Tag Archives: grand ledge

The Sun Theater: 84 Years and Counting

By Meghan Steingold
Living In The Ledge

Located on the infamous Bridge Street, The Sun Theater has always been an emblem of the community.

Located on the infamous Bridge Street, The Sun Theater has always been an emblem of the community.

With one featured movie shown a week and its $2 seat prices, it’s a wonder how the Sun Theater can stay afloat after 84 years of business.

“It’s a cute small theater with really reasonable prices. It’s family-owned and very popular with the members of the community,” Grand Ledge resident Allison Osika said.

The theater’s owner of 26 years, Chuck Pantera, said that business has actually peaked recently due to the community’s desire to preserve the theater.

Opening in 1931, the theater at 361 Bridge St., hit its peak in the early years of being established, according to Pantera. However, it is a city emblem and one that is highly-recognized amongst the community.

“I go there typically once a month. It’s fun to have a movie outing every once in a while and we are always happy to support this historic business,” Grand Ledge resident Jay Miller said.

Legendary Bar has 100 years of History

By Emily Cervone
Living In the Ledge

“I swear, you could make a made-for-TV movie with the stuff that comes out of this place.”

Butch Bates, the day shift bartender at legendary Preston’s Bar in Grand Ledge, excused himself as he greeted his co-worker with a and bear hug. The bar just celebrated its centennial in 2014.

“The best thing about this town, and bar, is that no one has a real name,” said Bates. “I guess Grand Ledge is a cliquey town. I feel like people might be intimidated when they come in here. But they shouldn’t.”

Local Non-Profit is Anchor for Artist Community

Classes are held weekly at Ledge Craft Lane by multiple community artists

Classes are held weekly at Ledge Craft Lane by multiple community artists

By Emily Cervone
Living In The Ledge

Little did the citizens of Grand Ledge know, Marilyn Smith’s spring break of 1973 would forever change their town and the fate of an 130-year-old building waiting for demolition.

“It was a disaster,” said Smith. “There was plaster falling off the walls, it had been vacant for four years. It was unbelievable.”

Yet Smith had a dream after traveling to Grand Rapids for her spring break, where she met a few artists and took painting classes. Born and raised in Grand Ledge, that was the “only thing that was missing” from the town—a place to cultivate and support the arts.

“I was a full-time teacher, but I was interested in art,” said Smith. “I called people, got an attorney, a journalist, an artist, some volunteers and went to the city to reach an agreement on this building.”

Eventually, after some negotiating, Ledge Craft Lane was founded in 1975 by Smith, who is the current president of the non-profit business. Smith also is on the Grand Ledge Historical Society Board.

Yoor Mom Skate Shop: A Little Shack Doing Big Things

By Meghan Steingold
Living In The Ledge

Although largely unknown to the general public, the Yoor Mom Skate Shop is a unique business to the Grand Ledge community, with little recognition.

Being a little shack next door to the Sun Theater, the store at 320 S. Bridge St. exhibits very unique attributes that differ from those of the surrounding businesses. With old skateboards bolted up on the sides of the entrance, and graffiti along the side of the building, the shop is clearly geared toward the youth of Grand Ledge.

Shop owner Jerry Norris keeps the skateboards nailed up on the wall at all times for purchase and also for people to stop in just to gaze. The store also sells other skateboarding equipment.

Shop owner, Jerry Norris keeps the skateboards nailed up on the wall at all times for purchase and also for people to stop in just to gaze. The store also sells other skateboarding equipment.

Jerry Norris, the owner of the skate shop, opened the business May 13, 2012 because of his son Rain Norris and his friends.

“We are an incubator for skateboarding companies, so any kid that has an idea to start a skateboarding company whether it be t-shirts and apparel or making decks or being a photographer or videographer, they can come here and sell through here. We’re a skate shop, but we’re really a hang out for these kids,” said Jerry Norris.

Grand Ledge: what used to be the most popular resort destination of Michigan

By Ani Stamboulian
Living In The Ledge

Grand Ledge is one small town in Michigan that has been blessed in the geographical lottery department. The most important aspect of Grand Ledge is without a doubt its sandstone cliffs along Grand River. Most natives to Grand Ledge already know of this town’s golden age starting in the 1870s.

