Stretch marks: Why are they such a big deal?

According to a Kids Health article, stretch marks produce when the skin is pulled by rapid growth or stretching. They are a natural phenomena that happens over time to everyone, no matter what shape or size you are, and there’s really no stopping them from appearing. If this is the case, why are they made to be such a big deal when they appear? Michigan State dietetics junior Valerie Wolfe said she thinks stretch marks are seen as a negative trait due to society’s views on beauty. “I remember as a kid, I felt so self conscious of my stretch marks because all of my friends were skinny and didn’t have any,” Wolfe said.

Social media affects millennials’ body perception

According to a Statista survey conducted to show the amount of the U.S. population with a social media profile from 2008 to 2017, the percentage has skyrocketed from 24 percent to now 81 percent. Social media is useful for a variety of things in our daily lives; whether it be getting in contact with someone for work or personal purposes, retrieving your news, etc. On the other hand, you also must consider how it can affect millennials, specifically teenagers, from a self-esteem perspective. All over social media outlets such as Instagram and Snapchat, you typically see a mass amount of pictures of different socialites that are depicted as the “perfect human” – for example, fit and toned bodies, long hair on women, expensive clothes, perfect skin, etc. High school junior Sarah Anderson says these types of people that seem to be displayed all over social media can take a toll on people’s body perception.

Size categories in the modeling world

In the modeling industry, most designers make clothes in sample sizes 00 to 2, meaning they automatically expect all the models from modeling agencies to be that size. However, what happens when it comes to the models that are considered “plus sized”? “Plus size” clothing is a term that is generally applied to an individual that is above average to larger in body size. This clothing option can be seen as very resourceful, but sometimes is given a negative stigma. Kjerstin Gruys, assistant professor of sociology at University of Nevada, frequently explores the relationship between physical appearance and social inequality and said the titles are nothing new.

Can dressing to impress go too far?

EAST LANSING, Mich. — The so-called “unwritten rule” behind nights where college students gather over drinks is that some young women tend to dress more provocatively than they do on a typical everyday basis. About four out of five women who responded anonymously to an informal Spartan Newsroom poll said that when they go out to the bars, they generally choose their outfits with the goal of receiving attention; preferably from males. During the entirety of a regular school week, you will typically see women in college in their comfortable sweatshirts and sweatpants; for the most part not fully caring about their appearances as much as they would for a night out. Once it’s nighttime is when the risqué outfits come into appearance.

Blocking social media in school

In the age of social media, teachers are trying to find ways to get students to pay more attention to their in class and less attention to their phones. Many schools block students from going onto social media on the school computers. Some schools make it so when students log onto their wifi, they can not go onto any social media even on their phones. Is this an invasion of a student’s rights or privacy when it comes to their own phones? However, there are some schools that believe it won’t end distractions.

Viral romances provide an enviable highlight reel

#RelationshipGoals can serve as a positive standard to set relationships to — but also pose as a risk for unhealthy comparisons

 

Couples with vast followings on social media can project a flawless image of what a relationship looks like. Physical attractiveness. Health and fitness. Luxury. But social media users’ potential overexposure to these seemingly-effortless relationships on millions of’ timelines could be raising the standards for relationships.

Graphic depicting a "no peanuts" sign against an orange, polka dot background.

Teachers face the pressure of student allergies

Early education instructor Dayle McLeod was prepped this fall to begin her new position as Head Start’s lead teacher at Potterville Elementary School in Potterville, Mich. With six years of professional experience under her belt, she knew just how to ready her classroom for her newest batch of preschool students: Her lesson plans were organized, her classroom supplies purchased, her bulletin boards constructed. She was prepared for everything — or so she thought. Not long before the first day of class, McLeod was informed she would be responsible for a student with maple syrup urine disease, a rare genetic disorder in which the body cannot break down certain proteins. “At first, it was really stressful,” McLeod said.