MSU sophomore is making an impact as a mentor

The year is 2010. A young man, age 12, walks into the local liquor store on Detroit’s west side and buys 20 boxes of Mike and Ike candy. To the cashier this may look like a kid with an insatiable sweet tooth on his way to school, but to Andrei Nichols, this purchase would prove to be the root of his entrepreneurial future. “My very first business venture was in seventh grade when I started selling Mike and Ikes and Now and Laters, two for $1,” Nichols said. “I did that for a week and made $50 and said ‘I could get used to this.’ And after that I really started to like business.”

Nichols then began to ask his father, who is an entrepreneur, questions about how to start a business; the ins and outs of the business world.

boy and teacher reading

Misconceptions of education, part one: public schools

Our education system is changing. With the click of a button, kindergartners can access whatever information they want on the internet. Due to safety becoming a growing priority, signing out your child has seemingly become a ten-step process. Vending machines have been emptied to reduce childhood obesity. Teachers are expected to go back to school to earn their master’s while at the same time taking a pay cut.

Q&A: Is this the best time in America to look for a job?

On June 4, 2018, President Trump tweeted that now is the “best time ever to look for a job,” and that this is “the greatest economy in the history of America”. According to the Michigan Department of Technology, Management & Budget, this holds partially true. U.S. Jobless rates steadily declined in the last year, dropping from 4.4 to 3.9 percent from April 2017 to April 2018. Jim Rhein, an economic analyst at the Detroit branch of the Michigan Department of Technology, Management & Budget, gave his insight on the labor markets in Michigan and how job markets are performing at this time in the economy. Q: When it comes to the tweet that President Trump made, do you think that this holds true for Michigan specifically?

“Yes Means Yes” legislation introduced in Michigan

Recently, news headlines across the United States have been jam-packed with stories about sexual assault. The #MeToo movement has been making a large splash for several months now. The case surrounding ex-sports doctor Larry Nassar has drawn national attention as several survivors of his sexual attacks came forward. Michigan State University has found itself at the forefront of discussion concerning on-campus sexual assault during recent months. The Nassar case has caused several university leaders to step down. Several reports about student athletes sexually assaulting other students have come out, giving the university a black eye that it certainly doesn’t want. All of these reports bring up questions surrounding sex education in public schools.

Cycling program creates more accessibility opportunities in New York City

NEW YORK — Susan Genis has limited vision. When she’s out, she wears dark, bulky sunglasses that cover all sides of her eyes to protect the vision she has left from the sun. She doesn’t use a walking stick or need a guide dog’s help to navigate the hustle and bustle of New York’s streets – she has already been doing that for years. But when it comes to some things, Genis needs a little help. One of those things is riding a bike.

Social media allows small businesses to grow

Before the age of technology and social media, getting noticed as a small business was nearly impossible in a world where large corporations are the go-to. Advances in technology have given small businesses an opportunity to grow and thrive in the market. Social media has become a crucial component for any business to be successful. Companies hire people just to run social media accounts and to promote the business online. In a day and age where people live online, having an online presence is imperative for maintaining customers and earning new ones.

Feeling the squeeze-more Manhattan natives moving to NYC’s boroughs

NEW YORK — As more people move into a city, population, housing and overall living expenses seem to go one way—up. Manhattan is no different. People move in, prices increase, and those who have lived in a neighborhood their entire life may find that they can no longer afford it, said Nicole Gelinas a Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, a local based think tank, and an expert in state and local fiscal policy, along with public transportation and infrastructure. The cost of living has changed significantly over several different time periods, and for different reasons she said. “Since the financial crisis, so we’ll say since 2008, the sales market has certainly increased markedly in prices,” Gelinas said.

student creating a poster

Our education system is rapidly changing

Our students today are learning in an environment that is constantly updating itself. From the research in universities to the new standards in curriculum, teachers are at the forefront in preparing our children for the world that they eventually will be going into.

Girl Scout Troop 6000 provides stability for homeless youth in NYC

NEW YORK — Ebony Daniel didn’t expect to find herself in the situation she was in. She had just become a single mother to three young girls after losing their father to an unexpected heart attack and was living in a tiny one-room bedroom in a shelter in Queens. “My kids were devastated because they thought he would have been coming home the next day, but he didn’t wake up,” Daniel said. “Being in a shelter, there is a lot of strain.”

Daniel saw that her girls – Leilani, 12, Maliyah, 7, and Melanie, 5 – needed a change. That’s when she found out about Girl Scout Troop 6000, New York City’s first troop entirely comprised of young girls living in homeless shelters.