Renewing contract with City of Grand Ledge

By Jiabin Liu
Grand Ledge Gazette staff writer

GRAND LEDGE – Olson Farm renewed its leasing contract with City of Grand Ledge to rent tillable acreage at the Grand Ledge Abrams Municipal Airport.

Olsan Farm's Location on Google Map Photo by Jiabin Liu

Olsan Farm’s Location on Google Map
Photo by Jiabin Liu

Agreement

The Abrams Municipal Airport is on the edge of the City and has tillable vacant airport land.

Olson Farms has rented this tillable acreage at the Grand Ledge airport for the past three years and the Council renewed the contract for three more years on 14 April 2014.

Network would support more technology at Grand Ledge High School

A teacher at GLHS helps a student set her schedule for the next school year.

A teacher at GLHS helps a student set her schedule for the next school year.

By Mayara Sanches
Grand Ledge Gazette staff writer

Technology in schools video

GRAND LEDGE — Grand Ledge High School is working on its network system to expand the use of technology in classrooms.

While the high school’s network is not yet able to support a system, it offers many Apple products, like iPads and Macs, that rotate between the classes that need it.

“When the students are using the school network, we have to be careful so they don’t bring virus into our network,” said Brody Boucher, Grand Ledge School Board president. “We have the ability to block some content.”

Innovations

Since new cellphones and portable technological gadgets became popular, school officials believe that students should be able to find information quickly and have it at their fingertips.

Boucher said the high school wants to partly implement the “flipped classroom” model, in which the students find the information they need, and the teachers assist them in that area.

“We’re not there yet and we don’t know if we want to be like that all the time, but it’s a way for teachers to facilitate the learning,” he said.

Green infrastructure projects improve Grand Ledge recreation and quality of life

By Hannah Watts
Grand Ledge Gazette staff writer

GRAND LEDGE — Green infrastructure is increasingly relevant to Michigan, the region and the country. With five Great Lakes and two peninsulas, Michigan represents connectivity.

“Many people think green infrastructure has to do with just energy, but really green infrastructure is any infrastructure that is sensitive to the environment,” said Jon Bayless, Grand Ledge city administrator.

With green infrastructure improvements well underway in Grand Ledge, such as possible dam deconstruction, recreational trail extensions and rain gardens, community support is essential.

“The community has been very supportive of locally-initiated and state-mandated efforts to build and maintain a green infrastructure,” said Kalmin Smith, mayor of Grand Ledge. “The primary green interest of Grand Ledgers is to protect and improve the quality of water in the Grand River which flows through the city.”

Grand Ledge: Not your typical small town

By Melissa Delekta
Grand Ledge Gazette staff writer

GRAND LEDGE – When Mayor Kalmin Smith and his wife moved in 1996 from Okemos to Grand Ledge, they were looking for a small town feel. They found exactly what suited their style, and so have many others.

Grand Ledge residents enjoy Lick-ity Split on a spring day. Photo by: Melissa Delekta

Grand Ledge residents enjoy Lick-ity Split on a spring day. Photo by: Melissa Delekta

Mental health in teens at Grand Ledge High School

By Ariel Rogers
Grand Ledge Gazette staff writer

Students at Grand Ledge High School often are not aware of the counseling options available. Photo by Ariel Rogers

Students at Grand Ledge High School are often unaware of the counseling options available. Photo by Ariel Rogers

GRAND LEDGE — Grand Ledge High School has a student population nearing 1,800 ninth through 12th graders. Students are often overwhelmed with the stress of becoming an adult and planning the future.

Kathy Coscarelli is a licensed counselor in the Grand Ledge area. She receives referrals from GLHS for further counseling options for the students.

“Kids are so stressed about the future,” Coscarelli said. “They have no hope. Mom and dad are fighting.”

A study by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration surveyed people ages 12 through 17 if they experienced a major depressive episode in the past year. (In 2011, 8.2% of the people interviewed) experienced a depressed mood or loss in interest in daily activities that lasted more than two weeks in the past year.