New Launch Trampoline Park could affect other Meridian Mall attractions

A new near 32,000 square foot trampoline park is headed to Meridian Mall in the summer. The arrival is highly anticipated for current store managers, but the new park could affect the success of current attractions in the mall for better or worse. Meridian Mall is home to many popular stores such as JCPenney, Macy’s, Yonkers, and Dick’s Sporting Goods. Outside of the stores, however, the mall is also home to a variety of physical attractions for people of various ages. These include Sky High Bungee, Knockerball Entertainment and Extreme Fun.

Possible rezoning raises concern for residents in Okemos

After a contentious zoning meeting, no decision has been made about the possible development of land near the Sanctuary in Okemos. On Feb. 12, residents of the Sanctuary, located in Okemos, gathered at the planning commission meeting, in opposition to rezoning 7.63 acres on Hulett Road. The area is currently marked as R.R., or rural residential, and is being debated about becoming a R.A.A., or single family-low density. This would mean that the untouched lot would have the chance for a small amount of structures to be built.

Many of the residents spoke during the meeting, with the main concern being keeping the nature of the lot.

“Schools of Choice” and modern segregation

Zachary Barnes explores the roots of segregation during the early part of the 20th century in Lansing area schools, and how it compares to modern-day segregation — meaning those who have the privilege to, can transfer to another school, leaving a larger number of minority and economically disadvantaged without funding for resources. Segregation — “the separation or isolation of a race, class, or ethnic group by enforced or voluntary residence in a restricted area, by barriers to social intercourse, by separate educational facilities, or by other discriminatory means.” — Merriam Webster

Although it may not be segregation in the traditional sense, policies such as “red lining,” where minority neighborhoods were outlined in red on a city’s master plan meaning “high-risk” under rules laid out by the Federal Housing Administration. Both direct and indirect racism has lead to major inequities in the classroom. According to MSU education professors and non-profits that work to better education for minority students, these inequities have lead to resource gaps and unequal opportunity. A main reason for this, “Schools of Choice,” the process where families can choose to apply to another school district within the same region. It could be time to revisit the 1994 legislation as schools become increasingly segregated.