Nassar survivor Kat Ebert works to bring change to MSU

While the MSU community works to heal from sexual assaults by Larry Nassar, students and faculty alike are looking for a person to bring about change, hope and a new way of life for the university. MSU sophomore and Nassar survivor Kat Ebert, said she hopes to do exactly that. “Yes, it was horrible. “But, I feel like it has helped me find my calling. I want to help other people, and I’ll do whatever it takes.”
— Kat Ebert
Ebert said that the counseling resources on campus are very limited, especially now that demand has become so high.

We Will Not Be Ignored

On a morning where members of the MSU community they thought they would be a part of a conversation, they ended up in a crowd outside. Inside the Hannah Administration building, the Board of Trustees were making decisions that didn’t sit well with many. 

East Lansing residents, students work together to ensure best living environment

It’s no secret that families who share neighborhoods with students from a major university face unique circumstances. In the city of East Lansing, permanent residents often find themselves living in close proximity with students who live lifestyles completely different from their own. Naturally, some frustration among permanent residents regarding the more raucous lifestyle of college students is to be expected. “If the partying didn’t go on as much as it does along M.A.C. (Avenue) I’m sure people would be very happy,” said Jim Levande, an East Lansing native. “After a big game weekend if you walk along M.A.C. you’re gonna find all kinds of empty beverage containers,” Levande said.

MSU staff warily watching university’s handling of Nassar crimes

In the wake of Larry Nassar’s sex abuse scandal at Michigan State University, staff members, professors, and students alike are feeling the stress of a university whose future seems uncertain.  

Following two major protests on campus, a state and federal investigation, and a vote of no confidence in the Board of Trustees from MSU faculty during a recent televised emergency meeting, attitudes on campus toward the university can be complicated. One professor, Dave Sheridan, feels let down. “I certainly feel troubled, I feel that MSU as an organization failed and we clearly need to do better. And so we need to all work together to makes sure we will all do better in the future,” Sheridan said.

The Harding sisters, from left to right, Priscilla, Elizabeth and Caroline, all play golf. Priscilla and Caroline are members of the Michigan State women’s golf team. Elizabeth is expected to join them next year.

Harding sisters bring sibling bond to MSU golf team

Teammates aren’t always just teammates. Sometimes they’re family. What do the Harding sisters really thing about each other and golfing at MSU?Spartan Newsroom sat down with Caroline and Priscilla for extended interviews.  

The Harding sisters’ blood runs deep in the game of golf. Their father and mother were collegiate golfers — Tom played at Michigan State, while mother Joal played at Auburn.

Q&A: Golfer Priscilla Harding talks about playing at the college level with her sisters

Priscilla Harding is the second of what soon will be three sisters playing on the Michigan State women’s golf team. Older sister Caroline is a redshirt sophomore and younger sister Elizabeth is expected to join the team next season. Spartan Newsroom sat down with Caroline to talk about what it’s like to play with her family’s legacy. Spartan Newsroom: What does it mean to you to play at the same school as your dad? Priscilla Harding: Once I decided to pursue golf, my No. 1 goal was to play at Michigan State.