Students sign leases for next school year

EAST LANSING, Mich.- It’s only six weeks into the fall semester at Michigan State University, but students are already looking into housing options for next year. Freshmen who just arrived on campus have settled into things and are making new friends. However, they now have to decide where they want to live for next year, who they want to live with and it has to be done fast. If not, all the houses and apartments will be leased. “It is a little bit of pressure to have to choose so early in the year when you don’t know what you’re going to take next year and who your friends are going to be,” MSU freshman Sarah Presley said. 

Presley wants to live with someone who doesn’t attend MSU, her friend goes to community college back home but will transfer next year.

PHOTOS: Eating on less than $20 per week

The relationship between college students and food assistance has been very scarce since the U.S. Department of Agriculture Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) policy requirements changed and was then adapted by Michigan Department of Health and Human Services in 2011. This has affected various college students when it comes to paying for constant groceries, especially student Cahlan Gillard-Tucker, a junior at Grand Valley State University in Michigan. He opened up and showed a day in the grocery store for him — from budgeting, coupon cutting, and hoping to find sale sides in every aisle. Groceries can get quite expensive for Tucker when you only have less than $20 in assistance to work with.

State grant helps university fight sexual assault

A new grant from Governor Synder will help Michigan State combat sexual assault.

The 38-thousand dollar aid will go towards the MSU Bystander Network, a group that empowers people to take action if they see signs of sexual assault.

The network is working on an educational seminar for upperclassmen that they want to implement by the Fall 2017 semester. The class will build on the sexual assault workshops mandatory for incoming freshman. “It’s taking it a step further and building on that education,” says Leah Short, MSU Bystander Network project coordinator. When it comes to recognizing assault, Sergeant Andrea Munford of the Michigan State Police Department says that it’s important to trust your gut. “A lot of times, [people] may not recognize it for what it is, but they know they have a bad feeling about it,” said Munford.

Michigan State addresses Immigration Ban

By Chloe Kiple

Michigan State hosted an informational meeting days after President Trump issued an executive order banning immigration from seven countries. While many came with questions, university officials could only offer a little more than support. “We can’t change anything about the executive order,” said one speaker. “We are committed to supporting you.”

MSU faculty from the Office of International Students and Scholars addressed a jam-packed lecture hall in the international center. Lawyer Marie LaComb flipped through a powerpoint detailing the specifics of the ban.

More than a non-registered voter

Marisa Lipcaman, a 20-year-old dietetics major at Michigan State, enjoys dancing and spending time with her friends and family. She minors in dance and is really interested in healthcare. “I feel that we over prescribe and rely on drugs heavily, which often have unpleasant side effects, so I want to use food as medicine,” said Lipcaman. Lipcaman, a junior who lives off campus, said her long-term goal is to work in a private practice and counsel people with clinical illnesses, or anyone that wants to start eating better. When she graduates, she’ll do a one-year internship and then take her exam to become a registered dietician.