Lansing Township keeping a wary eye on neighboring Lansing’s crime rate

By Grant Essenmacher
Lansing Township News Staff Reporter

Lansing Township has been affected by the high crime rates of neighboring Lansing for years. That continues to be the case nowadays, and is a problem that the township must deal with. In 2014, the crime rate in Lansing was 44 percent higher than the national average according to areavibes, a service that provides demographics for cities. For Lansing Township citizen Brian Watkins, the crimes surrounding the area is a major issue. “I think anytime you are discussing crime, especially in a suburb of a bigger city it’s an issue.” Watkins said.

Voter turnout in township ‘mirrors trends that we see around the country’

By Rachel Beard
Lansing Township News Staff Reporter

The March 8, 2016 presidential primary resulted in a record-breaking voter turnout in Michigan, and, while perhaps not record-breaking, Lansing Township also experienced a higher turnout than usual. “Well, [voter turnout] was double what it was four years ago,” Lansing Township Clerk Susan Aten said. “It was higher than it normally is, for that particular election.”

The average turnout here was 35 percent. “Our precincts ranged from 25 to 43 percent,” Lansing Township Supervisor Diontrae Hayes said. “Information comes from the clerk’s office and [is] also posted on Ingham County’s website.”

Christopher Larimer, Professor of American Politics at the University of Northern Iowa, attributes this increase in turnout to the large number of Republican candidates running for office.

Lansing Township: ‘business as usual’ following arrest of Stuart Dunnings III

By Rachel Beard, Hannah Brenner, Grant Essenmacher and Ana Williams
Lansing Township News Staff Reporters

Lansing Township citizens and leadership turned on their televisions on March 14 and were shocked to hear Attorney General Bill Schuette announce that Ingham County Prosecutor Stuart Dunnings III had been arrested and faced with 15 separate charges related to prostitution. “I have worked with Stuart Dunnings while I have served as Attorney General,” Schuette said. “I am saddened that an elected official who holds a special trust from voters and is the chief prosecutor in our capital city would allegedly engage in conduct causing felony and misdemeanor charges to be filed.”

But for Lansing Township officials, it’s been business as usual since Dunnings’ arrest. Lansing Township Police Chief Kay Hoffman realizes that the necessary reaction is to keep moving forward, operating and protecting citizens as if everything is normal. “We are moving on and operating as we normally do,” Hoffman said.

Changes occurring on the Lansing Township Board of Trustees

By Grant Essenmacher
Lansing Township News Staff Reporter

The Lansing Township Board of Trustees has made changes at its supervisor position. Kathy Rodgers, who served as the supervisor for three years and held public office for 30 years, retired on Feb. 29. The board has elected Trustee Diontrae Hayes to serve the remainder of Rodgers term, which ends in November. They now have an open trustee position, and are accepting applications for that position until March 18.

Interim supervisor looks to township’s future

By Rachel Beard
Lansing Township News Staff Reporter

This November, Lansing Township voters will be voting for more than just a new president of the United States. They’ll also be voting for a new supervisor for the township. On Feb. 26, Kathleen Rodgers served her last day as the Lansing Township supervisor after more than 27 years in township government. Former board of trustees member Diontrae Hayes took her place on Feb.