Time capsule to be rediscovered in 25 years

By Layne Alfred
The Mason Times

As part of the sesquicentennial celebration, the Mason Area Historical Society and Mason City Hall are working to create a time capsule to be buried and viewed in 25 years. “It gives people in the future a snapshot of the time when the time capsule was compiled,” said Alissa Day, vice president of the Mason Area Historical Society. “The time capsule is an excellent way for people of all ages in Mason to put their own mark on this historic event, sharing in Mason’s official 150th anniversary,” said Jean Bement, member and head of the Newsletter Committee. The time capsule will preserve history in a special way, due to its tactile nature. Day explained how much the Historical Society has been stressing the importance to people of printing photographs and hand-writing stories and letters in hopes that they will submit these for the capsule.

Mason residents gather to discuss time capsule submissions

By Justin Sienkowski
The Mason Times

A public workshop to answer questions of Mason residents over the city’s time capsule project was held Nov. 2 at the Mason Area Historical Museum. The meeting was led by Alissa Day, vice president of the Mason Area Historical Society, who covered general instructions and submission ideas for the time capsule. The project, which is a part of Mason’s sesquicentennial celebration put on by the Mason 150 Committee, is accepting submissions until Dec. 1.

Shawhaven celebrates 10 years of fear

By Jake Atnip
The Mason Times

Owners Doug and Tami Shaw opened their doors for their tenth season of scares on Oct. 2. The Shawhaven Haunted Farm continues to grow and add attractions every year. For their 10th year the farm offers 12 attractions. Shawhaven is open only on the weekends.

Sesquicentennial Ball celebrates Mason community pride

By Layne Alfred
The Mason Times

Entering the Sesquicentennial Ball at Mason’s fairground building was like stepping out of a time machine. Women in floor-length ball gowns danced while men in suits and top hats mingled. The Bayou River Band played old jazz tunes on the dance floor. Everything was elegant and nostalgic. The Oct.

150th anniversary Grand Ball is Saturday

By Jake Atnip
The Mason Times

This city has traditions, icons and history. One tradition, which happens only once every 25 years, will light up the lives of residents on Saturday. The Grand Ball returns for Mason’s 150th birthday celebration. Mason’s Grand Ball is the culmination of 150th celebrations and has been planned by a committee for two years. Only 150 tickets are available for the event and some have been sold in advance through the Mason Chamber of Commerce.

Sesquicentennial ceremony program lineup

By Maria Braganini
The Mason Times

Marlon Brown discuses the program for the Mason Sesquicentennial Anniversary Ceremony scheduled for March 9 at 6 p.m.

Brown plans to introduce the Mason 150 Sesquicentennial Anniversary Committee to begin the celebration. After introductions, the Fire Department and 7th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Company B Color Guard will perform. Boy Scouts are expected to lead the Pledge of Allegiance alongside the Mason High School Chamber Choir Star Spangled Banner directed by Mr. Jason R. Konkel. Becky Clinton, member of Mason 150 Sesquicentennial Anniversary Committee and Barb Tornholm, Mason Area Historical Society will present a historical overview of Mason. Several government officials are expected to present including: Gov. Rick Snyder, Sen. Debbie Stabenow and U.S. Rep Mike Bishop, State Sen. Curtis Hertel and State Rep. Tom Cochran, Robin Rep. of the Ingham County Board of Commissioners, and Mayor Mike Waltz representing the Mason City Council.

Mason’s 150th Celebration

By Kelley Waterfall
The Mason Times

Mason celebrated 150 years on March 9 at City Hall. With a ceremony, speeches, Civil War reenactments and much more the night was a huge success. Becky Clinton, member of the Mason 150 group, said “It was beautiful, and I was just happy to be a part of it.”

Marty Colburn, city administrator, said there were a few hundred people there and they included from city officials, elected officials, the state senator, state representatives and many more. The evening included speeches from officials, a civil war reenactment, color guard, the presentation of the Mason 150 flag, and a choir singing a song written for the celebration. The college club also presented the winners of the eighth grade essay contest.

Mason’s 150 flag

By Kelley Waterfall
The Mason Times

The Mason Chamber of Commerce has been helping with the process of making a flag in honor of Mason’s 150th year. “The flag is being made to promote and honor the sesquicentennial of Mason,” said Marlon Brown, mayor pro tem. Doug Klein, the executive director of the Mason area Chamber of Commerce, said the flag has a blue stripe at the top and a red one at the bottom, with the logo over white in the middle. “The logo was chosen from a contest we had about two years ago, where people could submit their logo ideas,” said Klein

The logo has been used all around Mason for the past two years, promoting the 150th anniversary.  They have street signs, banners, shirts and even baby bibs with the logo on it.

Mason 150 book launched

By Kelley Waterfall
The Mason Times

This year marks the 150th year, or sesquicentennial, of Mason. The town was founded on March 9, 1865 and today has over 8,250 residents

Becky Clinton, of Mason, is on the 150th steering committee. Two years ago, no one was making a book for the anniversary, so Clinton started to make it herself. Clinton gathered information from the 100th and 125th anniversary books of Mason. “It wasn’t done on computer then, it was done on carbon paper and a typewriter,” said Clinton.

Malcolm X spent time growing up in Mason

By Kelley Waterfall
The Mason Times

Famous human rights activist Malcolm X, otherwise known as Malcolm Little, passed away on Feb. 21, 1965. This past weekend was the 50th anniversary of his death. It was a special time for not only the nation but for the town of Mason. Malcolm X spent part of his childhood years living in the city of Mason.