Williamston Commmunity Schools is a leading school district in STEAM education and using technology in the classroom

While strolling the halls of Williamston Explorer Elementary in Williamston, students’ artwork lines the walls, backpacks and coats litter the floor and muffled discussion about this or that can be heard outside nearly every classroom. Unlike other elementary schools however, Williamston Explorer Elementary is in the works of producing the next crop of engineers, researchers, scientists and the like. After receiving three grants this past year, including $130,000 from Dart Container Company in Mason, Williamston Community Schools has invested the money into the K-12 district STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) initiative it launched this year. The initiative will take place in a series of phases. “This year was phase one, which was the creation of a K-5 STEAM lab for both of our elementary schools,” said superintendent Dr. Adam Spina. 

STEAM teacher Sean Ferguson teaches 31 STEAM classes every week, with students ranging from young 5s to fifth grade.

Williamston residents consider food waste

The produce aisle is unlike any other part of a grocery store. Vibrant produce sticking out at every turn while sprinklers shower fruits and vegetables with water to keep them hydrated. All of this time and effort is used to sell food, but some of that hard work will be for nothing. But this subject is a lot more complex than meets the eye. It has many different parts that negatively impact our society.

Supplement use in young athletes is not a big concern for local schools

Okemos and Haslett High School football players put a lot of work in the off-season to try to be stronger than their opponents. There are many ways to achieve that goal: summer camps, good dieting, weight lifting and taking supplements. However, there are many supplements in the industry, promising many different results. “I stay away from fast foods, tend to eat balanced meals and eat enough food throughout the day,” Okemos High School senior football player Domonique Clerkley said. “Throughout the day I eat Gatorade bars and fruit.

Federal lawsuit looks for ‘adjunctive relief,’ transgender school policies still important debate in Williamston

After months of deliberation and a slew of meetings trademarked with passionate arguments, the Williamston Community Schools Board of Education passed a pair of policies in November 2017 in relation to transgender youth and their definition, among other guidelines. And despite passing months ago, the debate surrounding the policies have yet to go away. Currently, there’s a pending federal lawsuit that names six of seven Williamston Board of Education members as defendants: Greg Talberg, Christopher Lewis, Sarah Belanger, Nancy Deal, Kathy Hayes and Joel Gerring. The seventh member of the board at the time, Jeffrey West, was the lone vote against the policies, which the school board passed 6-1. He is not named in the lawsuit.

Sexton wrestling rebuilds from the ground up

Chris Henderson is in his 20th year as head coach of the wrestling team and third year as Sexton’s athletic director. Henderson was a part of Sexton’s golden days winning three individual championships as a student in 1987-1989. He has been trying to get his team to the winning ways they once had ever since assuming the coaching role.

Declining enrollment compounded by school of choice play a big role in the declining participation of the program, Henderson said. A smaller school and community leads to a smaller student population which means fewer opportunities and less money. He said that kids also transfer to the bigger and better facilities and resources at other schools.