Williamston elementary schools implement STEAM into the curriculum

 

Principal Pat VanRemmen never could have imagined how positive the effect of adding STEAM to the curriculum would be at Discovery Elementary. The new elective, focused on bringing Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math together, has been a hit with both the parents and students. “I had one parent commenting about how their daughter is coming home with ideas for inventions,” VanRemmen said. The program was implemented in Discovery (young 5s through second grade) and Explorer (third through fifth grade) Elementary Schools in the fall. STEAM is an additional elective all students must take.

The Williamston 2017 Homecoming Parade advances community involvement

WILLIAMSTON- From student groups and athletes, to community members and ministries, this year’s Williamston Homecoming parade had something for everyone.The parade took place Oct. 6 before Williamston High School competed against the Fowlerville Gladiators at their home field. The parade route began at St. Mary’s Church on North Cedar Street at 6 p.m. and finished at the gates of the Larkin-Nortman Memorial Field right before the game began. The parade featured many important teams and organizations within the community.

Williamston hosts its annual Williamston History Day Tours

Williamston held its annual Williamston History Day Tours on Oct. 7. There were five sites on the free tour: The Williamston Depot Museum, Branch School, Summit, Mount Calvary and Foote cemeteries. The museum’s vice president and Williamston High School history teacher, Mitch Lutzke, has helped coordinate the event the past seven years. “Community members really like it,” said Lutzke.

The Williamston Sun Theatre renews traditions, focuses on digitalization

WILLIAMSTON- The Williamston Sun Theatre renews its traditions of the past while focusing on a future of digitalization and continued community involvement through the efforts of Owner Dan Robitaille. According to Robitaille, with big box office declines in mainstream theatres, the Sun Theatre has found new ways to appeal to the local demographic and keep their audiences beyond on the Williamston community. “There were originally 250 of these single-screen theatres in lower Michigan,” owner Dan Robitaille said. “Now we are down to about a dozen.”

With the support of their past fan base, the Sun Theatre was able to move forward through new ideas and relationships in the community. “One popular thing is our dinner and a flick with restaurants.

Elizabeth Williams School of Dance prepares for “The Nutcracker”

 

It may only be October but Elizabeth Williams School of Dance has been working on their December ballet performance of “The Nutcracker” since late August. For the past 25 years, Elizabeth Williams School of Dance located in Williamston, has been educating and instructing on the art of ballet. Five years ago, the school became a nonprofit ballet company.  

“We had a ballet school, then we decided to create a nonprofit company so we can perform and be eligible for grants,” said owner and artistic director Elizabeth Williams, also known as Miss Liz. The dance school puts on recitals every June but the company does classical performances throughout the year.

Old Nation Brewery has found its home in Williamston

 

Williamston may not be one of the biggest cities in the greater Lansing area, but to Old Nation Brewery owner Travis Fritts, it has an authentic close-knit community feel. It’s usually the smaller cities that have the more intriguing destinations, and for Williamston, its Old Nation Brewery that fits that mold. Travis Fritts and Rick Ghersi started working together in 2003 when they opened Detroit Beer Company in downtown Detroit. At the time, Fritts had a background in production, so he and Ghersi decided to get into a little bit of production with Fritts, where they focused directly on producing different beers, making them and selling it in small batches on the open market. “The pub did really well, so we decided to move into production and buy a building and some equipment,” Fritts said.

Sand wasps at McCormick Park Playground can’t be chemically treated

The weather outside has been quite a delight for Michiganders for the beginning of fall this year with slightly warmer than average temperatures according to The Weather Channel, but with great weather brings insects. The stinging kind. According to the city of Williamston’s website sand wasps at McCormick Park playground have been spotted and the area has been treated with non toxic, natural repellent, but this is nothing new for the city. Director of Public Works Scott Devries said the wasps are near the playground every year but this time it seems like more of a problem. “They’re a species of wasps that do not make a nest that have lots of wasps in them, it’s a single solitary little tunnel they make,” Devries said.

Williamston Red Cedar Garden Club is hard at work, even with end of summer

 

 

WILLIAMSTON – Although the summer may be coming to a close, this doesn’t mean the Williamston Red Cedar Garden Club is calling it quits for the chilly months ahead. The club purchases, plants and maintains six gardens owned by the city. These include the gazebo, butterfly garden, Blue Star Memorial, the area around the McCormick Park restrooms and two planters in downtown Williamston. They also maintain the Williamston Depot Museum and the Williamston U.S. Post Office. Williamston Mayor Tammy Gilroy said, “They have been very integral with keeping our community very colorful.”

In the cooler months, the 47-member club finds plenty of ways to stay busy when they can’t be outdoors beautifying the city.