State grant helps university fight sexual assault

A new grant from Governor Synder will help Michigan State combat sexual assault.

The 38-thousand dollar aid will go towards the MSU Bystander Network, a group that empowers people to take action if they see signs of sexual assault.

The network is working on an educational seminar for upperclassmen that they want to implement by the Fall 2017 semester. The class will build on the sexual assault workshops mandatory for incoming freshman. “It’s taking it a step further and building on that education,” says Leah Short, MSU Bystander Network project coordinator. When it comes to recognizing assault, Sergeant Andrea Munford of the Michigan State Police Department says that it’s important to trust your gut. “A lot of times, [people] may not recognize it for what it is, but they know they have a bad feeling about it,” said Munford.

Sex Expo held by the University Activities Board

Michigan State’s University Activities Board held a Sex Expo to educate students. Caroline Poole, UAB event programmer, said that it is difficult attracting students to educational events.”We really wanted that engaging component but we also wanted it to be educational,” Alessandra Alvares-Paines, freshman, said she enjoyed the games provided by the fraternity and learned some new things. “I’ve learned phrases for things like the actual term names and I’m learning about other ways to keep safe sex,” Paines said.

Michigan State University’s newest apartment home

1855 Place, a student family and single student apartment community will open Fall 2017.

According to Kat Cooper, director of communications for hospitality services, in the family units it is a total price and in the rest of the facility it is a per person price.

Camilla Johnson, junior, feels that the pricing does not accommodate everyone.

“Its not fair, just because they have a family it should be a flat rate and students have to pay by the room,” Johnson said. “I feel like it should be some kind of adjustment there.”

MSU professor revives 100-year-old barley for Michigan craft beer

A Michigan State professor dug into the university’s agriculture archives to revive a 100-year-old barley seed called Spartan barley. Spartan barley was developed by Frank Spragg, a plant breeder at the Michigan Agricultural College, known today as Michigan State University. Originally developed as a Michigan-indigenous barley strain for Michigan brewers, many breweries in the state used this barley strain in the early 1900’s.  

But when prohibition was voted in, brewing halted. That is until Russell Freed, MSU’s doctor of crop science, decided to revive the strain. “I got in touch with the USDA germplasm curator for barley in Idaho, Aberdeen Idaho,” Freed said, “and he sent me five grams of Spartan barley.”

A white church in Hawaii

Follow us on 3 new First Amendment issues

New issues broke out today about extending religious freedom exemptions to businesses, state and local government; cutting federal funds to universities where disruptive speeches are canceled; and political activity by churches. Follow us for coverage.