Dr. Patricia Edwards is a professor of education at Michigan State University. She accepted her role as a teacher at a young age, and now teaches college students at various points throughout their education.

MSU professor of education shares advice, experience

Dr. Patricia Edwards is a professor of education at Michigan State University. She accepted her role as a teacher at a young age, and, now, teaches college students who go on to teach. In October, I was given the opportunity to speak with Edwards to discuss her experience as a professor and the future of educators. Read Dr. Edwards’ thoughts on teachers choosing school districts here. CB: How did you choose your career?

Nearly two decades after a published study showed teachers factor in proximity to their hometown, job availability and district financial resources before choosing a school district, the results hold true, according to a handful of teachers in Michigan, Oklahoma and Virginia.

Why teachers choose and stay at their school district

Nearly two decades after a published study showed teachers factor in proximity to their hometown, job availability and district financial resources before choosing a school district, the results hold true, according to a handful of teachers in Michigan, Oklahoma and Virginia. In the early 2000s, Harvard Professor Susan Moore Johnson and Doctoral Student Sarah E. Birkeland set out to discover why teachers choose certain districts to begin their careers. After following 50 teachers for four years, Johnson and Birkeland found several factors were important, including basic support and respect from administration, opportunities to work with other professionals, the ability to improve skills and general school culture. These findings from Massachusetts underscore trends still present today. Returning home

For Katie Alsup, a seventh-grade geography teacher at Belle Isle Enterprise Middle School in the Oklahoma City Public School District, choosing a school was as simple as going home.

What Will the Senate Tax Bill Do to Graduate Students?

In a series of shocking twists and turns, Senate Republicans were able to pass their tax bill, their first legislative victory of the year. The Senate Tax bill calls for a mass overhaul of the American tax code. Everything from tax brackets, health care to graduate student loan rates were touched upon.

Watch Focal Point: Coping with anxiety, recap of the Black Power Rally and more

Our reporters tackle how students who suffer with anxiety overcome the issues that come with it. We have a recap of the recent Lansing election and a preview of the upcoming firearms season. MSU held its 45th annual Black Power Rally. How is different this year? The Spartan Marching band has a special global performance planned for Saturday’s football game halftime show.

Do college degrees guarantee a successful career?

Deciding where to go to college is a tough decision for high school seniors to make. It can be stressful given the fact that it is a new environment, new people, new living space, etc., but what about making the decision on whether or not to go to college and get a degree? Instead of going off to college after high school graduation, some students decide that college may not be for them and opt out of the decision to attend completely. Other students may decide to try it out for a year or two and realize that college is not for them. In a world that stresses the importance of getting a college degree in order to find a successful career, how do others without a degree find the same success?

Known your currency when studying or traveling abroad

The experience of studying abroad has many benefits for students. According to a survey done by the Institute for International Education of Students, 97 percent of students who were surveyed admitted that studying abroad helped increase maturity and 95 percent said it had a lasting impact on their worldview. Before any student should jump into traveling abroad there are some things you need to prepare for. One of the many things is knowing your locations and keeping track of your money, especially when having to change currency. “Many colleges and universities in the U.S. make it so that students do not have to worry about money on a daily basis during their undergraduate career,” says Jarlath McGuckin, an enrollment manager for Council on International Educational Exchange.

Student gets business started while still in college

It is 9:30 a.m. at Michigan State University, MSU junior entrepreneurship and innovation student Alexander Marx begins another unpredictable day of production for his co-founded company Land Grant Goods. The student-run company began as a club in 2014 until Marx took it under his wing in January 2017 as a student company affiliated in partnership with MSU. As Marx begins his day which includes the inventory of the day’s products — tea bags ready for sale — he journeys to the student organic farm where he finds his small team already hard at work, blending lemon grass, packaging products and finishing off tea products with the Land Grant stamp of approval. Marx’s company’s goal is to create quality products for East Lansing consumers in hopes of one day earning enough funds to invest profits for the company back into environmental initiatives at MSU, which includes partnerships with the Bailey Greenhouse and Urban Farm, Residential Initiative on the Study of the Environment and MSU Culinary Services. But for now, the small company makes enough to cover labor and general business cost.

Q & A: I’m a recent graduate. To spend or to invest?

The transition from college to the working world has always been seen as a huge step. It’s no more fully depending on your parents, but rather living on your own. Many grads wonder what’s next, to get a job, go back to school, or travel. But while students are trying to figure out what’s their next move, they are stuck owing for their education. In 2016 grads averaged just about $38,000 (in college debt) which has increased from previous years.

Is free college tuition in New York State a good idea?

BUFFALO, N.Y. — For many families around the country, college tuition can be a deciding factor when choosing a college. Tuition, room and board, travel costs and other expenses can add up when going to college, especially out-of-state. Has New York State finally found the solution to the burden that is college tuition? In April 2017, New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo passed a law that made college tuition free for certain students attending public universities. The program, named the Excelsior Scholarship, does not cover room and board or other fees and only applies to public universities, such as CUNY or SUNY.