New study could help Lansing fight vacancy rates

The campus of Lansing Catholic High School is clean and well-kept. The sidewalks are clear, the windows are intact. Walk a few streets over, though, and you won’t find much like it. The area surrounding the high school is riddled with vacant homes and buildings, something that parents and students definitely notice. “You drive by school and you see houses with boarded up windows and tall grass,” says Steven Izzo, a sophomore at Lansing Catholic.

Growing becoming a year-round activity across Michigan

By Julie Campbell
The Meridian Times Staff Reporter

Every business has an off-season. At most places, it just depends on the weather. However, certain weather conditions tend to be more harsh on some businesses than others. For the plant market, winter isn’t easy. For the plant markets in states like Michigan, winter really isn’t easy.

Lansing: Cities within a city

By Tyler Austin
Listen Up, Lansing Staff Reporter

Lansing, like many cities is separated into several sections; Northwest, South, West and East are usually how people go about dividing it. Within each of those sections are all kinds of neighborhoods and attractions, all of which differ from one another quite a bit. The neighborhoods are all very unique and offer very different pieces of the overall culture that is Lansing, according to Chris Tarpoff of the Lansing visitor’s bureau. Old Town is known for its variety of restaurants and art galleries while the downtown area is known for its tall buildings and local shops. Each area offers a specific niche allowing people to truly experience the lifestyles of the city and its residents.

Community Funding for Community Work: How $500 Helps a Lansing Charity

By Ian Wendrow
Listen Up, Lansing

LANSING — Andrew Brewer Jr. didn’t expect his modest barbecue outing with neighbors to be anything more than a fun get together. Starting out with only 20 men hanging out at Hawk Island County Park, Brewer now captains the Men Making A Difference (MMAD) charity, an organization that has existed for about four years now with about 200 active members. “It started with just a group of us out barbecuing one day when I said, ‘We should do more to give back.’ Everyone else seemed to agree and that’s really how this organization got started,” Brewer said. MMAD has been busy in its short four years as a legally-recognized charity. Working alongside the local church groups and neighborhood blocs, MMAD has helped paint woodchips, clean up overgrown shrubbery, and plant flowers in some of Lansing’s more run-down areas.