The doctor prescribed addiction: prescription drugs take on illicit roles in Lansing, nationwide

By Nakea Paige
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

When you go to the doctor, you hope to leave with a cure. However, some leave with an addiction, or a new job as a drug dealer. More and more, people are using prescription drugs like antidepressants or pain medication as a way one would use hardcore drugs. They are using them for recreation or even selling them which is not what these medications are for. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, prescription drug addiction is becoming a big issue killing more people from accidental overdoses.

To adopt, or to buy? That is a pet question

By Nakea Paige
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

More people are looking more to having an animal to snuggle with at night instead of some annoying person. The only thing people have to decide is whether to adopt or to purchase a puppy from either a breeder or owner. With all of the animal shelters and abandoned animals, one would think that adoption would be an easy go to for animal lovers. Even though there are abandoned animals in shelters, people still stray to websites like Craigslist or Facebook looking to buy an animal. According to the adoptapet.com, it normally costs a person about $220 just to adopt an already ready animal.

Meridian Township is trying to fix failing infrastructure with limited resources

By Kelly Sheridan
The Meridian Times Staff Reporter

In 2016, Meridian Township has several infrastructure projects planned, including road construction, sanitary sewer projects and drain maintenance. Working in tandem with the Ingham County Road Department, and the Ingham County Drain Commissioner, the Public Works Department is trying to improve failing infrastructure with the limited resources it has. Since Meridian Township is a township, it is not responsible for the operations and maintenance of their road and drain system. The government works with the Ingham County Road Department and the Ingham County Drain Commissioner when projects become too big for the township to handle. However, the township is often the first place residents call to get their issues fixed, Chief Engineer Younes Ishraidi said.

Bus Rapid Transit could replace CATA's Route 1 bus

By Griffin Wasik
Ingham County Chronicle Staff Reporter

A $143 million proposed Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system could be finished as soon as 2018. The BRT would run from the Capitol to Meridian Mall via Michigan and Grand River avenues. It would also add a designated bus lane, remove current bus stops, and add traffic signals, according to Meridian Township documents. “The total cost of the BRT is not $133 million,” John R. Veenstra, a Trustee member on the Meridian Township Board of Commissioners, said. “Many people are getting this confused.

Gun crimes dipping in Michigan

By Andrew Merkle
Ingham County Chronicle Staff Reporter

Guns have a negative connotation for many Americans these days. Most news reports Americans see about guns describe the most recent mass shooting on United States soil or terror attack overseas. These stories can create the perception that gun crimes are on the rise, and sometimes the media is blamed for stirring the pot. In Michigan, however, gun crime is not on the rise. In fact, gun crimes have dipped in the past decade.

Eighty more miles of bicycle paths coming to Ingham County

By Griffin Wasik
Ingham County Chronicle Staff Reporter

The Meridian Township Board of Commissioners recently unanimously passed a revision to the Pedestrian-Bicycle Master Plan will add nearly 80 more miles of bicycle paths on shoulders of roads, cross-country paths, and unpaved roads to Ingham County. There are currently about 110 miles of such paths, according to meeting officials. The plan will improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists who are trying to access parks, businesses, or people out exercising, according to meeting officials. The master plan deals with much bigger things, Ron Styka, a trustee member on the Meridian Township Board of Commissioners, said. “Our goal is to have people be able to travel anywhere in this township by biking or hiking all the way to Lansing,” Styka said.

Opioid-related deaths on the rise in Ingham County

By Andrew Merkle
Ingham County Chronicle Staff Reporter

The Ingham County Health Department reported that opioid-related deaths have increased by nearly 66 percent over the last five years after a relatively constant rate from 2003-2010. Heroin is the most common narcotic among the 50 opioid-related deaths in Ingham County last year, according to the Ingham County Health Department. Ingham County is not an anomaly, either. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heroin-related overdose deaths had nearly quadrupled nationwide between 2002 and 2013, with more than 8,200 such deaths occurring in 2013. As the county and nation are seeing an increase in opioid-related overdose deaths, it should surprise no one that the state of Michigan has seen an increased rate in opioid-related hospitalizations as well.

The college admission SAT test has been redesigned

By Kelsey Clements
The Williamston Post

The PSAT and SAT have been redesigned as of this year. The new test will be scored differently than the previous SAT. Before, students were deducted points for every wrong question. Now, students will only be scored for correct answers. There is no punishment for guessing on a question, so students must strategically take the test in a different way.

Lansing Township: ‘business as usual’ following arrest of Stuart Dunnings III

By Rachel Beard, Hannah Brenner, Grant Essenmacher and Ana Williams
Lansing Township News Staff Reporters

Lansing Township citizens and leadership turned on their televisions on March 14 and were shocked to hear Attorney General Bill Schuette announce that Ingham County Prosecutor Stuart Dunnings III had been arrested and faced with 15 separate charges related to prostitution. “I have worked with Stuart Dunnings while I have served as Attorney General,” Schuette said. “I am saddened that an elected official who holds a special trust from voters and is the chief prosecutor in our capital city would allegedly engage in conduct causing felony and misdemeanor charges to be filed.”

But for Lansing Township officials, it’s been business as usual since Dunnings’ arrest. Lansing Township Police Chief Kay Hoffman realizes that the necessary reaction is to keep moving forward, operating and protecting citizens as if everything is normal. “We are moving on and operating as we normally do,” Hoffman said.