boy reading math book

Misconceptions of education, part two: homeschooling

Our education system has a large variety of ideas and practices. Some parents choose to send their children to public schools, some choose private or charter schools, while some parents choose to home school. This is part two of the ‘Misconceptions’ series, chronicling differences in our education system. If you would like to read part one, click here “Misconceptions of Public Schools.” Misconceptions of homeschooling
Sandra Datema and Telly Ryan are two mothers who chose to home-school their children.

boy and teacher reading

Misconceptions of education, part one: public schools

Our education system is changing. With the click of a button, kindergartners can access whatever information they want on the internet. Due to safety becoming a growing priority, signing out your child has seemingly become a ten-step process. Vending machines have been emptied to reduce childhood obesity. Teachers are expected to go back to school to earn their master’s while at the same time taking a pay cut.

In Williamston, running a business, being a mother is a juggling act

The house at 5108 Barton Road in Williamston looks like any other house. There are trees out front, a few cars parked in the driveway and a garage door wide open, giving people a glimpse of the backyard. All seems normal until the sound of dogs, chickens and alpacas fill the air. Yes, alpacas. In the backyard of this home lies Circle 6 Alpacas, a fiber production farm that houses 30 alpacas, one goat, three horses, two dogs, five cats and 10 chickens.

State works to improve payments to county child care programs

By ALEXANDER SMITH
Capital News Service
LANSING — Delays in paying for programs that help troubled youth are prompting an overhaul of how the state reimburses county courts for the services. The Child Care Fund reimburses half of county court expenses for programs that support abused, neglected and delinquent youth. A recent state audit disclosed slow payments but also said some of them may be ineligible for reimbursement — even though counties’ budgets had previous approval. “If the state can’t uphold a budget it approved, kids and courts suffer,” said Eric Stevens, administrator of the Muskegon County Circuit Court. “Forget about creativity.

Homeless couple in Clinton County loses child due to alleged lack of medical care

By Cydni Robinson
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

On Feb. 24, DeWitt Township Police and Mercy Ambulance were called to the Town and Country Motel, 16262 U.S. Route 27, at 4:52 a.m., said police officials. When Officer Kyle Kolka arrived to the scene he noticed a naked 45-year-old woman lying on her left side on top of a large amount of blood. Allegedly next to the woman was a male infant that was still attached to an umbilical cord and appeared listless, he said. Kolka attempted to clear the child’s airway and begin CPR.

MSU Extension helps Clinton County residents improve their lives

By Cydni Robinson
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

Michigan State University Extension helps people in different counties in Michigan like Clinton County improve their lives by bringing the vast knowledge resources of MSU to individuals, communities and businesses, according to MSU Extension’s Web page. For more than 100 years, MSU Extension has helped grow Michigan’s economies by providing information to help people do their jobs better, raise healthy families, build their communities and empower children to dream of a successful future. MSU Extension for Clinton County offers a lot of programs fitting into categories like Clinton County 4-H, agriculture, nutrition & health, children youth and families, dairy and nurturing and parenting. “I think extension is very important. They are the conduits through which we transfer the research and knowledge from MSU to actual applications in communities,” said Dr. Laura Reese, professor of political science at MSU.

Heather’s Dance Company strives to be a positive institution in St. Johns

By Cydni Robinson
Clinton County Staff Reporter

ST. JOHNS — Heather’s Dance Company is an institution that sets itself apart from the rest when it comes to representing themselves. This company at 221 N. Clinton Ave. is Christian-based with the motto “Praise God through dance,” always making sure to represent God in the most pleasing way. “Dance can create community through shared experience, whether it be in the classroom or in a more public environment.

Religious Freedom or Children’s Rights: Which Matters More?

By Ian Wendrow
Listen Up, Lansing

LANSING-Organizations across Lansing are responding to a package of bills passed by the Michigan House of Representatives, which allows state funded agencies the right to deny service to potential parents based on “sincerely held religious beliefs.”

Of the multiple faith based adoption agencies in Michigan, Bethany Christian Services (BCS) is the largest among them. When contacted, BCS refused to speak directly to reporters but did release a press statement addressing the proposed bills:

“The legislation approved by the House preserves in law Michigan’s longstanding public/private partnership with a diverse group of private, secular, and faith-based agencies that work side-by-side to find permanent, loving homes for vulnerable children. It doesn’t restrict anyone from participating in foster care or adoption, but it does preserve for faith-based agencies the freedom to be faithful to our convictions,” it read. However, not all of Lansing agrees with the statement that the bills do not restrict parental candidates. Equality Michigan, the only statewide advocacy group for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) peoples and HIV sufferers with offices in Detroit and Lansing, spoke out at an anti-adoption bill rally.

Advancements in curriculum further innovative learning

By Juliana Moxley
Old Town Lansing Times staff writer

OLD TOWN LANSING — A $3.4 million grant was awarded to the Lansing School District to implement a new curriculum that will offer students an innovative way to learn and prepare them for the future. Introducing the MSAP

The Lansing School District was awarded the Magnet grant, which is funded through the Magnet Schools Assistance Program, or MSAP. MSAP is an affiliate of the U.S. Department of Education. The grant benefits six schools in the Lansing School District and specifies what technology, personnel, training, and project materials are needed in each Magnet school and then funds those needs. The Lansing schools receiving money from the Magnet grant are Fairview Elementary School, Sheridian Road Elementary School, Cavanaugh Elementary School, Mt.