It’s time to pick up leaves in DeWitt

Every fall, the community of DeWitt partake in the Fall Leaf Pick Up Program. The Fall Leaf Pick Up Program is a citywide program that begins each year with a city wide sweep in early October and will continue until the final week of November. Even though it is not a mandatory program, however it’s encouraged for community members to get involved. If residents are looking to burn their leaves instead of leaving them on the curb of your house, it’s prohibited. The City’s Fire Prevention Code prohibits the open burning of grass clippings and leaves.

Michigan optometrist helps the world see

By CASEY HULL Capital News Service LANSING — Thirty-one years ago, Nelson Edwards decided to see the world. Since then, he has helped the rest of the world see. While studying optometry at Ferris State University, Edwards joined Volunteer Optometric … Continue reading →

DeWitt residents go all-out for Halloween

Trick-or-treating wasn’t the only Halloween activity on DeWitt’s to-do list for the holiday.  DeWitt takes Halloween to the next level by incorporating a weekend-long house decoration contest into the festivities. “It’s to really thank the people in the community for going all out and decorating at holiday time,” said Loretta Spinrad, from the DeWitt Area Chamber of Commerce.  “So, we have a contest to get other residents to go out and look at the decorations.  We award winners basically to say thank you.”

“Some of those houses that are decorated are phenomenal,” said Spinrad.  “Some of these people go all out, and it’s just unbelievable where are this stuff comes from and how much they’ve invested in this.  Some of them have smoke, lights, moving objects, and sound.”

This year only 10 houses were entered into the contest. This number is a decrease from the previous year, which was 18.  However, the lower number of houses in the contest didn’t take away from homeowners showing their Halloween spirit and taking part in the festivities.  DeWitt Residents, Arlyn and Stuart King, have fully embraced the contest and are intending on taking home the prize this year. “We love Halloween,” said Stuart King.  “Halloween brings the community together, and I was hoping the contest would help bring people through.”

The Kings’ yard is one of the most creative, with everything being built by hand.  The props and characters in the haunted house move via electric motors and tell a creative story to go along with it to make it even more unique. “I think a really fun part of Stuart’s creations is that they are unique,” said Arlyn King.  “You can’t purchase them anywhere because they come out of his imagination.  A lot of the items are found items, and we find things that people threw out and we incorporate it.”

“We chose the theme haunted house,” said Stuart King.  “Once that was selected, then it was a matter of making it all happen.  Every year is something brand new.”

Across town, another home is showing the Halloween spirit by going with a pirate theme this year.  Jack and Pat Crick have incorporated a coffin, a jail cell, and even gallows in their creation.

The Nokomis Learning Center preserves Great Lakes Indigenous history

The Nokomis Learning Center (5153 Marsh Road) is a Native American nonprofit organization in Meridian Township. It aims to educate people about Native American history and offer resources to Natives. The museum’s educational coordinator Victoria Voges has many roles at the Nokoimis Learning Center. She is the main presenter, curator of the gallery and runs the gift shop. “We are holding up the Great Lakes Indigenous history and the art and culture both past and present day of the contemporary times,” said Voges.

How Old Town stays afloat

You will always find some type of event happening in Old Town. Why? The neighborhood doesn’t receive any money from the state so these events help raise funds to pay for everything from trash removal to hanging baskets. “We don’t actually get any funding from the state,” Old Town Commercial Association board president Jamie Schriner said. “The largest way that we raise funding is through putting on events.”

Schriner said these festivals include the Old Town Oktoberfest, ScrapFest, and the Chocolate Walk.

Williamston Red Cedar Garden Club is hard at work, even with end of summer

 

 

WILLIAMSTON – Although the summer may be coming to a close, this doesn’t mean the Williamston Red Cedar Garden Club is calling it quits for the chilly months ahead. The club purchases, plants and maintains six gardens owned by the city. These include the gazebo, butterfly garden, Blue Star Memorial, the area around the McCormick Park restrooms and two planters in downtown Williamston. They also maintain the Williamston Depot Museum and the Williamston U.S. Post Office. Williamston Mayor Tammy Gilroy said, “They have been very integral with keeping our community very colorful.”

In the cooler months, the 47-member club finds plenty of ways to stay busy when they can’t be outdoors beautifying the city.