Image of Spartan Stadium in East Lansing. Photo taken by Andy Chmura

Lansing falls behind rest of the nation in higher education

You know how the saying goes. A high school diploma is useless in today’s society. More and more quality jobs are requiring bachelor’s degrees. Unfortunately, this does not sit well in the city of Lansing. According to Census data, Lansing’s high school graduation rate is consistent with the rest of the nation.

Buses line the side parking lot of the Holt North High school campus on Feb. 10, 2017. The buses have to pick up the students at the North Campus before the students at the Main campus because of the slight schedule difference.

After unveiling of new high school, increase in Holt students but test scores remain near state average

Delhi Township Supervisor John Hayhoe leaned back in his chair at Tim Horton’s gazing out the window listing off the positives of Delhi Township and Holt when he came to a mid-thought remembrance. “The one thing we do have that’s a nice draw is Holt Schools,” Hayhoe said. “People actually move in to Holt so their kids can go to the local schools.”

Holt High School stands alone in what appears to be an old field. It’s a sprawling structure of brown brick and slanted roofs, reminiscent of multiple supermarkets placed next to each other. After what Hayhoe labeled as a “tough bill to pass” the bonds were sold through a millage and construction began in 2000 and concluded for the start of the 2003 school year.

Feb. 13, Haslett High School on a cloudy Monday afternoon.

Student unions celebrate Black History Month

On Tuesday Feb. 7, the Meridian Township board passed a resolution in support of Black History Month. As a district, Meridian Township is very diverse and is proud of the black heritage in its community. “Our district is also frequently looking for ways to further educate students on the importance of acceptance,” said Brixie. Brixie, is the treasurer of Meridian Township.

okemos-bullying

Divisions in presidential election spills over into school hallways

An Okemos freshman bullied by a group of boys — in the heat of a divisive national election year. Okemos Superintendent Doctor Catherine Ash says the district followed its normal bullying procedures, which encourage students to have “civil discourse” when discussing politics. But the national conversation about the election may not have done young minds any favors — and may encourage this type of behavior.