Female athletes battle body image portrayals in media

Michigan State University track and field athlete Denise Spann focuses a lot of time and energy on her body. That’s because she’s focused on trying to perform her best on the track, said Spann, a junior from Coconut Creek, Florida. Muscle structure and body weight can play a significant role in how an athlete performs.

But, Spann said, media portrayals of female athletes seem too focused almost entirely on how women look and not on how athletic they are. “Most of the time they just want to see a beautiful girl play a sport, because there’s a stigma in certain sports that you can’t be beautiful and be one of the best,” Spann said. “I think that the focus should be on the skill, because female athletes do work so hard to be good at their craft, only for it be overshadowed by the way they look, or how their body looks.”

Increased anxiety

Michigan State kinesiology professor Dan Gould studies sports psychology for all age levels of athletes and said having insecurities about your body can lead to increased anxiety and worry.

Cynthia’s near-death experience: Q&A

Cynthia Lawson clinically died of a heart attack – vitals stopped, and doctors thought she was a gonner – until she came back to life, with a story to tell. In the cold moments when she flat-lined, Cynthia says she left her body and entered a dark tunnel, where she met angels, who shared a message with her. She also encountered an all-consuming bright light while she was dying. Near-death experience commonalities: 

Did this really Did this really happen? Her story is known as a near-death experience and has been widely reported throughout the country regardless of religious background, ethnicity, age or gender.

Teacher+coach = an 80-hour week

A large percentage of teachers have to have second jobs and many tend to take up coaching, but how does it affect them? What are the perks of coaching?

Assumptions vs. reality: Classroom budgets leave teachers to cover deficits

Instead of the harsh white light of the fluorescents, the light pouring from Alexa Weatherwax’s second grade classroom is the soft glow of old-fashioned incandescent string lights and paper lanterns she purchased for her classroom. This year, the only money Weatherwax spent out of pocket was on a travel Q-tip container for her students’ vocabulary words.

Weatherwax’s experience, however, is atypical and illustrates the starkness in realities between suburban and urban public schools, mostly White versus mostly Black school districts. According to the non-profit AdoptAClassroom.org’s national survey, 91 percent of teachers purchase school supplies for their students. The report goes on to say, on average, teachers in the United States spend $600 out of pocket each year on classroom supplies.

Memberships program fuel Old Town businesses

The Old Town Commercial Association has successfully implemented a membership program for more than two decades to increase community involvement while keeping foot-traffic coming to the shops. Starting in the late 1990s, Old Town’s individual and business membership programs have helped to keep those interested in being a part of the neighborhood coming back for more, OTCA board president, Jamie Schriner, said. “It helps to show their support for the community,” Schriner said. “It helps to bring in funding and resources, but then if they become members, it means that they’re going to come down here and support the community and support the businesses.”

For an individual, a membership allows you to receive discounts at participating shops, restaurants, and businesses. There are incentives that attract businesses to join like features of their business in newsletters.