Life Chain brings attention to abortion

On the first Sunday of October every year, thousands of individuals throughout the U.S. support millions of babies that are aborted with an hour of prayer. This year, they were on Grand River and Hagadorn holding up signs to protest, talking about how adoption is an underused option as an alternative to abortion. Members of the moment explained that a classroom of children get aborted everyday. Many believe that this is a problem in the United States, stating that its something worth fighting for. “A whole elementary school full of children are aborted every single week in Michigan, multiply that across the whole country, I think that is something that needs to change,” Life Chain member, Ed Rivet, said.

Watch Focal Point: College voters expected to be the highest, MSU is trying to reduce food waste and more

On this week’s episode of Focal Point News, college voter turnout is expected to be the highest in any midterm election. Plus, a Democratic candidate came to campus to hear the concerns of students. In campus, an MSU program is weighing how much food the nine dining halls are wasting. The homecoming parade was a success, we’ll look at how it went. In sports, we recap the loss against Northwestern and what the football team is hoping to do against Penn State.

MSU alum bringing something sweet to East Lansing

David Yuan is a man with big dreams, dreams that started when he was a boy. Growing up he was the oldest, with high expectations and responsibilities. “This was really just gods plan,” Yuan said. “The most influence that I got was from my mom, dad, Grandpop.” David was born in America, but spent ten years of his childhood from age three to fourteen in Indonesia.

An answered prayer for the Lansing Mall

“It’s something that started out as a hobby and ended up as a business,” said owner of Lansing Athletics, Al Salas. Thirty years later and Lansing Athletics still hasn’t gone out of style. “Well, we have seen a couple of changes within the past ten years, and one of them has been online shopping,” said Salas. Salas probably prays that he can keep his store open in a mall these days. “Here in the Lansing mall, we probably have about 25 percent vacancy,” said Salas.

Watch Focal Point: Penalties that could come with tailgating, new Spartan innovations and more

On this week’s episode of Focal Point News, some things you may do while tailgating that could get you in trouble with the law. Also, a new church opened, but in an unusual location. Plus, an over 40-year-old service offered on campus is stopping for good. Homecoming is this week, we’ll take a look at some events that happened on campus and speak with the grand marshal of the parade. In sports, we recap the game against CMU and what to expect against Northwestern.

Opioid epidemic: Understanding addiction

In 2015, at the age of 16, a woman who uses the alias, Jillian Wahla, tried her first opioid. Less than one year later, Wahla found herself homeless, malnourished and addicted to the drug. “I got a few Vicodins after I had my wisdom teeth removed,” Wahla said. “It was the best my body had ever felt. I knew almost instantly I wanted to feel like that all the time.”
Wahla’s quest for opioids began as soon as her Vicodin prescription ran out. She was searching for relief regarding her undiagnosed cases of gastritis and fibromyalgia – a disorder that renders its afflicted with widespread psychosomatic body pains.

Alternative to opioids: Mail-in synthetics

As Michigan’s war on opioids rages along, legislation has passed in order to protect citizens from an unregulated alternative — imported synthetic opioids. U.S. Rep. Mike Bishop, R-Mich., is a sponsor of the recently passed Synthetic Trafficking and Opioid Prevention (STOP) Act of 2018 which aims to alleviate this once unseen problem. “We didn’t know about this before; now that we do know, we have the opportunity to stop it,” Bishop said. Bishop noted that these synthetic versions of opioids are not regulated and, in many cases, are much more potent than street drugs or even the hardest of prescribed painkillers. “The synthetic opioids out there are up to 500 times more powerful than regular doses of heroin,” said Bishop.

Alternative to opioids: Marijuana

The grips of the opioid crisis hold prevalent, and many citizens suffering from chronic pain are searching for a better option – could marijuana be the answer? For some, the thought of using one drug to replace another just doesn’t add up. Scott Greenlee, director of the Healthy and Productive Michigan initiative and former Michigan Republican Party vice chairman, spoke on his concerns with marijuana use. “Last time I checked, Michigan is still part of the United States and it [marijuana use] is against the law federally,” Greenlee said. “Just because some states have ignored that, I don’t believe Michigan should pick and choose which federal laws they’re going to start or stop following.”
For others, marijuana was a key factor in finding a path away from opioids.

When locals speak: Top-rated restaurants in Lansing and what makes them finger-licking good

Between Google reviews, Trip Advisor, Yelp and more, it’s not hard to find out what people think about restaurants in the area, but if you ever find yourself wondering what’s good to eat in the Capitol City, a word from the locals might just help. Here, we explore four Lansing-based restaurants with 4.6 stars or higher on Google reviews to find out what makes people keep coming back for more. The restaurants include Naing Myanmar Family Restaurant, Meat BBQ, El Oasis, and Soup Spoon Cafe. See the images below to find out more about the restaurants and read what restaurant-goers had to say about them.