One of the potholes on Townsend Street. Photo by Lukas Eddy

Lousy roads can cost Lansing residents more than just taxes

You’re driving to work with your eyes peeled for texting teenagers, but in the dim morning light you can’t make out a new pothole before it swallows one of your front wheels in a single, expensive blow. Similar experiences can cost other Lansing residents anywhere from $60 to over $800 for repairs ranging from front end alignments to new wheel replacements and more. Potholes can be the results of salting the roads over winter and harsh fall and spring refreezing conditions. In extremely low winter temperatures road salt loses it’s effectiveness, so the melted ice water that flows into small cracks in the pavement can freeze and expand, weakening the road structure. In the fall and spring when temperatures fluctuate around the freezing point, water flows into small spaces where it freezes and expands, damaging the road.

Holt Road reconstruction project OKd by township, scheduled for this fall

By Roya Burton and Jalen Smith
Holt Journal Staff Reporters

In order to improve traffic circulation on Holt Road between Grovenburg Road and Aurelius Road, Delhi Township officials have approved plans to resurface and repave that 3.1 mile stretch of road this fall. Throughout Holt Road west of Eifert Road to Aurelius Road, and Grovenburg Road four-lane segments will soon be converted to three lanes, with a lane going each direction, and the middle designated as a left-turn lane. The proposed project will also stretch down to Holt High School on the intersections of Washington and Eifert. They will replace the three light traffic signal with a traffic light that includes a left hand arrow. At the beginning or end of a school day turning left or right out of the high school is difficult when the when the traffic is the most congested.

Main Meridian-to-Lansing link of Michigan Avenue in need of repairs

By Julie Campbell
Meridian Times Staff Reporter

Damaged roads seem to be a huge problem across Michigan, one that grows over time. It’s almost as if potholes and bumps on the roads are a way of life for all Michigan residents. Although there are often efforts to repair these problems, there is one street — the main route between Meridian Township and Lansing — that seems to have been left behind on the road repair list: Michigan Avenue. Michigan Avenue is supposed to be the fastest, easiest route from Meridian Township to Sparrow Hospital in Lansing for the Meridian Township Fire and EMS, something needs to be fixed. If they have trouble getting to the desired location to help those in need, they’re going to have to find a different, longer route.

Smear, don't swerve: Holt residents should be cautious of deer while driving

By Anna Shaffer
Holt Journal Staff Reporter

If you’ve ever driven in Michigan, you have probably come across a deer or two. In Holt, like cities all across the state, drivers need to be mindful of deer crossing the street while driving. According to the 2014 Michigan Traffic Crash Facts Report released by the Michigan Office of Highway Safety Planning, there were 45,690 vehicle-deer crashes in 2014. As a result of those collisions, 1,072 people were injured and six people were killed. Holt resident Robert Sandoval said his next-door neighbor’s son was killed trying to avoid a deer while driving, and just last week a high-school aged student hit a power line near his home while swerving to avoid a deer.

Are you reading this while driving? Well, stop.

By Katie Dudlets
The Meridian Times Staff Reporter

Meridian Township resident Lexi Lambdin has continuously seen distracted drivers while on the road. “There’s so many careless drivers out there with the texting and driving,” Lambdin said. “I can’t tell you how many times I’m on the road and I look over and the person next to me has their phone in their hand, and they’re not even looking at the road.”

Police see lots of the same thing, even though it’s against the law. “Even though there’s a law against texting and driving, we still see it,” Meridian Township Police Chief David Hall said. “I have a tendency to think that people think ‘well, it’s a risk worth taking – I don’t see any police officers, so … ’ You still see [phones] out a lot.

Woman in DeWitt Township arrested for alleged drugged driving

By Cydni Robinson
Clinton County Chatter Staff Reporter

DEWITT — Driving under the influence doesn’t simply mean drunk driving. Prescription drugs can also impair a driver, something a 27-year-old woman allegedly learned the hard way earlier this month. The woman was arrested by DeWitt Township police for operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of drugs after an alleged hit-and-run with a mailbox on March 5, police officials said. Driving under the influence doesn’t only deal with illegal drugs and alcohol, it includes any mood or mind-altering substance, says Diana Julian, substance abuse/program manager and counselor at McAlister Institute. Julian says being aware that driving under the influence involves prescription drug abuse is very important.

Potholes are everywhere. The money to fix them is not.

By Kelly Sheridan
The Meridian Times Staff Reporter

Every year when the weather changes from winter to spring, potholes become more and more prevalent. They damage cars and cause serious hazards for many populated roads. In a state that has one of the worst reputations for roads, Meridian Township is no different. For Jeff Liska, the potholes are a burden, but he understands it’s because of where he lives. “The roads are terrible,” the Okemos resident said.

Despite $1.2 billion state road fund, don’t expect better Lansing streets this year

By Alexander Smith
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder’s signing of a $1.2 billion road funding package in 2015 is good news for Michigan’s roads. Most notably, the package will raise the fuel tax and the cost of vehicle registration to put toward road repair. For Lansing’s streets, those repairs are long overdue. “They’re okay, they could use some improvement though,” said Preston Nowsch, 22. “I know every day coming down Grand River, I have to be in a particular lane to miss out on a pothole.”

Lansing adopted the Pavement Surface Evaluation & Rating System in 2002 to grade local roads.

Road salt still a go-to for wintery Lansing roads, but city eyeing a change

By Alexander Smith
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

Road salt is one of the state’s top tools to keep cars on the road during winter, but for how much longer? In Lansing, it’s still an important tool in the city’s snow removal program. “Generally speaking, we’ll apply salt down to maybe 10 degrees, then we’ll apply what’s called a sand-salt mix, because salt will not react if the temperature gets too cold,” said Public Service Director Chad Gamble. “It’ll just be rocks on the roadway, which is no good.”

Gamble said even though some streets are left unsalted, major plow operations use 200 to 300 tons of the sand-salt mix. “We don’t apply salt to all 400 miles of neighborhood streets, it’s somewhat of a waste of money,” said Gamble.