Time run's out on meter before owner can return to pay again.

Downtown parking rates subject to a July 1 review

Whether it be a regular weekday or a special event like this most recent St. Patrick’s Day, parking in downtown has proven to be affordable and plentiful. With the implementation of pay -y-plate parking meters in recent years, by the Lansing Parking Services Department, the city continues to make an effort to simplify parking for citizens while effectively eliminating the old-school coin meters. Aside from the high-tech improvements a significant amount of parking lots and garages that offer convenient and economical options. “At times it can be a bit difficult finding a parking spot at one of the meters, but there are also parking lots available with plenty of spaces,” said Mrs. L. Vinson, a state employee.” “I work downtown and pay a monthly fee to have designated parking in a lot with in and out privileges.”

However good the prices or availability may be, there is still one problem that persists.

Williamston roads

Poor road conditions impact local communities

With winter quickly coming to an end, Michigan’s residents face with new hazards as the roads continue to deteriorate. Alan Dolley, the city manager of Williamston, said it is concerning to see the city’s roads degrading every year. “The funding just isn’t there,” said Dolley. “When I talk about road repairs in the city of Williamston, it’s not just the surface of the road but it is also the structures underneath the roads.”

You can listen to the full interview with Dolley below. https://soundcloud.com/troy-rose-283533318/recording

The renovation to completely fix Williamson’s roads would cost approximately half a million dollars, but Dolley said it is impossible right now for the city to get this whole amount at once.

One of the potholes on Townsend Street. Photo by Lukas Eddy

Lousy roads can cost Lansing residents more than just taxes

You’re driving to work with your eyes peeled for texting teenagers, but in the dim morning light you can’t make out a new pothole before it swallows one of your front wheels in a single, expensive blow. Similar experiences can cost other Lansing residents anywhere from $60 to over $800 for repairs ranging from front end alignments to new wheel replacements and more. Potholes can be the results of salting the roads over winter and harsh fall and spring refreezing conditions. In extremely low winter temperatures road salt loses it’s effectiveness, so the melted ice water that flows into small cracks in the pavement can freeze and expand, weakening the road structure. In the fall and spring when temperatures fluctuate around the freezing point, water flows into small spaces where it freezes and expands, damaging the road.

Bill would define drone misdemeanors

By RAY WILBUR Capital News Service LANSING — Michigan drone operators are split on how a Senate bill aimed at regulating the use of their unmanned aerial vehicles could impact their work. The bill, sponsored by Sen. Pete MacGregor, R-Rockford, … Continue reading →
Transportation engineer of AECOM Sean Kelsch addresses the crowd during the CATA Bus Rapid Transit presentation on Oct. 4, 2016 at Allen Neighborhood Center at 1611 E. Kalamazoo St. in Lansing, Mich.

Lansing, East Lansing, Meridian review CATA’s rapid transit plan

Capital Area Transportation Authority held three meetings to present modifications of its Bus Rapid Transport project to the public during the first week of October. The ideas are in response to community input at meetings in August. “The purpose of these meetings is for us to respond to the public. They raised a number of concerns with the current design, and said ‘we don’t like the way it is currently designed,’” CATA Assistant Executive Director Debbie Alexander said. “So we came back with some preliminary thinking to address those concerns.”

Current plan
The current BRT plan runs from the capital to Meijer and the Meridian Mall in Okemos.