ then he ran over to me from across the road,” said Thomas.  “I didn’t really register what he was doing at the moment.”

Thomas said the man ran up to her and grabbed her waist while complimenting her. She pushed him away physically, but she couldn’t get him out of her mind.

Can women fight?

A hot topic during this election year, politicians, active military personnel and veterans alike have opinions on women in combat.

Powerful women: a herstory

Women have overcome obstruction on their way to leadership positions, but plenty of obstacles still exist for women pursuing those roles. Hillary Clinton’s loss in the 2016 presidential election could be considered the ultimate heartbreak in a career of service and fighting to break through a glass ceiling of leadership opportunities, but her campaign for the presidency changed women’s history no matter the outcome. Meet other women, primarily from Michigan, who have also made contributions to women’s history and broke through barriers to achieve in many different fields of work.

#OurVoteCounts: Getting millennial women registered this election

If every millennial woman voted, there would be a huge voting bloc in this election, said Katherine Mirani, news editor at Her Campus. According to the Center for American Women and Politics, 64 percent of women reported voting in the 2012 election. But of those voters, only 45 percent of women age 18-24 voted, compared to 61 percent of voters age 24-44, 70 percent of voters age 45-64 and 73 percent of voters age 65-74. “We have a lot of power as young women,” said the editor, 24, from Boston, “but we have to actually use it.”

On Sept. 27, Her Campus – a new-media brand for empowered college women based in Boston, Mass.

Lansing lacking in giving domestic abuse victims a place to sleep

By Ella Kovacs
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

Domestic violence and relationship abuse happens all over the world, the United States, and Michigan. In big cities like Lansing, where there are many people in a concentrated area, it is vital for victims and survivors to have access–preferably easy access–to resources that will help and support them. For many women, the first resource they would think of is the police. But victims also need a place to sleep. Ruth Sternaman, a counselor at the Women’s Center of Greater Lansing, said that in the Lansing area, housing assistance for victims could be improved as well as child protective services.

Michigan Women’s Historical Center showcases great accomplishments of women across the state

By Kevyn Collier-Roberts
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

“Every woman here is an inspiration,” said Caitlyn Perry Dial, the museum director at the Michigan Women’s Historical Center & Hall of Fame. Michigan Women’s Historical Center & Hall of Fame is a hidden gem here in the Lansing area. The museum showcases the many historical accomplishments of Michigan women, both deceased and alive. In the museum each woman being acknowledged has her own plaque on the wall with a few paragraphs briefly explaining her remarkable story. On June 10, 1987, the Michigan Women’s Historical Center & Hall of Fame was dedicated to the public.

Lansing welcomes Women’s Premiere Soccer League franchise

By Jaylyn Galloway
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

“I play soccer, because I like working on a team to achieve a common goal,” Jackie Baratta, a Lansing resident, said. It is important for girls to play sports to not only get the team experience — which will be important for school projects as well as future work experiences — it is also good mentally and physically, Baratta said. The sentiment of girls getting involved in sports is shared among the Lansing community as a new addition has been made to the Hope Sports Complex/ hill SBC Soccer Club. The club will now have a semi-professional Women’s Premier Soccer League (WPSL) team. “We stopped after high school, now we continue for serious players in the womens’ soccer league,” Julie Mullin, general manager of the complex and owner of the Chill SBC Soccer Club said.

Women are largest growing group of entrepreneurs

By STEPHANIE HERNANDEZ McGAVIN
The Capital News Service
LANSING — The largest-growing segment of entrepreneurs in the U.S. is minority women, according to the 2015 State of Women-Owned Business Report, a report commissioned by American Express. While some women may not go through college in search of entrepreneurial success, their changing life experiences or personal influences may shape their decisions later on. LeCathy Burston, director of membership and corporate development at the Great Lakes Women’s Business Enterprise Council in Livonia, said women tend to expand their perceptions based on changing life courses. “What I have found is that women evolve into business,” Burst said. “There are very few women that say, ‘Well when I get out of college I’m going to build a logistical or manufacturing company.’ They evolve into it from husbands, fathers, divorces or job challenges.”
Additionally, Burst said being a second-generation business owner gives women the confidence and wisdom to be entrepreneurs in their own fields.

More women turning to agriculture, experts say

By SIERRA RESOVSKY
Capital News Service
LANSING – With Michigan’s food and agriculture system supporting more than 920,000 jobs, 24,795 of those workers operate farms as their primary occupation. Now things are taking a turn in this predominantly and traditionally male field. There are almost one million female farmers in the U.S., and Michigan alone saw a 17.6 percent increase in women in agriculture between 2007 and 2014 according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Shakara Tyler, an undeserved farmer development specialist at Michigan State University, said that although women have always been key players on family farms, now they are the fastest-growing farming population in the country. And they’re finally receiving recognition for their work.