Construction outside on the new L.O. Eye Care

A new business opening in the Marsh Road plaza

Construction on the new L.O. Eye Care, located at 5100 Marsh Rd., is going slower than expected. The new location opening on March 31, in Okemos presents other business opportunities for the surrounding businesses in the Marsh Road plaza. “We did run into an issue with a design component of the new office and after spending a couple of weeks trying to find a way to achieve the look we desired, the plan had to be altered,” said Lisa Rentz, who is ahead of the construction progress of the new L.O. Eye Care center in Okemos. “This resulted in a slight delay in our original timeline,” 

Rentz is the director of marketing for every L.O. Eye Care location in Michigan. “We have 11 other locations including two in East Lansing and one in Williamston as well,” said Rentz.

Feb. 13, Haslett High School on a cloudy Monday afternoon.

Student unions celebrate Black History Month

On Tuesday Feb. 7, the Meridian Township board passed a resolution in support of Black History Month. As a district, Meridian Township is very diverse and is proud of the black heritage in its community. “Our district is also frequently looking for ways to further educate students on the importance of acceptance,” said Brixie. Brixie, is the treasurer of Meridian Township.

MSU professor revives 100-year-old barley for Michigan craft beer

A Michigan State professor dug into the university’s agriculture archives to revive a 100-year-old barley seed called Spartan barley. Spartan barley was developed by Frank Spragg, a plant breeder at the Michigan Agricultural College, known today as Michigan State University. Originally developed as a Michigan-indigenous barley strain for Michigan brewers, many breweries in the state used this barley strain in the early 1900’s.  

But when prohibition was voted in, brewing halted. That is until Russell Freed, MSU’s doctor of crop science, decided to revive the strain. “I got in touch with the USDA germplasm curator for barley in Idaho, Aberdeen Idaho,” Freed said, “and he sent me five grams of Spartan barley.”