National Night Out events in Lansing area aimed at improving police-community relations

By Zachary Mitchell
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

From Aug. 2-9, the Lansing area hosted various events associated National Night Out. This event is created to help form positivity, trust, and friendships within Lansing’s communities. According to Robert Chartnard, the executive organizer, overall the event was outstanding and well-appreciated for bringing the community together and focusing on positive actions instead of focusing on the negativity that is going on in the world today. “This event is done once a year at the beginning of August and it also corresponds with our summer reading program for the youth in the summer.

Restrictions and observers hem in Lansing’s convicted sex offenders

By Jasmine Seales
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

In The Greater Lansing area as of now, there are about 929 registered sex offenders, according to the Lansing State Journal. Of those 929, 71 percent are Tier 3 offenders, meaning that they have committed the highest amount of crime that they could commit. There are a multitude of bans and rules that sex offenders in Michigan must comply to, including being banned from working, loitering and living with 1,000 feet of elementary and high schools. Often times, due to pressure from the public, sex offenders are badgered by other citizens, especially parents to either be fired, or not be hired or picked for jobs, organizations, and other things of that nature. According to Lansing parent Maggie Hauser, she looks at sex offender websites to keep track of the sex offenders in her area.

Once shunned as a “breastaurant,” Hooters now just another place to eat in Lansing

By Alana Easterling
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

Hooters restaurant, once frowned upon by some, isn’t the shock it used to be. Since opening in the spring of 1983, Hooters has caused quite a controversy. Known for its fried chicken wings, and most importantly its glamorized waitresses dressed in skimpy uniforms, Hooters came to Lansing back in 2001. When it first arrived to the Lansing area, its desired location was in Frandor Shopping Center, but that was opposed by some local residents. “The people wouldn’t sign the ordinance to get the restaurant in the Frandor area,” said Katie Mullberry.

Although right next door, MSU not always noticed by Lansing

By Jack Ritchey
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

It seems high school students, even in the biggest college communities in the state like Greater Lansing, might not even notice they live alongside college towns. Holly Carmody, a lifelong resident of Lansing and recent political science Michigan State University graduate, says the hustle and bustle of the fall semester beginning at MSU in East Lansing is somewhat lost on Lansing youth. “In high school at least, I just know everyone’s focused on their own lives in the fall to really notice what’s going on at MSU,” said Carmody, 23. “I mean I don’t have any older siblings so I wasn’t really concerned with any of that; maybe if I did it would have been different, but yeah.” She says even growing up in Lansing, she didn’t really pay attention to MSU happenings until she was a Spartan herself.

Local business hosts sidewalk sale

By Zachary Mitchell
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

On July 30, Delphi Glass Co. had a sidewalk sale in order to attract more customers. According to Delphi staff, the sale is a major key to attracting business. “That’s their biggest day through business. They probably make on average five to six times what they would make on a usual day and we also get rid of a lot of stock that we had that was damaged,” said Dane Porter.

Despite efforts, over 5,000 people still homeless in Lansing area

By Jasmine Seales
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

According to a report done by the Greater Lansing Homeless Resolution Network, over 5,000 people in Ingham County were homeless as of 2014. Though Bob Johnson from the Lansing City Development Office says that there are a variety of options including federal funds and many government programs to ensure that Lansing residents have an affordable place to live, many people are still on the streets. “The Greater Lansing Housing Coalition helps people purchase their own home, and we have the Lansing Housing Commission that provides rental facilities to families, so I really think that as a city we are doing our job to keep housing affordable and accessible to everyone,” said Johnson. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Lansing residents on average pay less in monthly rent than people do nationwide, with the Lansing median gross rent being $743, and the national average being $920. Lansing residents also pay less on average than the rest of the state, with the Michigan median gross rent being $780.

As political conventions take place, some local residents shrug

By Jack Ritchey
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

Some Lansing area voters aren’t sure the recent Republican and Democratic National Conventions matter much to people here. Ryan Bock, a history senior at Michigan State University, says he doesn’t think the conventions have a big effect unless they’re a complete disaster. “I think the main purpose of the conventions is the ceremony and the opportunity to have rising stars in the party speak and to get the base behind the election,” Bock, 21, said. “The goal is basically the same for both parties: get some good coverage, a couple nice speeches and get the voters watching fire up about whoever the nominee is.” The Republican National Convention was held at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio, from July 18 to 21, with its Democratic counterpart taking place in Philadelphia from July 25 to 28.

Historic homes are all over Lansing, but some may be at risk

By Jasmine Seales
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

Some of the many places that tourists frequently visit in Lansing are the multitude of historical houses and establishments in the Greater Lansing area. There are a number of churches, homes and buildings that are listed as historic sites, especially in the downtown Lansing area. The Historical Society of Greater Lansing President Bill Castanier has led a free walking tour on North Washington Avenue on July 14, in order to give a more in-depth look at the houses, tell who lived in them, when they were built, and who built them. Residents were not previously allowed access into the homes, but according to the Historical Society, many people had questions about the houses and structures. A correspondent from the Historical Society of Greater Lansing said that for the most part, the houses are holding up nicely, but the tour gives a new life to the houses, and allows outsiders to get the scoop on the houses, and putting a story to the houses they see on a regular basis.

Fundraisers hope a Promise will loosen purse strings of donors

By Jack Ritchey
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

The Lansing Promise Scholarship, created by legislation passed in 2009 that made 10 “promise zones” in Michigan, helps provide higher educational opportunities to deserving high school graduates or those who recently completed their GED. The scholarship is a big selling point for MSU Greenline, Michigan State University’s student call center, which asks Spartan alumni to give back to MSU. Jake Evasic, a physics senior at MSU and supervisor at Greenline, says scholarships like the Lansing Promise help callers pull at the heartstrings of alumni and help generate the pathos needed to get them to give back. “I know for sure we call about the Promise Scholarship,” Evasic, 22, said, “it’s something I liked to talk about a lot when I was a caller because you can start getting the alumni to sympathize with what it would be like to not come to MSU.” The scholarship can provide up to an associate’s degree at Lansing Community College or up to $5,000 tuition at MSU.

Amid national debate on police use of deadly force, Lansing offers mixed views

By Alana Easterling
Listen Up Lansing Staff Reporter

What’s racism got to do with it? Some Lansing residents aren’t convinced that racism is the culprit behind the occurring cases of deaths in violent police crimes, including a recent pair of incidents in Louisiana and Minnesota, respectively, where police shot and killed black men, one who was selling CDs and another during a traffic stop. “I know race is supposed to be involved. That’s what they’re saying.” said Mary Anderson, a cashier at a Lansing Speedway. She was asked if she believed racism had anything to do with the recent shootings.