Voter turnout expected to be high in November

Mid-term elections historically have lower voter turnout than presidential election years but, this November 6th is expected to be different. Polls show this upcoming election is expected to have one of the highest voter turnout from young adults in decades. Meridian Township clerk, Brett Dreyfus, says one of the reasons is the candidates they were left to vote for in the November 2016 election. “Young people felt disenfranchised,” Dreyfus said. “Whether other people agree with that or not, young people were very dissatisfied with the choices presented to them during the November 2016 election.” 

Clerk Dreyfus thinks social media also plays a part.

Army steps up recruiting in Meridian Township

Meridian Township’s local Army Medical Recruiting Station, located off Hagadorn road, is serving to help out not only the country, but the local community. Recruiters knit themselves into their local communities and can be found at high schools and community functions talking to people about the opportunities in the Army. “We go out and visit high schools like Okemos High School and the local colleges. We go to community events like fairs. Sometimes you can hear us on the local radio, and we’ve been on Fox 47,” said Mark Czarnecki, the Battalion public affairs official.

Watch Focal Point: College voters expected to be the highest, MSU is trying to reduce food waste and more

On this week’s episode of Focal Point News, college voter turnout is expected to be the highest in any midterm election. Plus, a Democratic candidate came to campus to hear the concerns of students. In campus, an MSU program is weighing how much food the nine dining halls are wasting. The homecoming parade was a success, we’ll look at how it went. In sports, we recap the loss against Northwestern and what the football team is hoping to do against Penn State.

MSU alum bringing something sweet to East Lansing

David Yuan is a man with big dreams, dreams that started when he was a boy. Growing up he was the oldest, with high expectations and responsibilities. “This was really just gods plan,” Yuan said. “The most influence that I got was from my mom, dad, Grandpop.” David was born in America, but spent ten years of his childhood from age three to fourteen in Indonesia.

Meridian Township Planning Commission examines 2018 goals

On a day where there were no public remarks, no new business to attend to, and no old business to come back and discuss, the Meridian Township Planning Commission used the time during its monthly meeting on Sept. 24 to review each of their goals for this year. “I think it’s very important, it’s something we should have tackled earlier and it’s easy to get away from that mission because throughout the rest of the year we had projects, we have somebody coming in for a special use permit or a planning unit development or what rezoning or whatever,” said Peter Menser, the principal planner at Meridian Township. “So, you get caught up in all your official business and sometimes you don’t get a chance, or you know it’s hard to hold a volunteer group here until now, its 10 p.m, just to talk about policy stuff, but on a day like this when the agenda is pretty empty it’s a perfect opportunity to start tackling stuff.”

The commission went through each of the goals it adopted on Jan. 8, 2018, spending time discussing the steps it might need to take, to accomplish its goals.

Dancy Pantz Boutique waltzes into Okemos

Megan Villasurda, 26, had a longtime dream of opening up her own dance store but realized the community already had Bottoms Up as their go-to dance supply store. “I really wanted to do this for like five years,” Villasurda said. “but I did not want to compete with them because they had all the contacts and over 40 years of business.”

When Bottoms Up closed in May, she was encouraged by her friend and boss to make her dream a reality so in August, Villasurda opened her store at 2395 Jolly Road. “I gave her a call when I heard Bottoms Up was closing and said, ‘this is your sign,’” said Kick It Out Dance Studio owner, Denise Krumm. Villasurda had been teaching at Kick It Out Dance Studio for six years.

Meridian Township helps those in need

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 12 percent of Meridian Township residents are living below the poverty level. For those who are struggling, Meridian Township has many resources and programs for families in need. One is Meridian Cares. Darla Jackson is a human services specialist for the Meridian Cares program. Jackson helps families with finding shelter, covering utilities, rent to avoid eviction and even help with medications and furniture.

Meridian Mall looks to avoid the growing list of dead malls

Think back to the days you rode with your parents and friends to the mall, excited to finally buy that cool new pair of shoes or an outfit. You were greeted with the smell of warm pretzels at the food court and the sound of cheerful kids running around in the play area and arcade. The mall was the town’s hotspot, and now they’re closing faster than ever. Meridian Mall now battles the struggle of losing stores to online shopping. Dead — or malls with a high vacancy rate — are often due to advances in technology, online shopping and delivery services.

Supplement use in young athletes is not a big concern for local schools

Okemos and Haslett High School football players put a lot of work in the off-season to try to be stronger than their opponents. There are many ways to achieve that goal: summer camps, good dieting, weight lifting and taking supplements. However, there are many supplements in the industry, promising many different results. “I stay away from fast foods, tend to eat balanced meals and eat enough food throughout the day,” Okemos High School senior football player Domonique Clerkley said. “Throughout the day I eat Gatorade bars and fruit.