Williamston couple’s charity helps children locally, in Haiti

Tucked into one of Williamston’s neighborhoods, the Monette house greets you with a large chalk drawing on the driveway and a wall of paint tubes in the garage. Barbara and Dean Monette said they have always loved children, whether it be teaching or simply helping the neighbor kids with painting which started with their own children. To channel that love, the couple created The Monette Children’s Enrichment Fund. The fund became an official 501(c)(3) nonprofit about a year ago but the Monette’s have been raising money for about four years. The fund is for promoting Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math (STEAM) programs in local schools as well as in Haiti.

Building a community with Matt Mulford’s ‘artists of Keller’s upstairs’

Williamston has all the markings of an American small town: historic buildings comprising its downtown section, local family owned restaurants, a bridal shop, a glass blowing studio and the local hardware store. Nestled above the affairs of the main Williamston strip on Grand River is a somewhat unknown plaza that even local Williamston residents may pass by: Keller’s Plaza, home to “Williamston’s hidden gem” as nearly all of the Plaza’s shop owners called their little hideaway. Keller’s Plaza is home to a small candle shop Mud Country Candles, a small party store, a glass engravings shop called the Glass Fox, a dance studio, and Peculiar Perspective’s. Matt Mulford runs Peculiar Perspectives, a studio and art gallery at the top of the landing on the second floor of the plaza, along with Tony Steele. Mulford and Steele’s friendship and passion for art goes back years Mulford says.

Brick-and-mortar art festival livens up Williamston alley

Going back to its roots, Williamston had its first inaugural Alleyfest which included musicians, artists and glassblowers, creating an old-fashioned festival reminiscent of the antique shops littering Williamston’s main drag. The festival was spearheaded by founder Will Long and his partner and co-founder, Matt Mulford. This was a way that Williamston could bring back its brick-and-mortar history. Williamston is known for its antique shops, however, the downtown area now has four vacant buildings and residents are becoming worried Long said. “It’s great for all of our businesses that are downtown and it gives our residents that live in town, something to do,” Tammy Gilroy, Williamston mayor, said.

Fireworks Glass Studios is heating up Williamston

With the frigid temperatures and snow-covered streets, one might step inside Williamston’s Fireworks Glass Studios out of curiosity, or to warm up. When they first walk inside, they will still feel the cold wind outside because the studio leaves the front door propped open. When they walk deeper into the studio, the temperature increases and they might even break a sweat. Lining the counter are dozens of hand-crafted glass art. Behind the counter are the people and machines that make them.

Q & A about fluid fashion with Rebecca Schuiling

EAST LANSING, Michigan — Men and women’s fashion has had distinguishable characteristics according to how one separates between genders.  

Men’s fashion has been known to have more masculine characteristics — structured bottoms and tops.  Women’s fashion has a more feminine touch with loose fitting pieces that emphasize a female approach.  

Androgynous fashion is clothing that can be worn by both men and women. Recently, fashion has been blurring the lines between what is considered “gender specific.”

The Spartan Newsroom interviewed an individual who has opinions about what gender fluidity actually means to them and what is to come of androgynous fashion:

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