Within Grand Traverse County are City Limits. The area inside here would be affected by the policy's of sanctuary status. 
Photo by Amy Davis.

Traverse City dilemma: “Sanctuary City” or not?

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. — Human Rights commissioners of Traverse City are allegedly looking to make the northwestern Michigan city more “immigrant-friendly.” One way of doing so would be to declare sanctuary status, or making TC known as a “Welcoming City.”

“There are jobs in Northern Michigan that need immigrants to take them,” says Mark Dixon, who has been a citizen of Traverse City for over 60 years. “Faming here, especially with the abundance of cherry crops, attracts a lot of immigrants, as well as some jobs at Munson, the local hospital.”

“This had never been an issue before (President Donald) Trump’s presidency,” says Dixon. “I think this is because he initially campaigned with restrictions to countries like Mexico by ‘building a wall’ across the border.”

Early in Trump’s presidency, an executive order attempted to withhold federal grants to sanctuary cities. However, at the end of April, a federal judge in San Francisco put a nationwide end to this.

Photos from the Lansing Sanctuary City movement

Following the election of President Trump and the advent of his harsh immigration policies, a nationwide movement was galvanized to declare certain cities as “Sanctuary Cities.” A Sanctuary City is one that declares its intention to not follow the federal government’s immigration regulations, through a city council resolution.

Chen was studying Fa Lun Gong book in her dormitory. ”I think I am different from other people. I do get in touch with Chinese culture. That’s because I practice Fa Lun Gong.”

Students deal with stereotypes while celebrating their Asian cultures

At Michigan State University, 5.8 percent students at the university are of an Asian heritage, according to the Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives 2015-16 annual report on diversity. That’s about 2,500 students. To understand what it’s like to be from an Asian racial background at Michigan State University, we interviewed three Asian American students — Sho Nakashima, Annie Chen, and Sarah Vang — and a student from China, Lei Xu. “For me, the most personally upsetting has been the stereotype that Asian immigrant families are privileged and wealthy,” said Nakashima, an MSU graduate who studied social relations and policy and neuroscience. He is a first-generation American.

The East Lansing School District present the reconstruction plans to the public.

East Lansing public schools bond proposal vote, May 2

In August 2016, the East Lansing Board of Education evaluated the city’s six public elementary school buildings. The board came up with a bond proposal to increase property tax millage in order to demolish and reconstruct five public elementary school buildings and renovate one, which will be voted on May 2, 2017.