State grant helps university fight sexual assault

A new grant from Governor Synder will help Michigan State combat sexual assault.

The 38-thousand dollar aid will go towards the MSU Bystander Network, a group that empowers people to take action if they see signs of sexual assault.

The network is working on an educational seminar for upperclassmen that they want to implement by the Fall 2017 semester. The class will build on the sexual assault workshops mandatory for incoming freshman. “It’s taking it a step further and building on that education,” says Leah Short, MSU Bystander Network project coordinator. When it comes to recognizing assault, Sergeant Andrea Munford of the Michigan State Police Department says that it’s important to trust your gut. “A lot of times, [people] may not recognize it for what it is, but they know they have a bad feeling about it,” said Munford.

Michigan State addresses Immigration Ban

By Chloe Kiple

Michigan State hosted an informational meeting days after President Trump issued an executive order banning immigration from seven countries. While many came with questions, university officials could only offer a little more than support. “We can’t change anything about the executive order,” said one speaker. “We are committed to supporting you.”

MSU faculty from the Office of International Students and Scholars addressed a jam-packed lecture hall in the international center. Lawyer Marie LaComb flipped through a powerpoint detailing the specifics of the ban.

Marisa Lipcaman, age 20.

More than a non-registered voter

Marisa Lipcaman, a 20-year-old dietetics major at Michigan State, enjoys dancing and spending time with her friends and family. She minors in dance and is really interested in healthcare. “I feel that we over prescribe and rely on drugs heavily, which often have unpleasant side effects, so I want to use food as medicine,” said Lipcaman. Lipcaman, a junior who lives off campus, said her long-term goal is to work in a private practice and counsel people with clinical illnesses, or anyone that wants to start eating better. When she graduates, she’ll do a one-year internship and then take her exam to become a registered dietician.

MSU student Joseph Titus, 21, relaxes on his couch after a long day of class. Titus is not registered to vote in the upcoming election and it has a lot to do with his upbringing.

For this MSU student, lack of voting didn’t skip a generation

By Nathaniel Bott

Ann Arbor native and MSU senior Joseph Titus, 21, goes about his busy day with no time to think about politics. He takes his studies and homework to the MSU library or Union, takes to the gridiron in intramural football leagues and plays beer pong with his roommates while tailgating a Spartan football game. According to Circle statistics, an organization that examines youth voting in the United States, Titus is also among the 49.6 percent of people in the state of Michigan from ages 18-29 who didn’t vote in the 2012 presidential election. Only 14.8 percent of people ages 18-29 voted in the 2014 midterm, and Titus wasn’t one of them either. As far as Titus knows, His parents and his 25-year-old sister don’t vote.

Community remembrance in Grand Ledge makes beautiful attraction

By Kaitlin Petrillo
Living In The Ledge Staff Reporter

Grand Ledge has offered a unique way to memorialize and honor loved ones in their community for years. Every April, the Grand Ledge garden club works with people in the area to sell geraniums, memorial plaques, and trees in honor of Grand Ledge residents. The purchase includes the tree, the planting, one year of maintenance, and insurance. “Memorializing a loved one really helps a family celebrate that life,” said Andrea Bregg, the manager and funeral director at McCabe’s Funeral Home. “You realize how fast time goes and I think it can really help the grieving process.

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Decades old MSU rec facilities overlooked by administration

Some of Michigan State’s recreational sports facilities we built in the early 1900’s, and are still in use today. While millions of dollars are being spent on additions to campus, Rec Sports Director Rick McNeil, says the MSU administration has not made these work out facilities a priority in upgrades. McNeil has recently sent in proposals of what existing space could be renovated. One of these proposals involves an emptied pool in IM Circle that has been closed down since the 80’s. Instead, McNeil thinks they should build a new, three-story work out facility in its place.

DeWitt is still not very diverse, but working on it

By Zachary Manning
Bath-DeWitt Connection Staff Reporter

DEWITT — The City of DeWitt has a clear lack of diversity and residents, city officials, school officials, and police have mixed reviews on why. According to the 2010 census, about 95 percent of DeWitt’s population is white, 1.4 percent is black, 0.9 percent is Asian, and 0.4 percent is American Indian. DeWitt’s white population is above the national average of 72.4 percent. DeWitt’s black population is below the national average of 12.6 percent. The Asian population in DeWitt is below the national average of 4.8 percent.