Building Twenty-One Reopens Skatepark, supplying opportunities for teens

By Ben Stram
The Mason Times
Workers at the arena

Some of the rails

More ramps
One of the biggest ramps
Almost a year ago an old run-down skate church and bike church were taken over by Building Twenty-One and the transformation impacted many.
With help from professional BMX rider Cory Wiergowski, renovations advanced and word spread.
That transformation was completed when the Mason Area Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors cut the ribbon Wednesday, Oct. 14, officially reopening the indoor skate park for students ages 8 and up. Continue reading

Share

Animal shelter tries to help dogs find homes in Dogtober

IMG_3527

By Cameron Dunlap
The Mason Times

The Ingham County Animal Control & Shelter will be hosting its first discounted dog adoption event called Dogtober, for the rest of October.

Dogtober, originally slated to begin Oct 15 was pushed to Oct 7 due to the Ingham shelter being out of room and overloaded with adoptable dogs.

All dogs for the rest of Dogtober will cost $30 to adopt compared to the original $100 price tag. The price decrease is thanks to a volunteer/sponsor for the shelter donating “a lot” of money to make-up for the difference, according to Ashley Hayes the volunteer and special events coordinator of the shelter.

Each adopted dog will come with a microchip, county license and rabies vaccination. Each adopted dog will also be neutered and spayed.

As of 3:30 p.m. Oct. 9, the shelter had helped seven dogs find new homes thanks to Dogtober.

Continue reading

Share

Native son returns to teach yoga

By Cameron Dunlap
The Mason Times

From Sept. 29 to Oct. 3 Mason native Toby Mohlman returned to his hometown to host yoga classes for the Mason community.

Toby Mohlman, who lived in Mason until he was 18, has since spent his years living in Colorado, Massachusetts and currently Cleveland.  He began practicing yoga in 2000 with his girlfriend as a form of physical therapy.  He liked it so much it inspired him to get a teaching certificate in yoga, which he just recently obtained. He was mostly looking forward to linking back up with old friends and seeing family, while doing something that means a lot to him.
Continue reading

Share

Mason Pizza Day a tasty school technology fundraiser

By Ben Stram
The Mason Times

The first Wednesday of each month during the school year, the city of Mason delivers a pizza promotion that helps shape the way its children develop.

The Mason Public Schools Foundation is a nonprofit fundraising organization established in 1984. The foundation committed to the Mason Technology Infusion Program, which provides technology for students in elementary school, middle school, and high school, to donate $30,000 per year for many years.

Local pizzerias donate $1 dollar per pizza to the foundation, which goes to supply students with technology in the classroom.
Continue reading

Share

Homecoming 2014: The Mason Way

IMG_7815By Ben Stram
The Mason Times

“Go Blue! Go Red!”

These are the colors of the Mason Bulldogs, who capped a successful homecoming Friday night in a win against Owosso, 42-7.

They’re also the colors the residents of Mason screamed at the annual homecoming parade and football game.

The town met in downtown Mason for the homecoming parade at 6 p.m. which was led by flashy cars, the Mason marching band, several children and cheerleaders.

Continue reading

Share

A Legacy Continued

By Emily Hummel
The Mason Times

Curtis Hertel Jr., candidate for Michigan State senate.

Curtis Hertel Jr., candidate for a Michigan senate seat.


A long-standing family legacy of reaching for positions in government is continued through Curtis Hertel Jr., a candidate for the Michigan Senate.

With a father who was speaker of the House from 1993 to 1994, an uncle who served six terms as a member of Congress and another who served three terms as a Michigan senator himself, Hertel had an interest in politics at a young age.

“I still remember going door to door with my dad and my little red wagon,” Hertel recalled of campaigning with his father.

Since 2009, Hertel has been working in Mason, Michigan, as Ingham County’s Register of Deeds, which will require a new person elected into the position. He was involved in the foreclosure crisis that occurred in Mason in past years and worked hard to make sure residents could keep their homes. Hertel was also an advocate for workers during the right to work vote.
Continue reading

Share

Rotary Exchange brings cultural diversity, growth to students

students2By Ben Stram
The Mason Times

The Rotary Youth Exchange program offers students the opportunity to learn about cultures from around the world.

