MSU sophomore is making an impact as a mentor

The year is 2010. A young man, age 12, walks into the local liquor store on Detroit’s west side and buys 20 boxes of Mike and Ike candy. To the cashier this may look like a kid with an insatiable sweet tooth on his way to school, but to Andrei Nichols, this purchase would prove to be the root of his entrepreneurial future. “My very first business venture was in seventh grade when I started selling Mike and Ikes and Now and Laters, two for $1,” Nichols said. “I did that for a week and made $50 and said ‘I could get used to this.’ And after that I really started to like business.”

Nichols then began to ask his father, who is an entrepreneur, questions about how to start a business; the ins and outs of the business world.

One teen’s passion for developing apps

Hussein El Feky first became interested in programming when he was 13. What started out as a passion for building things, ended up developing into a love for program and application building. “At that point, I only learned a lot of basic concepts from random articles on the internet,” he said. Two years later, El Feky, of Cairo, Egypt, caught “the programming bug” and started getting serious about building phone apps, specifically for Android. “My first phone was an Android device, and I can easily say I fell in love with the operating system,” he said.

boy reading math book

Misconceptions of education, part two: homeschooling

Our education system has a large variety of ideas and practices. Some parents choose to send their children to public schools, some choose private or charter schools, while some parents choose to home school. This is part two of the ‘Misconceptions’ series, chronicling differences in our education system. If you would like to read part one, click here “Misconceptions of Public Schools.” Misconceptions of homeschooling
Sandra Datema and Telly Ryan are two mothers who chose to home-school their children.

boy and teacher reading

Misconceptions of education, part one: public schools

Our education system is changing. With the click of a button, kindergartners can access whatever information they want on the internet. Due to safety becoming a growing priority, signing out your child has seemingly become a ten-step process. Vending machines have been emptied to reduce childhood obesity. Teachers are expected to go back to school to earn their master’s while at the same time taking a pay cut.

Q&A: Is this the best time in America to look for a job?

On June 4, 2018, President Trump tweeted that now is the “best time ever to look for a job,” and that this is “the greatest economy in the history of America”. According to the Michigan Department of Technology, Management & Budget, this holds partially true. U.S. Jobless rates steadily declined in the last year, dropping from 4.4 to 3.9 percent from April 2017 to April 2018. Jim Rhein, an economic analyst at the Detroit branch of the Michigan Department of Technology, Management & Budget, gave his insight on the labor markets in Michigan and how job markets are performing at this time in the economy. Q: When it comes to the tweet that President Trump made, do you think that this holds true for Michigan specifically?

Incoming students are not worried about their safety, despite MSU’s recent scandals

Within the past few months, Michigan State University has taken heat for multiple scandals that put the university’s reputation in jeopardy. Recently, three former MSU football players were sentenced to 36 months of probation exactly one year after they were charged for sexual assault from a party that took place in January 2017. The university also has been left with a $500 million settlement from the Larry Nassar scandal, with $425 million to be paid to the 332 current survivors and $75 million put away in a trust fund for any future claimants. Even with the current state of events on campus, incoming freshman Lazarie Mitchell is not worried about how these events will affect her safety as a student. “I was not aware of the scandals when I applied, and I didn’t know anything about it,” she said.

“Yes Means Yes” legislation introduced in Michigan

Recently, news headlines across the United States have been jam-packed with stories about sexual assault. The #MeToo movement has been making a large splash for several months now. The case surrounding ex-sports doctor Larry Nassar has drawn national attention as several survivors of his sexual attacks came forward. Michigan State University has found itself at the forefront of discussion concerning on-campus sexual assault during recent months. The Nassar case has caused several university leaders to step down. Several reports about student athletes sexually assaulting other students have come out, giving the university a black eye that it certainly doesn’t want. All of these reports bring up questions surrounding sex education in public schools.

Cyberbullying now a heavier crime in Michigan thanks to new bill

Bullying someone online just became a much more serious offense in Michigan thanks to two bills passed by the House of Representatives. House Bills 5017 and 5018, which were passed on March 22, define cyberbullying as a misdemeanor offense punishable by up to 93 days in jail and a $500 fine.  The bills passed easily with votes of 91-17 and 92-17, respectively. The bill’s sponsor, Rep. Peter Lucido, R-Shelby Township, says the personal interaction of bullying is taken out when it is done through the internet. “Right now, you can’t prosecute someone for an internet crime,” Lucido said. “Police deal with these types of cases every day, and they want some help.”

GMOs– What’s the deal?

Health and wellness have been trending issues for years, but one thing that has gained more and more of the spotlight lately is the issue of GMO’s. In 2016, then President Barack Obama signed a law known as the National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard. This directs the United States Department of Agriculture to establish a national standard to disclose certain food products and ingredients that are “bioengineered.” So what exactly does that mean? Well, let’s start with the acronym. Amanda Littlefield, a Nutritionist at NuGrow Wellness, describes a GMO, in it’s simplest terms, as a genetically modified organism.

Concerts and the sister bond

Attending concerts has always been a popular pastime amongst teenagers. With school out for the summer, teens have more free time to hit up concerts. This is true for sisters Madison, 19, and Hannah Svoboda, 16. The two have plans to attend multiple concerts this upcoming summer. Madison has an incredible number of concerts she will be attending. Her concert attending begins with four in late June; three of which take place within a week. Her summer kicks off with a trip to Hershey, Pa., for a concert on June 14.