DelhiTownship

Cedar Lake Trail Head access point in the works

The Delhi Township Development Authority (DDA) is in the process of applying for a Michigan Department of Natural Resources Trust Fund (MNRTF) grant that could provide up to $300,000 toward an access point to Cedar Lake for recreation activities. The Cedar Lake Trail Head as it is called will allow for parking and access to trails as well as a launch for canoes and kayaks. A public input meeting was held on Feb. 21 where the project was discussed before the Delhi Township Board of Trustees and recommended for a public hearing on March 7. The application will be sent to the Michigan DNR.

Landscape view of the Michigan State Capitol in downtown Lansing.

Majority wants more protection from a Lansing sanctuary city proposal

The Lansing City Council voted to table a resolution that would reaffirm Lansing’s status as welcoming city to immigrants and refugees on Feb.13. The resolution was scrapped not because the council didn’t want to pass legislation, but largely due to public demand for more protection under the proposition. See below for the full proposal. The meeting drew a crowd so large that a viewing area was set up in the lobby to accommodate more people. “I’ve been on the council for a year and in that time I have never seen a crowd at a council meeting that large,” said Council Member Kathie Dunbar.

Lansing residents stood outside of the city council meeting on Monday, Feb. 27 with a banner to show support for a sanctuary city resolution. Photo by Taylor Skelton

“We are still on hold.” Sanctuary city resolution delayed in Lansing

 

The Lansing City Council continues to delay actions that would declare Lansing a sanctuary city. City Council Member Judi Brown Clarke says the council needs more time to look at the language and get legal opinion on President Donald Trump’s recent executive order. “We are still on hold,” Clarke said. While Lansing continues to hold off with a new resolution on immigration policies, earlier this month East Lansing affirmed a resolution declaring the city a safe haven for refugees. Clarke says that Lansing’s current policies are similar to East Lansing’s recent resolution.

One of the potholes on Townsend Street. Photo by Lukas Eddy

Lousy roads can cost Lansing residents more than just taxes

You’re driving to work with your eyes peeled for texting teenagers, but in the dim morning light you can’t make out a new pothole before it swallows one of your front wheels in a single, expensive blow. Similar experiences can cost other Lansing residents anywhere from $60 to over $800 for repairs ranging from front end alignments to new wheel replacements and more. Potholes can be the results of salting the roads over winter and harsh fall and spring refreezing conditions. In extremely low winter temperatures road salt loses it’s effectiveness, so the melted ice water that flows into small cracks in the pavement can freeze and expand, weakening the road structure. In the fall and spring when temperatures fluctuate around the freezing point, water flows into small spaces where it freezes and expands, damaging the road.

Neighbor John Elias recalls the fence lining Elizabeth Park clear of any entanglement from trees or brush creating a clear view of the park
Photo by Madison Job

Lansing Township working to keep parks in order

John Elias, who lives across the street from Elizabeth Park in Lansing Township, recalls his neighbor, Cheryl Basey, putting her ambitions into action. Basey had a family to worry about. Before passing away, Elias recalls her being the driving force behind creating Elizabeth Park, and arranging for the upkeep of it afterwards. “Most people in this area rent houses and have kids. Cheryl’s house was right next to this empty lot and on top of that she couldn’t see her kids when they were playing outside,” Elias said.

The west side, southeast side and east side sections of Lansing Township. Source: Hannah Holliday via: Google Maps.

Where am I? Not everyone is sure in geographically-fractured Lansing Township

Haslett resident Kate Daniels frequently makes a 15-minute trip roughly three times a month to The Eastwood Towne Center for upscale shopping and the outdoor mall atmosphere. But, not even an endless amount of hours spent at the shopping center could prepare Daniels for this geography question. When asked where the shopping mall was located, Daniels replied with, “I guess maybe it is considered to be in Lansing.”

Unbeknownst to some visitors, store employees and even residents from neighboring townships, Daniels is not alone with being confused about where Eastwood is located. Technically, the lifestyle center is located within the boundaries of Lansing Township, according to the Charter Township of Lansing’s website, and not the City of Lansing. “I have never thought about it actually,” Daniels said.