Michigan House representatives speak at MSU

By Alexandra Donlin
MI First Election

When getting out to vote, Asian Pacific Americans often struggle with deciding who to vote or even how to vote. Asian Pacific Americans make up 6 percent of the U.S. population, but voter turnout is lower than any other racial group in the country. This could be because they are often underrepresented in government. On Feb. 27, the Asian Pacific American Studies Program at Michigan State University held an event called Activism, Politics, and Social Media Summit … Raising Asian American Voices.

Meridian Township primary noted for high turnout

By Chris Hung
The Meridian Times Staff Reporter

On March 8, Meridian Township voters hit the polling booths and cast their votes in the 2016 presidential primary election, along with the rest of Michigan. Those booths were a bit busier than usual. According to the township clerk’s office, of the 29,554 registered voters in Meridian, 13,115 submitted either a ballot or an absentee ballot for the primary. It was also reported that at least 3,500 absentee ballots were submitted for this election, compared to only about 1,200 absentee ballots submitted in 2012’s primary. This year’s voter turnout for the primary toppled 2012’s statistic in general, when only 5,917 Meridian voters of 27,377 registered voters submitted a ballot.

Millennials "Feel the Bern"

By Danielle Chesney
Entirely East Lansing

Millennial students are creating clubs to show their dedication to Bernie Sanders, such as the #FeelTheBern MSU group at Michigan State University. While older Democrats may favor Hillary Clinton as their prospective presidential candidate, a poll by NBC News in October 2015 shows that millennials are instead “feeling the Bern” with Bernie Sanders. The poll shows that 54 percent of those between the ages of 18 and 30 would choose to elect Sanders, outweighing Clinton’s 26 percent. “I think that millennials, because they’re young, are idealistic,” said Republican Merri Cullen, 60. “It’s probably one of the coolest ages to be, because you’ve got your whole life ahead of you and you haven’t been jaded yet.

Millennials face obstacles registering to vote

By Chloe Kiple

EAST LANSING, Mich. – Political disinterest, tricky voting laws and registration processes may stand between millennials and the February 8th deadline to register to vote in the upcoming Michigan presidential primary. “I don’t want to vote in the presidential primary,” said Michigan State senior journalism major Kelsey Banas. “I’m really just not into it, I hate politics.”

Less than 50 percent of millennials, or people ages 18 to 35, say that they will not vote in the presidential primary according to a January 2016 USA Today survey. For many young voters like Banas, feeling disengaged or uninterested in politics is a major deterrent to civic engagement and voter registration.

No competition means not many voters in this year’s civic election

By Peter Nuttall
Living In The Ledge Staff Reporter

This past Election Day in Grand Ledge resulted in a poor turnout of voters. According to Grand Ledge City Clerk Gregory Newman, only 10 percent of the registered voters in the city of Grand Ledge came out to the polls to vote on Nov. 3. “Ten percent is a very disappointing number,” Grand Ledge Mayor Kalmin Smith said. This year was a non-presidential election year where only city council spots were up for election.

Election Day for Young Voters

With the November Election less than a month away, many students are gearing up to vote. Some vote absentee in their home districts, while others choose to vote here in East Lansing. Either way, it can get confusing, especially for first-time voters. For students who plan on voting, East Lansing City Clerk Marie Wicks’ message is simple. “I don’t care where you vote, I care that you vote,” Wicks said.

Ingham County Commission results

By Evan Kreager
Ingham County Chronicle staff writer

Lansing, Mich—At 7 a.m. Nov. 6, polling locations across the country opened to voters. Some of us have participated in countless presidential elections. Others are voting for the very first time. In an area like Ingham County that is home to one of the largest universities in the county, the latter of the two groups of voters is exceptionally large.