Mid-Michigan a Microcosm of Trump Victory

LANSING, Mich. – Inari Ramos strode down Capitol Avenue alone, a winter parka sheltering her from a brisk November gust. Feeling cold and isolated following the outcome of the Nov. 8 election, Ramos wore her emotion close to her heart; a two-toned shirt beneath her jacket expressly stated her disgust. “F— Donald Trump.”

The black lettering on Ramos’ T-shirt espoused the majority of Lansing’s voting population’s views.

Powerful women: a herstory

Women have overcome obstruction on their way to leadership positions, but plenty of obstacles still exist for women pursuing those roles. Hillary Clinton’s loss in the 2016 presidential election could be considered the ultimate heartbreak in a career of service and fighting to break through a glass ceiling of leadership opportunities, but her campaign for the presidency changed women’s history no matter the outcome. Meet other women, primarily from Michigan, who have also made contributions to women’s history and broke through barriers to achieve in many different fields of work.

Can Trump or Clinton bolster Michigan manufacturing?

Michigan has experienced six years straight of automotive sector growth, according to an analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics data. After plummeting to a 21st century low in 2009, the 2015 rate again marked improvement in employment, with about 122,400 Michigan workers in the field compared to 117,600 the year before. In the Nov. 8 election, both major-party candidates have promised to preserve the boom. When in Michigan, both Republican nominee Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton keyed in on the issue of manufacturing strength as a point of persuasion for undecided voters.

Housing plan stalled; future uncertain

By Nakea Paige
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

The city of Lansing is at odds with a proposed new housing development project that will create affordable housing for some families. Over the past two years, there has been a building, located at 1113 N. Washington Ave, that has been waiting to be turned in to a new low-income housing development. There has been a standstill because of the fact that council members feel that there might be some discrimination within the regulations for this housing project. The head of the project, Dr. Sam Saboury, has been trying to find ways to get the project underway. In March, the Lansing City Council rejected Saboury’s request for a 4 percent Payment in Lieu of Taxes, or PILOT, which would have enhanced the prospect of securing the tax credit and being able to start the development.