The Williamston 2017 Homecoming Parade advances community involvement

WILLIAMSTON- From student groups and athletes, to community members and ministries, this year’s Williamston Homecoming parade had something for everyone.The parade took place Oct. 6 before Williamston High School competed against the Fowlerville Gladiators at their home field. The parade route began at St. Mary’s Church on North Cedar Street at 6 p.m. and finished at the gates of the Larkin-Nortman Memorial Field right before the game began. The parade featured many important teams and organizations within the community.

The college admission SAT test has been redesigned

By Kelsey Clements
The Williamston Post

The PSAT and SAT have been redesigned as of this year. The new test will be scored differently than the previous SAT. Before, students were deducted points for every wrong question. Now, students will only be scored for correct answers. There is no punishment for guessing on a question, so students must strategically take the test in a different way.

McCormick Park getting makeover this spring

The Williamston Post
Caitlin DeLuca

McCormick Park will be undergoing serious updates this spring. The plan, which can be found on the city of Williamston’s website, outlines the six pieces that will be upgraded and six pieces that will be replaced completely. Some of the upgrades include all new swing sets, updates to the double slide, an upgraded climbing wall and a new tilted whirlwind seat. The exact start and end date of the project have not been set, but the total cost of the update will be over $17,000, none of which is taxpayer money.  

Williamston’s city engineer Scott De Vries said the update is necessary.

Williamstown Board of Trustees approves Red Cedar River excavation

The Williamston Post
Kelsey Clements

Builders have started unclogging a log-jammed section of the Red Cedar River in Williamstown Township as part of a construction project in Lansing. The Board of Trustees approved the wetlands project in a 4-1 vote on Feb. 10, ensuring that the complex of hotel, residential and retail planned for Clippert Street and Michigan Avenue can go forward. The law requires builders who disrupt a floodplain in one area — which is happening with the Lansing project — to improve wetlands in another area, which is where Williamstown comes in. Jason Hockstok is a civil engineer working for Continental Real Estate, the development company paying for the excavation in Williamstown.