Following Parkland, DeWitt High School starts active shooter drill classes with police and fire departments

DeWitt High School has started a program of classes with township fire department and police department staff to help prepare students and teachers in the case of an active shooter situation, Fire Chief Dave DeKorte announced during the  DeWitt Township Board of Trustees meeting on March 12. DeKorte, who leads the instruction in the classes, said the planning process had been going on for the last couple months, but the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, helped expedite the process. “With everything going on, it just kind of made the ball roll a little faster,” said DeKorte. The program is a daily occurrence, running between 45 minutes to an hour long, where the fire and police personnel visit three different classrooms to give formal instruction on what options they have when an active shooter is present. “Basically, teaching them: if you can, you run; if you can’t, then it’s lockdown in the room, you barricade the door; you get ready to counter, where you’re going to basically throw whatever you can at them; and swarm the person if they come in the room, and then hold them down until we get there,” DeKorte said.

Bath farmers market brings community together

The Bath Farmers Market gives local vendors and farmers the opportunity to come together to promote healthy lifestyles, encourage entrepreneurship. All while supporting the local economy, according to the farmers market mission statement. 

Every week, no matter the weather or the season, the farmers market is open for the community to buy from vendors, increase the access to healthy food options, and a gathering place to build a stronger sense of community. Shoppers can find a wide variety of food options from produce from local farms, baked goods, and ready-to-go dinners. Stevie Gonzales of Alicia’s Authentic Mexican Deli and Catering has been a part of the farmers market for the past six years. He has formed a strong connection with the customers and said he believes the farmers market is more than a place to sell food.

Despite loss in partnership with non-profit organization, DeWitt Dog Park will run “status quo” between the city and township

Due to a lack of funds, the Friends of the DeWitt Dog Park will no longer have a formal role in running the dog park, but the city and township will run it business as usual. The group proposed the idea for the park, which is located off West Herbison Road, adjacent to Padgett Park. It recently ran out of funds and dissolved, said DeWitt City Administrator Dan Coss, who played a central role in the formation of the dog park on the city’s end. The original agreement to run and fund the park was a joint-partnership between the city, township and Friends group. “As of right now, we’re just going to operate and maintain the dog park status quo,” said Coss.

MDOT proposal receives mixed reviews from Bath Township

The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) presented a plan during the Bath Township Board of Trustees meeting on Feb. 20 to reconstruct the intersection on Business Loop I-69 and Marsh Road, aiming to make it safer and more efficient. The state-funded plan is to transform the current intersection into a J-turn format, with a pedestrian crossing to allow for non-motorized access through the intersection, which would restrict northbound vehicle traffic up Marsh Road short of the neighborhood past the intersection. It also has federal funding from the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program to help reduce traffic build-up and improve air quality with less idling at the stop lights. However, the plan has been met with mixed reviews from township residents and board members.

For DeWitt Township Clerk Diane Mosier, the people keep her coming back

As Diane Mosier heads into her 29th year as DeWitt Charter Township clerk, she says it’s the people that keep her coming back. “I love the community, I’ve lived here my whole life, I was born here, I never left,” said Mosier. “I love serving the people here, it’s a great community, the staff is fabulous, and it’s never dull, there’s always someway you can help someone.”

She is currently the longest serving elected official in the township. Mosier got started in civil service at the township in 1990 when she was appointed as clerk and then was elected to the position during the same year. She’s held the role ever since.