The program is for both inbound and outbound students. Inbound students visit from a variety of countries while outbound students spend a year abroad.

Students must be in high school and maintain a certain grade-point average while participating in leadership activities at their high school to be a part of the program.

On Sept. 19, Rotary District 6360, a group composed of 12 inbound students from 11 countries, visited Chicago.
Continue reading

Share

State budget cuts impact Mason High School funding

By Micaela Colonna
Mason Times staff writer

Listen to an audio report.

The 2008 recession and state funding cuts have meant losses in almost all areas of Mason Public Schools. This has meant some trimming and searches for new revenue in many departments including academic, athletic, arts and personnel. Custodial groups have taken hourly wage cuts to prevent privatization, administrative and faculty positions were eliminated and district-funded sports have become self-funded. Shelbi Frayer, executive director of business and finance at Mason Public Schools, said the changes are a result of the decrease in state funding.

Mason tennis team

The Mason Varsity Tennis team practices indoors on a rainy school afternoon. They have experienced the impact of a decreased budget in the form of equipment cuts.

“We wouldn’t have to make such drastic changes such as losing HR if we didn’t have a cut in funding,” said Frayer. “We would definitely have a lot more programming for students, buses, etc. You learn to be more frugal and live without.”

With the assistance of teachers, Principal Lance Delbridge of Mason High School allocates funds allotted by the Mason Board of Education. Frayer said the focus is primarily on academics. If extracurricular activities such as sports want to expand, they have to do it on their own, as the district does not plan to add money to these budgets.

Greg Lattig, district athletic director of Mason High School, said 500 students at the high school play sports. He said the athletics department has had budget cuts of more than $100,000 over the past five years.

“We’ve cut coaching staff, lower-level programs, programs at the middle school, and some things have become self-funded,” said Lattig. “We’ve significantly reduced our equipment budget and eliminated two-way transportation.”
Continue reading

Share

New summer program to help students transition to high school

By Brian Bobal
Mason Times staff writer

Teaches Dean Thompson (left) and Jeremy Mills (right) discuss the Bridge Program at the April 21 school board meeting.

Teaches Dean Thompson (left) and Jeremy Mills (right) discuss the Bridge Program at the April 21 school board meeting.

This summer, a new academic program will start under the umbrella of Multi-Tiered Systems of Support called the Bridge Program. The program will help ease the transition for some students as they leave middle school and move up to high school.

Mason Public School Superintendent Mark Dillingham brought up the concept for the program.

“An outcome that I really wanted from the Bridge Program is for identified students to have a familiar face that they know, and can relate to at both the middle school and high school, while still being in 8th grade,” said Dillingham. “Also, I wanted these students to become familiar with the expectations of their new high school learning environment, and what better way than to spend a few weeks at the high school getting the lay of the land before school starts for their freshman year.” Continue reading

Share

Mason grocery store with sparkling ambience

Inside Kean’s grocery store in downtown Mason, lies is a jewelry shop filled with many unique pieces of homemade jewelry for all occasions. <Listen to the story>

It all started when Margaret Ross was eight years old. Even though she described herself as being a tomboy at a young age, she found her passion making jewelry, and is still doing it over 20 years later.

Photo of Margaret Ross

It wasn’t until four years ago however, that Margaret decided to market her business in the downtown Mason area, located right in the back of a family owned business known as Kean’s, a local store that has been in business for 85 years.

Putting her business in the back of Kean’s is what attracts a lot of Margaret’s customers into the store. Margaret says she often times jokes that she is like shopping for the milk and eggs when you’re at the grocery store, since her shop is located in the back.

Photo of Margaret Ross (1)

You wont find Margaret Ross’s jewelry at just any retail store, because all of the jewelry sold in her shop is personally handmade. As a musical artist in the local area, Sarah Geyer said she was right away attracted to the jewelry shop, expressing admiration to the background of how this jewelry is made.

Photo of Margaret Ross (2)

Even though Margaret lives in DeWitt, she still enjoys having her store in downtown Mason.

She even describes why her jewelry stop adds a little uniqueness to the downtown area.

 

 

 

 

Share