Michigan State University spreads sexual assault awareness across campus

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and this nationally recognized campaign is attempting to educate the nation on sexual violence, increase public awareness and prevent these acts from occurring across the United States, including college campuses such as Michigan State University. One way that Michigan State has been spreading awareness is by hosting a large variety of events. Some of the past events included a 5k, yoga sessions, coffee hours and a special day to wear teal: the color of sexual assault awareness and prevention. 

In addition to these events in East Lansing, on Tuesday, April 16, the MSU museum opened an exhibit called Finding our Voice: Sister Survivors Speak. The exhibit commemorates the sexual assault survivors of former Michigan State osteopathic physician Larry Nassar and draws attention to the pain that he has caused these women, while also creating a sense of hope and healing for the survivors. 

A piece of art with the aim to create this sense of hope is a butterfly dress created by Nassar survivor Alexandra Bourque. The dress is created out of over 300 tie-dye butterflies of bright and vibrant colors, spread out as if they are flying to become part of the dress. 

Bourque, 28, said the dress started off as a display for her store, Brightlytwisted, in Corktown, Detroit.

Women’s Center builds program to help women enter skilled trades

The Women’s Center of Greater Lansing is helping area women build careers in the skilled trades, one concrete slab and brick at a time. The center graduated its first class of six students in July from the new Women in Skilled Trades Apprenticeship Readiness Program. It’s among several programs at the center designed to help women re-enter the workforce.

Restaurants feel loss when internationals students leave

Every summer Ginny Cheung makes the decision to close her East Lansing Chinese restaurant for a few weeks to travel. With her largely Asian college student customer base on summer break, it didn’t make financial sense to keep the doors open. But this summer, East Café located at 1001 E. Grand River Ave. didn’t close its doors. “There are still a few students staying for the summer,” she said.

Does makeup have diversity?

EAST LANSING, Michigan — For years, men and women have struggled with the idea of finding the right shade of beauty for their skin and having it fit to their complexion and skin type.  

There has always been a debate between drugstore makeup companies like Maybelline and Covergirl compared to high-brand cosmetic companies like Urban Decay and Rihanna’s new line “Fenty Beauty.”

Christopher George, who works at Sephora in Lansing and is responsible for matching customers to the right type of makeup for their skin type, said, “Many people have said that the difference between drugstore and Sephora is the quality. Though that may be true, it’s probably just based on their skin type.”

Skin type is different for every person. One can be oily and one can be dry. No one has the same skin type — just like no one has the same skin color.

Sexual objectification: Is it a problem? How do we solve it?

EAST LANSING, Mich. — During Halloween in 2016, Sharon Thomas, a human biology major at University of Michigan, was walking through the neighborhood of Cedar Village around 8 p.m. when a man called her from across the street. “He said, ‘Hey, baby, you look fine,’ then he ran over to me from across the road,” said Thomas.  “I didn’t really register what he was doing at the moment.”

Thomas said the man ran up to her and grabbed her waist while complimenting her. She pushed him away physically, but she couldn’t get him out of her mind.