Demolition of Lansing mobile home park brings hope to surrounding residents

John Croffe stands on his porch in Lansing, looking across South Washington Avenue at the army of bulldozers and workers destroying what once stood there. “This neighborhood has waited a long time for this to happen,” Croffe says with a smile. “It was a tough thing to look at.”

What once stood there was the Life O’Riley Mobile Park, and after almost three years of being condemned and vacant, it was torn down recently. The mobile park was the subject of much controversy over the past few years, even when it was being used. According to the Ingham County Health Department’s 2014 Annual Health Report, the 14-acre area was condemned during February of that year due to unsanitary conditions, forcing over 200 people off the property.

As state regulates medical marijuana, Delhi Township weighs the options

Patricia Parter had long been against the use of medical marijuana, mainly because she never did drugs in her life. It wasn’t until an accident caused her not only pain but consumed 13 years of her life with opioid and alcohol addiction. Now recently clean, she wants to dull the lingering pain with medical marijuana. “Medical marijuana is a better alternative,” the Delhi Township/Holt resident said. “I’m trying to get that right now myself.

Littering a problem in Holt? It depends who you ask

Holt resident Joni Kosloski has a two-mile route that she often walks her dogs through near Holt Middle School. It’s also become her litter pick-up route. “I find litter very disgusting and I found myself suddenly unwilling to keep looking at it and walking past it,” Kosloski said to a community group on Facebook. “I started picking it up every day on my walk.”

Kosloski shared photos of her clean-up experiences after being away from her route of pick up litter in a couple weeks. Show in the photos are cigarette boxes, empty plastic bottles, aluminum cans, and more–and fellow members of her community chimed in once she spoke out against the trash.

New pot regulations could mean huge economic impact for Lansing Township

New laws regulating the medical marijuana industry could have the possibility to generate heavy profits for Lansing Township, should they choose to participate in a new statewide program. James Barr, founder and president of Strata Business Services in Lansing, spoke at the Lansing Township Board of Trustees meeting Tuesday to discuss the adoption of three new state laws that will help further regulate the growing, cultivation, manufacturing and distribution medical marijuana products in Michigan. While all of the potential economic benefits could do Lansing Township a lot of good, township officials are still skeptical about jumping completely on board. “It sounds like there is a loose framework of the law,” township trustee Adam DeLay said. “But now it’s in the administrative rules process for LARA and it’s trying to flush out what specifically it will look like and what loopholes will there to go around … We just have to wait and see at this point.”

DeLay, along with other members of the board said they seem interested with the concept and think that the new bills could bring in significant revenue for the township, but the idea of having a large sum of marijuana plants could bring more trouble than good.

Lansing Township to offer “Experience Lansing Township” for guests of Michigan Township Association Conference

 

For the first time in 12 years, the Capital City will be hosting the Michigan Township Association Conference & Expo. This year’s theme is “come together” which will allow the unique talent brought forth by over 1,000 other township officials to collaborate and create success in each of their communities.  

Lansing Township will provide its guests with the “experience Lansing Township” tour through Eastwood Towne Center, said Lansing Township Supervisor Diontrae Hayes. The conference will bring networking opportunities for unity amongst officials all working towards a common goal. According to Julie Pingston, who is the senior vice president and chief operating officer for the Greater Lansing Convention & Visitors Bureau, the host hotels will be including a shuttle service from the conference to the hotels.

Safety issues, property value concerns prompt township to tear down a Stoner Street home

Homeowners on the township’s west side have one less problem to worry about. The Lansing Township Board of Trustees decided on March 7 that a rental property at 507 Stoner St. had to be demolished. According to the Ingham County Treasurer’s Office, the 956-square-foot home was built in the 1930s and had been in delinquency since the summer of 2015. “Buildings in our township are usually torn down because they pose as a safety hazard,” Lansing Township supervisor Diontrae Hayes said.

Lansing Township “not the smallest but not the biggest”

According to 2015 Census data, Lansing Township has a total of 8,145 people. The township is made up of both urban and suburban islands of about 4.93 square miles of land. Amongst the 1,242 other townships in Michigan, Supervisor Diontrae Hayes of Lansing Township said “it’s not the smallest but not the biggest.” Still, it’s getting bigger in some ways. “Lansing Township is unique with its new construction and new businesses,” Hayes said.