Tag Archives: grand ledge

Renewing contract with City of Grand Ledge

By Jiabin Liu
Grand Ledge Gazette staff writer

GRAND LEDGE – Olson Farm renewed its leasing contract with City of Grand Ledge to rent tillable acreage at the Grand Ledge Abrams Municipal Airport.

Olsan Farm's Location on Google Map Photo by Jiabin Liu

Olsan Farm’s Location on Google Map
Photo by Jiabin Liu

Agreement

The Abrams Municipal Airport is on the edge of the City and has tillable vacant airport land.

Olson Farms has rented this tillable acreage at the Grand Ledge airport for the past three years and the Council renewed the contract for three more years on 14 April 2014.

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Network would support more technology at Grand Ledge High School

A teacher at GLHS helps a student set her schedule for the next school year.

A teacher at GLHS helps a student set her schedule for the next school year.

By Mayara Sanches
Grand Ledge Gazette staff writer

Technology in schools video

GRAND LEDGE — Grand Ledge High School is working on its network system to expand the use of technology in classrooms.

While the high school’s network is not yet able to support a system, it offers many Apple products, like iPads and Macs, that rotate between the classes that need it.

“When the students are using the school network, we have to be careful so they don’t bring virus into our network,” said Brody Boucher, Grand Ledge School Board president. “We have the ability to block some content.”

Innovations

Since new cellphones and portable technological gadgets became popular, school officials believe that students should be able to find information quickly and have it at their fingertips.

Boucher said the high school wants to partly implement the “flipped classroom” model, in which the students find the information they need, and the teachers assist them in that area.

“We’re not there yet and we don’t know if we want to be like that all the time, but it’s a way for teachers to facilitate the learning,” he said.

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Green infrastructure projects improve Grand Ledge recreation and quality of life

By Hannah Watts
Grand Ledge Gazette staff writer

GRAND LEDGE — Green infrastructure is increasingly relevant to Michigan, the region and the country. With five Great Lakes and two peninsulas, Michigan represents connectivity.

“Many people think green infrastructure has to do with just energy, but really green infrastructure is any infrastructure that is sensitive to the environment,” said Jon Bayless, Grand Ledge city administrator.

With green infrastructure improvements well underway in Grand Ledge, such as possible dam deconstruction, recreational trail extensions and rain gardens, community support is essential.

“The community has been very supportive of locally-initiated and state-mandated efforts to build and maintain a green infrastructure,” said Kalmin Smith, mayor of Grand Ledge. “The primary green interest of Grand Ledgers is to protect and improve the quality of water in the Grand River which flows through the city.”

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Grand Ledge: Not your typical small town

By Melissa Delekta
Grand Ledge Gazette staff writer

GRAND LEDGE – When Mayor Kalmin Smith and his wife moved in 1996 from Okemos to Grand Ledge, they were looking for a small town feel. They found exactly what suited their style, and so have many others.

Grand Ledge residents enjoy Lick-ity Split on a spring day. Photo by: Melissa Delekta

Grand Ledge residents enjoy Lick-ity Split on a spring day. Photo by: Melissa Delekta

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Mental health in teens at Grand Ledge High School

By Ariel Rogers
Grand Ledge Gazette staff writer

Students at Grand Ledge High School often are not aware of the counseling options available. Photo by Ariel Rogers

Students at Grand Ledge High School are often unaware of the counseling options available. Photo by Ariel Rogers

GRAND LEDGE — Grand Ledge High School has a student population nearing 1,800 ninth through 12th graders. Students are often overwhelmed with the stress of becoming an adult and planning the future.

Kathy Coscarelli is a licensed counselor in the Grand Ledge area. She receives referrals from GLHS for further counseling options for the students.

“Kids are so stressed about the future,” Coscarelli said. “They have no hope. Mom and dad are fighting.”

A study by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration surveyed people ages 12 through 17 if they experienced a major depressive episode in the past year. (In 2011, 8.2% of the people interviewed) experienced a depressed mood or loss in interest in daily activities that lasted more than two weeks in the past year.

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Going back to work after retiring

By Jiabin Liu
Grand Ledge Gazette staff writer

Lansing State Journal logo founded online

Lansing State Journal logo founded online

GRAND LEDGE – Alan Miller works as a part-time reporter at Lansing State Journal after twice of his retirements.

Alan Miller covers Grand Ledge City government for the weekly newspaper ̶ Grand Ledge Independent and sometimes the Lansing State Journal.

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Debating on amending the Zoning District Map

By Jiabin Liu

Grand Ledge Gazette staff writer

The City Council Meeting at Grand Ledge City Hall by Jiabin Liu

The City Council Meeting at Grand Ledge City Hall
by Jiabin Liu

GRAND LEDGE – the Grand Ledge City Council held a public hearing about an ordinance amending the Zoning District Map on March 24.

