Ingham could euthanize 5 more fighting dogs Friday

Five more fighting dogs may be euthanized Friday, Ingham County Controller Tim Dolehanty told the County Commission’s Democratic caucus on Tuesday. Unless the dogs, which were involved in the recent dogfighting investigation, can be placed into rehabilitation, Ingham County animal control will be forced to euthanize them, he said.

Residents, employees and business owners share their view of Lansing’s future

Every city has its stakeholders – men, women and children who want to see the community grow, businesses thrive, education improve and popularity skyrocket. The collective viewpoint of these individuals in the City of Lansing could determine the future of Michigan’s capital city. Ariniko O’Meara – Vice President of the REO Town Commercial Association

Ariniko O’Meara is no stranger to the Lansing area. She spends much of her time in REO Town, a Lansing district in the middle of an impressive comeback. “I was born and raised in Lansing until I was 22,” she said.

Some local college students steer clear of City of Lansing; why?

Do local college students spend a significant amount of time in the City of Lansing? It depends on who you ask. “I commuted to and from LCC (Lansing Community College) but never stopped and visited the City of Lansing,” said Sarah Baylis, a Michigan State University transfer student. “As an MSU student, I stay in the East Lansing area.” Baylis attended LCC for two years before transferring to MSU.

Fewer refugees are finding a new home in mid-Michigan

Since the beginning of 2017, there is a substantial decrease in the number of incoming refugees in Lansing. According to St. Vincent Catholic Charities, which is the designated refugee resettlement agency in Lansing and mid-Michigan, there were 248 refugees that arrived in Lansing during the last three months of 2016, but and there are only 83 refugees arrived STVCC in the first quarter of 2017. “We had around 776 refugees last year,” said Judi Harris, the refugee resettlement director at STVCC. “We expected the same number this year until the administration made all these changes, so now we will be lucky to get 450 this year.”

This change is not only happening in Lansing but all over the United States and it appears to follow the new presidency.

Friends of Ormond Park seek to end the construction of golf course entrance

On Monday, July 10, an Ingham County judge signed an injunction to temporarily halt construction of a new entrance to Groesbeck Golf Course in Lansing. After witnessing Ormond Park’s trees and play structures being torn down, Friends of Ormond Park rushed to seek an injunction. Lansing residents feel Groesbeck’s new entrance project should have been included in a public hearing. Kathleen Badgley, a member of Friends of Ormond Park, has lived next to Ormond Park for 39 years. Not once was the construction of the entrance mentioned to the public, according to Badgley.

JRN@MSU

Heroin epidemic continues to worsen in mid-Michigan

Heroin continues to destruct our nation’s cities across the map. According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, from 2014 to 2015, heroin overdose death rates have increased by 21 percent. Nearly 13,000 people died in 2015. Greater Lansing shows similar trends. Ingham County Health Department gathers information from a variety of sources to report its annual Opioid Surveillance.

Greater Lansing animal shelters help homeless animals find homes

In 2016, there were around 12,000 animals licensed in and around Lansing. During the same period, 7,381 animals were taken into the two biggest animal shelters in the Greater Lansing Area: 3,139 of the animals went to Ingham County Animal Shelter, and 4,242 of them went to the Capital Area Humane Society. Some of the animals were abandoned by their owners, who could not care for their pets anymore for different reasons, some of them were rescued from unsafe places, and some of them were stray and became an animal shelter’s property. “They are usually just being dropped off at the door like sometimes the leash is tied to the door knob or they’re roaming around,” said Kelsee Horrom, a former volunteer at the animal shelter. “If they’re older the dogs won’t get adopted as quickly as younger ones, sadly.

Mason ice cream and candy store remains unfazed by technology

MASON — While data shows less and less people have time to go out shopping these days, family-owned ice cream and candy shops remain flourishing with customers and life. “Until they figure out a way to have a drone deliver a handcrafted chocolate malt, I think we’re going to be all right,” joked Shawn Sodman, owner of The Daily Scoop. Sodman and his wife Kathy have been owning and operating the ice cream parlor for seven years and offer a wide variety of ice cream, milkshakes, malts, sundaes and even grilled cheese. All of the ice cream and cheese is provided courtesy of the MSU Dairy Store. “Me and my softball team try to go to the Daily Scoop after every game,” said 11-year-old Samantha Bennett.