Asian Culture Club unites Okemos High, community

 

The ACC is the Asian Culture Club at Okemos High School. The organization brings all races together and volunteered in the Chinese New Year celebration at Meridian Mall. Although the organization’s members are just high schoolers, they bring positive energy to their high school and to the community by welcoming everyone together for equality, and learning about one another. Gaelin Zhao is the president of the Asian Culture Club and is currently a junior at Okemos High School. Since joining ACC his freshman year, he’s enjoying being a part of the organization.

East Lansing High School continues 50-year-old tradition of floor hockey

The high school band battled giant speakers that were blasting music. The gym was full of students and parents watching in anticipation, cheering for their favorite teams. It was the championship game of the 50th floor hockey season at East Lansing High School. ELHS finished its annual, six-week floor hockey season March 26. Tom Cleary said that floor hockey is a long-standing tradition that has lasted more than 50 years. He has been involved in the annual event for the last 30 years.

Nassar survivor works to bring counseling resources to MSU students

While the MSU community works to heal from sexual assaults by Larry Nassar, students and faculty alike are looking for a person to bring about change, hope, and a new way of life for the university. MSU sophomore and Nassar survivor Kat Ebert, said she hopes to do exactly that. “Yes, it was horrible. “But, I feel like it has helped me find my calling. I want to help other people, and I’ll do whatever it takes.”
— Kat Ebert
Ebert said counseling resources on campus are very limited, especially now that demand has become so high.

Students hold protest at trustee meeting

On a morning where members of the MSU community they thought they would be a part of a conversation, they ended up in a crowd outside. Inside the Hannah Administration building, the Board of Trustees were making decisions that didn’t sit well with many. 

East Lansing residents, students work together to ensure best living environment

It’s no secret that families who share neighborhoods with students from a major university face unique circumstances. In the city of East Lansing, permanent residents often find themselves living in close proximity with students who live lifestyles completely different from their own. Naturally, some frustration among permanent residents regarding the more raucous lifestyle of college students is to be expected. “If the partying didn’t go on as much as it does along M.A.C. (Avenue) I’m sure people would be very happy,” said Jim Levande, an East Lansing native. “After a big game weekend if you walk along M.A.C. you’re gonna find all kinds of empty beverage containers,” Levande said.

MSU staff warily watching university’s handling of Nassar crimes

In the wake of Larry Nassar’s sex abuse scandal at Michigan State University, staff members, professors, and students alike are feeling the stress of a university whose future seems uncertain.  

Following two major protests on campus, a state and federal investigation, and a vote of no confidence in the Board of Trustees from MSU faculty during a recent televised emergency meeting, attitudes on campus toward the university can be complicated. One professor, Dave Sheridan, feels let down. “I certainly feel troubled, I feel that MSU as an organization failed and we clearly need to do better. And so we need to all work together to makes sure we will all do better in the future,” Sheridan said.

Did MSU’s Nassar scandal tarnish East Lansing’s reputation?

As Michigan State University continues to confront the effects of the Larry Nassar scandal, the surrounding community weighs in on whether the fallout could damage East Lansing’s reputation. Michigan State University is experiencing faculty resignations, disciplinary action, and ongoing investigation in the wake of its association with a sexual abuse scandal involving over 250 victim reports nationally. For East Lansing, the home city of MSU, collateral damage is still being assessed. “Obviously, people are thinking about the issue,” said Kathy Schaefer, a partner with Communications and Research, Inc., a public relations firm in East Lansing. “It’s in their minds.