The Planning Commission did not approve the rezoning because they were concerned about traffic entering M-100 along the driveway and M-43 (Saginaw Highway) through the parking lot of the existing Doty Professional Building that faces Saginaw Highway.

The majority people in the Planning Commission voted in opposition to the rezoning plan on building 30 apartments in three building.

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May 3 Victorian Days event preparations are almost complete

By Mayara Sanches

Grand Ledge Gazette Reporter

GRAND LEDGE — The preparation for the Victorian Days, a cultural event in Grand Ledge, is underway, and many performers, venues — all around the city’s downtown street — and activities are reserved and set for the festival’s May 3 date.

Shatzie Lee (left) and Sylvania Dye dress in Victorian dresses at one of the committee's fundraising events.

Shatzie Lee (left) and Sylvania Dye dress in Victorian dresses at one of the committee’s fundraising events. Photo by Mayara Sanches

Since the committee who puts on the event uses it to show residents the city’s historical background, many of the activities are the same as the previous years, but they always find something different that could bring more audience into the all-day event, like the Victorian Ball — a 2013s creation.

“It’s a historical festival, so when you come, you learned who lived in the era and their tradition,” said Shatzie Lee, a planning committee member.

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Possible grant puts Grand Ledge family’s home in question

by Ariel Rogers

Grand Ledge Gazette staff writer

GRAND LEDGE – The Grand Ledge City Council held a public hearing on Monday about the city’s application for a Natural Resources Trust Fund Grant. The city is submitting the grant application for more boat launch improvements and for the purchase of lot 49.

Lot 49 includes the home and land belonging to Sara and Ralph Rounds. The house has been in Ralph’s family since the 1950s when his father and Louis Dible built the home.

Council member Thomas Sowle said in 2013, the city was awarded a grant of $150,000 along with a $50,000 match from the city for redesigning the boat launch. City administrator John Bayless said it is now necessary for additional parking to accomodate the boat launch.

The parking lot for the Jaycee Park boat launch. Photo by Ariel Rogers.

The parking lot for the Jaycee Park boat launch. Photo by Ariel Rogers.

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City council seeks new city administrator

By: Halie Woody

Grand Ledge Gazette staff writer

Lead executive recruiter from the Michigan Municipal League, Kathie Grinzinger pitches what the MML will do as a recruiter.

Lead executive recruiter from the Michigan Municipal League, Kathie Grinzinger pitches what the MML will do as a recruiter.

GRAND LEDGE- The city council met Monday night with the Michigan Municipal League to discuss recruitment options for a new city administrator.

 

After serving as city administrator for 15 years, Jon Bayless has announced his retirement. With Bayless, leaving the search for his replacement has begun.

 

The lead executive recruiter, Kathie Grinzinger, gave an in depth presentation as to how the recruiting process will go if the council chooses to hire the MML to find a replacement.

 

“Choosing an administrator is one of the most important things you can do during your time on city council,” said Grinzinger.

 

The recruitment process generally takes up to 90 days and the most basic package costs $8,000. The council will work with Grinzinger to create a profile in which they would like to see the next administrator fit that incudes, skills, knowledge and attributes.

 

Challenges of choosing a new administrator

 

While the recruiting process has proven to be beneficial for local governments there are some challenges in keeping the customer satisfied.

 

“Sometimes folks think it should happen so quickly,” Grinzinger said. “People make a list of all these things they want in a candidate and expect to get all of them.”

 

Grinzinger says, “Keeping expectations realistic,” is the most difficult part to the process.

 

The council has not confirmed whether they will be going through with the MML for the recruitment, but all council members seem to be in favor of doing so.

 

MML beneficial to council’s organization

City council members met at city hall to discuss how they will choose the new city administrator

City council members met at city hall to discuss how they will choose the new city administrator

Council member, Sue Roberts, went through a recruiting process about 20 years ago in Mason to choose a new super intendant. During this time, a recruiting agency wasn’t hired and the outcome was very messy.

 

“The screening process wasn’t there and there wasn’t enough background check,” Roberts said. “It was gruesome.”

 

The council has used the MML 15 years ago when they hired Bayless, which proved to be successful.

 

“15 years ago we went through the MML and it came down to Jon and some other guy,” Mayor Kalmin Smith said. “We were so close to picking the other guy but went for Jon and it’s been a great decision.”

 

Furthermore, Bayless agrees that the best option for finding his replacement is through the MML. He says that it’s more organized and will take less time.

 

“It kind of takes the politics out of it,” Bayless said.

 

The council’s final decision is looking to be pursuing recruitment through the MML.

 

 

 

You can contact the reporter for more information at woodyhal@msu.edu

 

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