NYT national editor talks international coverage, leadership

A visit to the College of Communication Arts and Sciences topped the itinerary of Marc Lacey, national editor of The New York Times, who would spend the rest of his weekend in Detroit, meeting with 22 of the newspaper’s correspondents.

MSU Mastercard Fellow Gloria Nzeka and ComArtSci Dean Prabu David interviewed Lacey, asking about reportage of Africa, press responsibility, among other topics.

A walk with Detroit’s favorite demon

A red demon whose presence indicates doom for Detroit may seem like a strange cause for organizing, but each March the idea of the Nain Rouge brings hundreds to the historic Cass Corridor. The reason for this gathering is the annual Marche Du Nain Rouge. The Marche is an event run primarily by volunteers and occurs each year at the end of March. The event is a parade of sorts in the style of Mardi Gras, one that turns the spectator into a participant. This is one of the things that keeps Patrick Kage, 52, coming each year.

Michigan State University spreads sexual assault awareness across campus

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and this nationally recognized campaign is attempting to educate the nation on sexual violence, increase public awareness and prevent these acts from occurring across the United States, including college campuses such as Michigan State University. One way that Michigan State has been spreading awareness is by hosting a large variety of events. Some of the past events included a 5k, yoga sessions, coffee hours and a special day to wear teal: the color of sexual assault awareness and prevention. 

In addition to these events in East Lansing, on Tuesday, April 16, the MSU museum opened an exhibit called Finding our Voice: Sister Survivors Speak. The exhibit commemorates the sexual assault survivors of former Michigan State osteopathic physician Larry Nassar and draws attention to the pain that he has caused these women, while also creating a sense of hope and healing for the survivors. 

A piece of art with the aim to create this sense of hope is a butterfly dress created by Nassar survivor Alexandra Bourque. The dress is created out of over 300 tie-dye butterflies of bright and vibrant colors, spread out as if they are flying to become part of the dress. 

Bourque, 28, said the dress started off as a display for her store, Brightlytwisted, in Corktown, Detroit.

Lansing Community College offers high demand skills trade programs

There are lots of degrees that you can finish in two years and come out making some good money, but you may have to get your hands a little dirty. Students at LCC aren’t learning in a traditional classroom setting. Instead of picking up a pencil, they pick up a blow torch. “I really enjoy working with my hands and applying myself,” Jared Walter, an LCC junior, said. LCC offers a number of options for students going into a skilled trade and welding is one that’s in high demand. Scott Poe, LCC welding instructor, said, “There is this huge need to get people involved, to get the younger generation in and start using their hands.”

After decades of pushing bachelor degrees, high paying trade jobs sit vacant.

MSU professor takes bugs to national television

For those who are fans of the Oxygen Network, an MSU professor is the channel’s newest star. Dr. Eric Benbow, a forensic entomologist at Michigan State University, was called upon to work on the Oxygen series “Smiley Face Killers: The Hunt for Justice.” The episode centers around Todd Geib, a 22-year-old who was found in a lake north of Grand Rapids. The autopsy concluded it was death by drowning, but bugs found on the body said otherwise. That’s where Dr. Benbow comes in.

Club at MSU teaches you how to quickstep

If you’re a student at Michigan State and a friend asks you to go dancing, we’re pretty sure it wouldn’t be at this location… but maybe it’s exactly the dance floor for a quickstep. It’s the ballroom dance team- a club here at MSU that meets Monday through Thursday, every week, 10 p.m. till midnight. “It’s a good way to wrap up a stressful day,” Taylor Kuminski, a student majoring in animal science, said. Think of it like ‘Dancing with the Stars,’ just after chemistry class.