Kean’s Candy Shoppe, established in 1928 and located in downtown Mason, pictured.

Mason ice cream and candy store remains unfazed by technology

MASON — While data shows less and less people have time to go out shopping these days, family-owned ice cream and candy shops remain flourishing with customers and life. “Until they figure out a way to have a drone deliver a handcrafted chocolate malt, I think we’re going to be all right,” joked Shawn Sodman, owner of The Daily Scoop. Sodman and his wife Kathy have been owning and operating the ice cream parlor for seven years and offer a wide variety of ice cream, milkshakes, malts, sundaes and even grilled cheese. All of the ice cream and cheese is provided courtesy of the MSU Dairy Store. “Me and my softball team try to go to the Daily Scoop after every game,” said 11-year-old Samantha Bennett.

Two paraders are pictured with one of the protestors during the Michigan Pride March at the Capitol Building, East Lansing, Michigan on June 17, 2017.

Lansing a long-time center of Michigan LGBTQ advocacy

The well-known cities with gay history are always New York and San Francisco, however, the small cities, including Lansing, all play the important role in the process of legalizing homosexual marriage. Lansing is one of the most open-minded cities for the LGBTQ community in Michigan. A lot of LGBTQ groups and marches in Michigan were first started in Lansing. On June 17, a crowd was gathered at the Capitol Building to show their LGBTQ pride. The Michigan Pride March history goes back to 1990.

Mari Copeny has earned of nickname, Little Miss Flint

Little Miss Flint: The face of a community coping with crisis

FLINT, Mich. — A small city about 70 miles northwest of Detroit was thrust into mainstream media when it was revealed that residents water was tainted with lead and other contaminates dating back to 2014, when the city attempted to cut budgets, resulting in changing the water source from Detroit, to the Flint River. The water crisis has changed the lives of all city residents, but others say the crisis was a call to action. From public speaking and advocating to bringing awareness to the daily struggles of living with poisoned water, Flint resident Mari Copeny, 10, has become a social media sensation, making her the face,of her hometown and earning her the nickname, Little Miss Flint. “We have been advocating for all of the residents of Flint, but mostly for the kids.

Journalism at Michigan State University

Mixed feelings over Detroit’s new $187 million streetcar

DETROIT — The Motor City’s latest streetcar, the QLine, had its grand opening on May 12, 2017. It was the first time a streetcar rolled down the streets of Downtown in 61 years. Spectators from the city and suburbs alike made their way to the city to be the first to ride the trolley along its 6.6-mile loop. The excitement was shared by Detroit sports teams such as the Pistons, Tigers and Red Wings, who sent representatives to the event. There were giveaways, deals, and musical acts present to entertain the 8,300 trolley-goers.

University at Buffalo North Campus greenery

Is free college tuition in New York State a good idea?

BUFFALO, N.Y. — For many families around the country, college tuition can be a deciding factor when choosing a college. Tuition, room and board, travel costs and other expenses can add up when going to college, especially out-of-state. Has New York State finally found the solution to the burden that is college tuition? In April 2017, New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo passed a law that made college tuition free for certain students attending public universities. The program, named the Excelsior Scholarship, does not cover room and board or other fees and only applies to public universities, such as CUNY or SUNY.

Photo by Kayla Hinton

Traffic jams today, smooth driving tomorrow in Virginia

HAMPTON ROADS, Va. — Virginia is well known for many great things. It is the birthplace of a nation, it is home to the largest naval base in the world, and has mass amounts of fascinting history surrounding it. However, this commonwealth is also known for something not so great: its traffic. Resident of Virginia Beach, Nathan Olle, commented on the traffic issues he faces day to day.

Local businesses downtown Lansing. Photo by: Britney VanderKodde

Lansing setting a foundation for startup businesses

Economic growth has expanded in the city of Lansing and the city has become a prime location for entrepreneurship. The community has set a foundation of resources for startup companies in order to help new businesses thrive in the Lansing area. Neil Kane is an expert in entrepreneurship and startup companies as he is the director of undergraduate entrepreneurship at Michigan State University. In regards to the economic growth in Lansing, Kane said, “There’s a lot of development going on in the area, a lot of real estate development, new apartments going up. That’s got to be good news.”

In fact,  the Greater Lansing Association of Realtors market data shows that the number of active single-family, condominium and town home listings at the end of each month has increased in the last year.

Journalism at Michigan State University

Road work adds to the headaches of suburban Detroit commuters

STERLING HEIGHTS, Mich. — Some say that in Michigan that there are two seasons: winter and construction. There seems to be construction everywhere you turn around the Metro Detroit area. The newest project in the area is the construction on Hall Road or M-59 throughout Macomb County. The project was announced in early February and is said to be a two-year plan to improve road conditions and access to restaurants and businesses.

The Phi Kappa Psi house at the University of Washington. Photo by Chase Michaelson.

U. of Washington frats are for-rent to all in summer

SEATTLE — As the spring quarter winds down at the University of Washington in Seattle, finals are taken, last hoorahs are undergone, and goodbyes are shared. However, some people don’t feel like going home for the summer. For young women, the options include dilapidated dorms, expensive Seattle apartments … or frat houses. “I hate going home and I have a job here, but you can’t get an apartment for three months in Seattle,” explains junior Sydney Smith, a Public Health major from Reno, Nevada. “I’m actually not even in [Alpha Chi Omega] anymore, but I still like to live in.” For $475 total for the three months of summer, Smith lives with the brothers of Phi Kappa Psi.

Leslie Pielack, Director of the Birmingham Museum sitting in front of a collection of frontages from CREEM Magazine. Photo by Simone Fenzi.

Outreach, reputation keeps suburban Detroit museum relevant

BIRMINGHAM, Mich. — This Detroit suburb found itself standing in the center of one of the most diverse culinary scenes in Michigan. However, as people walk between the trafficked streets of this town to find the perfect restaurant, many don’t realize the importance of where they are standing. One person who is determined to tell the story of this small city is the Director of the Birmingham Museum, Leslie Pielack. She started this job 6 years ago when the museum was still called the Birmingham Historical Museum and Park.