Bill Schuette is pushes for OKAY2SAY to remain in Michigan Schools

Bullying and Suicide is has become a major problem in schools across the country. Over four thousand kids commit suicide every year and unfortunately Detroit teen Billy Watts Jr. is one of them. “I got a call at work about him and they just said he was missing at first, so i decided to go on his Instagram page,” said friend of Billy Jazlyn Dixon. 

It was on Instagram where Billy posted pictures giving clues that he wanted to take his own life. Friends of Billy describe him as being a deep thinker and for Jazln Dixon she says his suicide could have been prevented if someone would have just listened to him. “It’s something that could have been prevented if we would have took what he said more seriously.”

Children playing after school at Delhi Manor housing complex.
Photo Taken by:Denise Patterson

Scofflaws dumping trash in Delhi Manor

Sarah Pete has lived in the Delhi Manor community with her family for over two years and says that about every day people will come by and throw their trash on the curbs and keep going without thinking about what they have done. “Most of the trash cans stay full because there are lots of people in one household so sometimes their trash may pile over on the ground because it cannot fit into the trash cans.I think that when outsiders come to the neighborhood they think that the trash looks that way it does because we do not care so they just add to it,” said Pete. Jeff McKinney, Delhi Manor leasing office manager, says that this has been an ongoing issue and that he and his staff have taken action to prevent people from throwing their trash on their ground but people just do not care now days. “About a month back, my staff and I posted flyers in the neighborhood about making sure that trash goes into the trash cans and we did not have an issue for some time then all of a sudden it started again,” said McKinney. Roger Jackson, a Delhi Manor staffer, says that the trash does not come from those in the community.

Lansing Township. Screenshot courtesy of Google Maps.

Lansing Township avoiding further annexation of its land

When you are standing on the steps of the Michigan State Capitol located in Lansing, you might also be standing on a piece of land that used to belong to Lansing Charter Township 170 years ago, according to the Michigan State Capitol Directory. “What is traditionally known as Lansing now was Lansing Township,” Lansing Township Supervisor Dion’trae Hayes said. “If you go back and you look at your history where the capital building was located, Lansing Township had a huge mass of land that over the years has been annexed by the City of Lansing and has been annexed by the City of East Lansing.”

What remains of the township after years of annexation is five contiguous locations, according to the township’s website. The largest section of the township being on the west side of the Greater Lansing area, one section on the southeast side of the region and three on the east side, according to the Charter Township of Lansing’s zoning maps. In order to avoid future annexation, the township has taken the necessary precautions.

Lansing residents stood outside of the city council meeting on Monday, Feb. 27 with a banner to show support for a sanctuary city resolution.

After months of dispute, Lansing is declared a sanctuary city

It is official; the Lansing City Council has unanimously voted and declared Lansing a sanctuary city. Prior to the meeting on April 3 where the vote took place, Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero released an executive order that clarified policies in place for city officials and law enforcement to more effectively protect immigrant and refugees in the community. In Bernero’s executive order, he stated the following:

“We are confident these new policies do not violate federal law, but we are also prepared to take legal action to protect the prerogatives and powers of local government and local law enforcement,” Bernero said. “We do not want our local police to become de facto immigration agents— especially under the divisive and draconian direction of the Trump administration.”

The council agreed. “I think is one time that the city of Lansing has got it right; we are aligned and I think this addressed all the things we are getting in our emails, within our phone calls, within our conversations,” Council Member Judi Brown Clarke said at the meeting Monday.

Lansing's Life O'Riley Mobile Home Park was torn down last week, much to the delight of those who live around the area.

Demolition of Lansing mobile home park brings hope to surrounding residents

John Croffe stands on his porch in Lansing, looking across South Washington Avenue at the army of bulldozers and workers destroying what once stood there. “This neighborhood has waited a long time for this to happen,” Croffe says with a smile. “It was a tough thing to look at.”

What once stood there was the Life O’Riley Mobile Park, and after almost three years of being condemned and vacant, it was torn down recently. The mobile park was the subject of much controversy over the past few years, even when it was being used. According to the Ingham County Health Department’s 2014 Annual Health Report, the 14-acre area was condemned during February of that year due to unsanitary conditions, forcing over 200 people off the property.

Pure Options, listed as a Cannabis Clinic, is located in Lansing

As state regulates medical marijuana, Delhi Township weighs the options

Patricia Parter had long been against the use of medical marijuana, mainly because she never did drugs in her life. It wasn’t until an accident caused her not only pain but consumed 13 years of her life with opioid and alcohol addiction. Now recently clean, she wants to dull the lingering pain with medical marijuana. “Medical marijuana is a better alternative,” the Delhi Township/Holt resident said. “I’m trying to get that right now myself.

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Littering a problem in Holt? It depends who you ask

Holt resident Joni Kosloski has a two-mile route that she often walks her dogs through near Holt Middle School. It’s also become her litter pick-up route. “I find litter very disgusting and I found myself suddenly unwilling to keep looking at it and walking past it,” Kosloski said to a community group on Facebook. “I started picking it up every day on my walk.”

Kosloski shared photos of her clean-up experiences after being away from her route of pick up litter in a couple weeks. Show in the photos are cigarette boxes, empty plastic bottles, aluminum cans, and more–and fellow members of her community chimed in once she spoke out against the trash.

The conference will take place from April 10 through  April 13 and be held at the Lansing Center. 
Photo by Madison Job

Lansing Township to offer “Experience Lansing Township” for guests of Michigan Township Association Conference

 

For the first time in 12 years, the Capital City will be hosting the Michigan Township Association Conference & Expo. This year’s theme is “come together” which will allow the unique talent brought forth by over 1,000 other township officials to collaborate and create success in each of their communities.  

Lansing Township will provide its guests with the “experience Lansing Township” tour through Eastwood Towne Center, said Lansing Township Supervisor Diontrae Hayes. The conference will bring networking opportunities for unity amongst officials all working towards a common goal. According to Julie Pingston, who is the senior vice president and chief operating officer for the Greater Lansing Convention & Visitors Bureau, the host hotels will be including a shuttle service from the conference to the hotels.