3 Michigan artists speak about 3 musical cultures and genre loyalty

Music streaming services are the future and they’re redefining what people listen to, yet genre loyalty remains. In 2016, Nielsen, a company that studies consumer habits worldwide, found a 76 percent increase in on-demand audio streams. These services, like Spotify and Apple Music, have algorithms designed to help listeners instantly customize their musical preferences. And the rigid boundary lines that once delineated genres seem to be less strict – more people are listening to varied music. Broadcasting platforms like radio are also taking notice. “I’m always looking to some degree.

African Americans opinions on media description

Names matter: Minorities unhappy with the way they are described in the media

“I think people should be more conscience and more sensitive to the fact that all people aren’t just black because they have dark skin,” said Kenny Lacy, an African-American student athlete at the University of California – Los Angeles. “ People need to learn that race is more than just colors.”  

Over the years, our perception of how we define race has been generally described by a color instead of ethnicity. Being African-American is being “black” while being Caucasian is being “white”. Racial identification is often viewed as a sensitive topic due to inappropriate or incorrect categorization of one’s ethnicity. Listen to the full interview with Lacy below:

Media portrayals of different groups also has an impact on how society views them and at times people will alert journalists of the way they prefer to be called, said Scott Pohl, a reporter and host of WKAR’s Current State.

Trump Twitter head shot

Media members react to Trump’s call for an end to anonymous sourcing

President Trump called for the media to stop their use of anonymous sources during the annual Conservative Political Action Conference this year. “They shouldn’t be allowed to use sources unless they use somebody’s name,” Trump said. “Let them (the source) say it to my face.”

Journalists and professors at Michigan State said anonymous sources are important for reporters, even though they should only be used as a last resort. According to Journalism Professor Sue Carter, anonymous sourcing isn’t the preferred method of reporting but sometimes it’s the only way to get information for a story. “When a source asks to be anonymous, try to encourage them to go on record, don’t accept anonymity out the gate,” Carter said.

Williamston roads

Poor road conditions impact local communities

With winter quickly coming to an end, Michigan’s residents face with new hazards as the roads continue to deteriorate. Alan Dolley, the city manager of Williamston, said it is concerning to see the city’s roads degrading every year. “The funding just isn’t there,” said Dolley. “When I talk about road repairs in the city of Williamston, it’s not just the surface of the road but it is also the structures underneath the roads.”

You can listen to the full interview with Dolley below. https://soundcloud.com/troy-rose-283533318/recording

The renovation to completely fix Williamson’s roads would cost approximately half a million dollars, but Dolley said it is impossible right now for the city to get this whole amount at once.

Landscape view of the Michigan State Capitol in downtown Lansing.

Majority wants more protection from a Lansing sanctuary city proposal

The Lansing City Council voted to table a resolution that would reaffirm Lansing’s status as welcoming city to immigrants and refugees on Feb.13. The resolution was scrapped not because the council didn’t want to pass legislation, but largely due to public demand for more protection under the proposition. See below for the full proposal. The meeting drew a crowd so large that a viewing area was set up in the lobby to accommodate more people. “I’ve been on the council for a year and in that time I have never seen a crowd at a council meeting that large,” said Council Member Kathie Dunbar.

Terry Canty

Local activists weigh in on President Trump

Non-profit organizers in Detroit are anxious about the new president’s policies and how they will affect their activism. Terry Canty, founder of the Triple T Foundation, an organization that helps at-risk youth, said he is worried about the uncertainty around the new administration. “You never know what he’s going to do,” Canty said. “They always cut the programs for the kids in the inner city.”

You can watch the full interview with Canty below. https://youtu.be/DdurxSrMI-c

The foundation has helped many young men like Kareem Johnson, who expressed his love for the boxing training he gets at Triple T. But having someone like Trump in office didn’t leave a positive mindset for Johnson and the future of the organization.

Meridian voters visit polls early

The majority of precincts in Meridian saw high voter turnout during the first hour that polls were open. In Precinct 1, there was a 40-45 minute wait during the first hour, and in Precinct 5 nearly 10 percent of registered voters turned out then. “During that period, we had about a minute per voter,” said Precinct 1 chairwoman Beverly Stephens. “Right now, we have 697 ballots.”

“In the first 50 minutes, 160 people came in,” said Precinct 5 chairman Jim Brazier. “We are approaching about 700 votes.”

One challenge during early hours voting was the ballot tabulator jamming and saying the ballot was defective.