boy reading math book

Misconceptions of education, part two: homeschooling

Our education system has a large variety of ideas and practices. Some parents choose to send their children to public schools, some choose private or charter schools, while some parents choose to home school. This is part two of the ‘Misconceptions’ series, chronicling differences in our education system. If you would like to read part one, click here “Misconceptions of Public Schools.” Misconceptions of homeschooling
Sandra Datema and Telly Ryan are two mothers who chose to home-school their children.

boy and teacher reading

Misconceptions of education, part one: public schools

Our education system is changing. With the click of a button, kindergartners can access whatever information they want on the internet. Due to safety becoming a growing priority, signing out your child has seemingly become a ten-step process. Vending machines have been emptied to reduce childhood obesity. Teachers are expected to go back to school to earn their master’s while at the same time taking a pay cut.

Federal lawsuit looks for ‘adjunctive relief,’ transgender school policies still important debate in Williamston

After months of deliberation and a slew of meetings trademarked with passionate arguments, the Williamston Community Schools Board of Education passed a pair of policies in November 2017 in relation to transgender youth and their definition, among other guidelines. And despite passing months ago, the debate surrounding the policies have yet to go away. Currently, there’s a pending federal lawsuit that names six of seven Williamston Board of Education members as defendants: Greg Talberg, Christopher Lewis, Sarah Belanger, Nancy Deal, Kathy Hayes and Joel Gerring. The seventh member of the board at the time, Jeffrey West, was the lone vote against the policies, which the school board passed 6-1. He is not named in the lawsuit.

Asian Culture Club unites Okemos High, community

 

The ACC is the Asian Culture Club at Okemos High School. The organization brings all races together and volunteered in the Chinese New Year celebration at Meridian Mall. Although the organization’s members are just high schoolers, they bring positive energy to their high school and to the community by welcoming everyone together for equality, and learning about one another. Gaelin Zhao is the president of the Asian Culture Club and is currently a junior at Okemos High School. Since joining ACC his freshman year, he’s enjoying being a part of the organization.

Lansing School Board appoints 2 new members

The Lansing School Board appointed two new members to the board at a regular meeting on Feb. 1. After a 4-3 vote, Michigan State University Senior Research Associate Nathan Burroughs and CEO/Leader Physician at Care Free Medical Clinic, Dr. Farhan Bhatti, were chosen as the new members of the board. Burroughs, who interviewed for the position at the previous meeting via Skype, said he knows it will be a while until he feels confident with the dynamics of a school board. “Despite having some expertise I’m fully aware that I have a steep learning curve,” Burroughs said.

Professor of practice: More than a title?

While the term ‘professor of practice’ is popping up in universities all around the country, few know what this title actually means. While MSU doesn’t technically recognize ‘professor of practice’ as an official title, this phrase can certainly be found on faculty bios in colleges and departments within the university.

A Northern Michigan school district promotes diversity in a non-diverse region

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. — Northern Michigan is not a very diverse region, which is reflected in the extremely small percentage of different ethnicities in Traverse City Area Public Schools (TCAPS). Shown here are the total numbers of students of each ethnicity via Mary Beth Stein, a student services coordinator at TCAPS. Below are the numbers from the 2010 census year. Gina McPherson, a preschool teacher at TCAPS, has a lot of experience with this.

The complicated line between bullying and free speech in schools

The Southern Poverty Law Center reported 437 incidents of harassment between Nov. 9 and Nov. 14 last year, the days following the election of President Donald Trump. The same report said most of the occurrences were reported at K-12 school locations. According to the Southern Poverty Law center, most of the incidents targeted immigrants, African Americans or the LGBT community. The reports raise questions about the freedom of speech in schools and the line between students’ First Amendment rights and harassment.