One write-in candidate for Grand Ledge City Council position

There is only one write-in candidate for Precinct 2 on Grand Ledge City Council. Michael Doty is the only person who filed for the position, City Clerk Gregory Newman said. Doty serves on the Parks and Recreation Commission, according to the City of Grand Ledge website. All it takes is one person to write Doty’s name on the ballot for him to be elected, Newman said. However, people walking in to vote have to know about Doty beforehand, because city employees cannot say anything about write-in candidates.

Proposed Grand Ledge City Charter closer to implementation

The City of Grand Ledge is one step closer to getting rid of its 53-year-old charter and implementing a new one. Many of the sections are old and out of date, Charter Commission Chairman Robert Doty said. The proposed commission updates those things. “It definitely needed changes after 50 some years,” Charter Commission Member Lyle Clark said. “We wanted to get the procedures straight as far as policy and things like that.”

Old Town workers talk about Election Day

Old Town residents and workers share their thoughts on important issues this Election Day. They also talk about the race between Andy Schor and Judi Brown Clarke for Lansing mayor. https://youtu.be/iQrSI_im2pI

 

Michigan roads affect Old Town

Every Michigander knows that roads in the state aren’t the best and Old Town residents have experienced that first-hand. “The roads are just not smooth in anyway shape or form,” said Jamie Schriner, Old Town Commercial Association board president. The state of Michigan has a budget of $3.5 to $4 million for capital improvements on roads or structural changes each year, said Chad Gamble, chief operating director and director of public service for the City of Lansing. Gamble said the major problem with trying to maximize road life is that the “needs of the roadway far far outweigh and exceed the amount of funding that we have for it.”

Schriner said she thinks it’s smart to pave streets with more vehicle traffic. She said they could “set aside a budget and say we’ll put three-fourths of our budget to the most highly trafficked areas first and then set a quarter of our budget aside for the less highly trafficked areas.”

Schriner said they could then let those less trafficked areas pick where work is needed in their neighborhood.