Drones may fight invasive species–with cameras

By NATASHA BLAKELY
Capital News Service

LANSING — Invasive plants can grow so thick and tall they hide the world’s greatest Lakes. “In the lower part of the state it’s pretty bad,” said Laura Bourgeau-Chavez, a research scientist with Michigan Technological University. “We were doing work in Saginaw Bay, and there are kids who live there and they don’t even know there’s water there because the weeds are so tall. “So they’re unable to take advantage of the fact that they live next to a Great Lake.”
Help is on the way. Bourgeau-Chavez maps wetlands and monitors them in the field.

Conservation in the Bat Zone

By EAMON DEVLIN
Capital News Service
LANSING — Michigan – Bat-ter up! You can step up to the plate at the newly renovated Bat Zone in Bloomfield Hills. We’re not talking new batting cages at a fun park. This is North America’s only sanctuary and education center for bats and other nocturnal creatures.  It is run by the Organization for Bat Conservation at the Cranbrook Institute of Science.

Annual Wild Game Dinner in Bath benefits wildlife, economy

By Laina Stebbins
Bath-DeWitt Connection Reporter

BATH — Bath may be a relatively small community compared to others in the state, but what it lacks in population size it makes up for in natural bounty. The third annual Wild Game Dinner, hosted by the Michigan Wildlife Conservancy this month, will once again highlight Bath’s plentiful natural resources by showcasing local hunters’ contributions to their township while benefiting wildlife conservation efforts. Taking place March 19 at the Bengel Wildlife Center from 6-10 p.m., Bath’s 2016 Wild Game Dinner will feature a silent auction, music and door prizes, a cash bar, and an all-you-can-eat strolling dinner of wild game and other food. Food will be replenished until 9 p.m.

The provisions at these dinners can vary greatly, ranging from relatively standard wild game choices to more exotic ones for adventurous eaters. For this particular event, participants can expect “some bear, venison, some duck, some geese, some lake trout, and a whole list of other different game,” said Kim McKenzie, Office Administrator at the Michigan Wildlife Conservancy.