Violent crime in Ingham County still prevalent

Violent crime totals have remained consistent in Ingham County, fluctuating higher and lower since 1998. According to a crime analysis report conducted by the Criminal Justice Information center, Ingham County was number seven on highest reported violent crime rates in Michigan compared to all 83 counties. “When we talk about violent crime, you’re often talking about persons who do it over and over again, so it’s not like it’s a bunch of different people who are committing violent crime,” said Dr. David Carter, a criminal justice professor at Michigan State University. Violent crime is defined by the FBI as “aggressive acts causing serious harm to an individuals and include aggravated assault, rape, robbery and homicide,” according to an Ingham County Health Department document. Since 1998, the totals have risen in violent crime offenses within the county to 2014, according to the Uniform Crime Reporting Statistics.

Following Parkland, DeWitt High School starts active shooter drill classes with police and fire departments

DeWitt High School has started a program of classes with township fire department and police department staff to help prepare students and teachers in the case of an active shooter situation, Fire Chief Dave DeKorte announced during the  DeWitt Township Board of Trustees meeting on March 12. DeKorte, who leads the instruction in the classes, said the planning process had been going on for the last couple months, but the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, helped expedite the process. “With everything going on, it just kind of made the ball roll a little faster,” said DeKorte. The program is a daily occurrence, running between 45 minutes to an hour long, where the fire and police personnel visit three different classrooms to give formal instruction on what options they have when an active shooter is present. “Basically, teaching them: if you can, you run; if you can’t, then it’s lockdown in the room, you barricade the door; you get ready to counter, where you’re going to basically throw whatever you can at them; and swarm the person if they come in the room, and then hold them down until we get there,” DeKorte said.

Watch Focal Point: CMU shooting, flooding in IM West and more

John Engler has been interim president for less than a month, we take a look at how students think he’s handling his new position. Also, the ‘Bern’ is back. Plus, the Ski Club had to make a tough decision when it came to one of their annual traditions. In sports, we head over to Skandalaris Football Center for the football teams first spring practice.

We Will Not Be Ignored

On a morning where members of the MSU community they thought they would be a part of a conversation, they ended up in a crowd outside. Inside the Hannah Administration building, the Board of Trustees were making decisions that didn’t sit well with many. 

Ingham County is looking to replace its aging jail

MASON — There is a long-overdue need for Ingham County to replace their deteriorating jail facility. The discussion is a standing item on the county commission agenda, as a plan is in the works to efficiently make the necessary moves to put it in motion. A significant part of the jail was built in 1964, making those areas 54 years old, and has never been closed once during that span. “We passed our MDOC (Michigan Department of Corrections) inspection last year without being cited, which according to the inspectors was a modern day miracle,” said county Sheriff Scott Wriggelsworth. To put things in perspective, according to Wriggelsworth, the jail is the oldest large jail in Michigan, and is seventh-oldest overall, amongst the total 83 jails in the state.

Did MSU’s Nassar scandal tarnish East Lansing’s reputation?

As Michigan State University continues to confront the effects of the Larry Nassar scandal, the surrounding community weighs in on whether the fallout could damage East Lansing’s reputation. Michigan State University is experiencing faculty resignations, disciplinary action, and ongoing investigation in the wake of its association with a sexual abuse scandal involving over 250 victim reports nationally. For East Lansing, the home city of MSU, collateral damage is still being assessed. “Obviously, people are thinking about the issue,” said Kathy Schaefer, a partner with Communications and Research, Inc., a public relations firm in East Lansing. “It’s in their minds.