Backpacks and diaper bags: affording student life and parenthood

AUDIO: Full-time student and full-time parent. Being a college student is already expensive, but imagining being a parent as well. With the rising cost of tuition averaging $12,000 a year, housing, books, along with diapers, baby formula and more, it can be financially overwhelming. For some it can seem impossible to live a balance like that. Yet there’s some that can make it work.

Live comfortably, or affordably? College students have to choose

Over the last few years East Lansing, Mich. has seen a drastic increase of apartment complexes. Prior to before there are more options than ever, for East Lansing residents. More and more these apartment are coming with amenities that will have college students at Michigan State University living better than some working adults. Apartment companies like SkyVue , DTN, and Hannah Lofts just to name a few are dominating the millennial housing market in the area.

Spring break another financial stress for college students

College in the spring is all about spring break. Yet, spring break vacation can be expensive. Students already having to pay for the new school year can be another financial stress putting together a vacation. Luckily, planning early help to make it more affordable. Michigan State student Albertina Mays is an expert at saving money for spring break.

Young adults are finding themselves living at home to cover costs

 

When 24-year-old Ben Zink moved to Los Angeles last March, he was hoping that he would be able to sustain himself and accomplish his major goal: moving out of his parent’s house. “I feel like I should be living on my own,” said Zink, who graduated from Grand Valley State University. “I know my parents do not mind, but I still feel bad just being here.”

Despite working as a production assistant at Helo Productions, cooking at Buffalo Wild Wings and interning at Therapy Studios, Zink ran through all of his savings in just three months in Los Angeles. “I moved home because I basically ran out of money,” Zink said. “I had less than $500 in my bank account and I needed some of it to even get back.”

But Zink’s not alone: 19 percent of college graduates find themselves living at home, according to a recent study by the Pew Research Center.

New push aims to close skills gap between graduates and jobs

By BRIDGET BUSH
Capital News Service
LANSING – Michigan lawmakers, university officials and local school systems have taken up the fight to improve how well the state’s students learn to be high tech producers and consumers. Just this fall, Michigan State University redesigned a course that will teach 175 student teachers to incorporate computational thinking into curriculum. And the university is offering a new graduate certificate in creative computing to about 250 teachers for professional development. Aman Yadav, MSU associate professor of counseling, educational psychology and special education and director of its Masters of Arts in Educational Technology program, sees the greater purpose of this new approach to be “moving students from consumers of technology to creators and producers.”
Meanwhile,  lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow computer programming to count as a foreign language or arts requirement. The bill was approved by the House in May and is in the Senate Committee on Education.

Michigan legislature split on how to handle college tuition

By RAY WILBUR
Capital News Service
LANSING — Michigan officials are weighing their options for solutions to a university funding crisis that saddles the state’s students with the ninth-highest average debt in the country. That’s how the Michigan League for Public Policy recently ranked the state in a report that shows state support of universities dropping 30 percent since 2003. The revelations are not surprising. In 2011 Gov. Rick Snyder cut higher education funding by 15 percent, the league said. That came after years of smaller cuts caused by the nationwide recession.

Young Democratic Socialists have MSU chapter

Story by Alexandra Donlin
Video by Natasha Blakely
MI First Election

Bernie Sanders, the candidate whose politics are most outside the mainstream, belongs to a group that has 43 chapters chapters nationwide. This group is the Democratic Socialists. For the younger crowd, there’s a specific group just for them: The Young Democratic Socialists. There are 24 chapters across the nation at high schools and colleges, including Michigan State University. The organization started in the early 2000s and was brought back to MSU’s campus this January.