DeWitt plans on bringing new infrastructure and home development to the area

DeWitt wants future citizens to move into its community, and its developing multi-use housing to make it happen.  

“The whole objective is to have the community that is here enjoy what’s here, talk to their neighbors, and feel good about their community so that they will stay,” said Loretta Spinrad, from the DeWitt Chamber of Commerce.  “That translates to more people wanting to live here.”

According to Daniel Coss, DeWitt city administrator, and township manager, Rod Taylor, a huge part of growing the township and city is providing housing for all demographics of people.  So, this means that creating all types of housing developments is crucial to success heading forward. The City of DeWitt and DeWitt Township are planning for growth in the future and planning on accommodating more citizens.

DeWitt using their budget to create a go to destination

The city of DeWitt is starting to become a cultural hub and a go-to destination. A lot of money is being put into the development of their downtown. Maricela Vargas is a preschool teacher in Lansing who is looking for a job in DeWitt and she is interested in DeWitt because of the small city feel. When Vargas visited DeWitt, she felt the family connection with the residents. Vargas said: “I was attracted to DeWitt because it’s a cute city and it’s going to be a great place to live.

Ingham county residents enjoy free zoo day  

Potter Park Zoo welcomed Ingham county tourists with free admission on Oct.7. This event happens every year on the first Saturday of October. “Doing a free day is a sort of giving back to them (residents), since they supported us,” said Sarah Pechtel, the general curator of the zoo. “Free day is also a great way to experience something positive from that,” Pechtel continued. Encompassing over 20 acres and featuring more than 500 individual animals of  160 different species, the Potter Park Zoo has three conservation efforts that support the black rhino, red panda, and Puerto Rican crested toad.

Brenke Ladder brings fishermen to Old Town

Whether it’s to head down to the river to relax and watch the water flow over the dam or to try and catch a meal, the Grand River and the Brenke Fish Ladder have become a communal place for people of all backgrounds to appreciate what nature and Old Town have to offer. “I come down to the fish ladder almost five days a week,” said Kurt Scobie, a fisherman from Everett, Michigan. “I love being by the water, it’s peaceful, calms me down and allows me to catch some dinner.”

The Brenke Fish Ladder was built in 1981 as a way to aid fish who were swimming upstream to spawn. Designed as a circle, the fish jump over barriers that slowly get taller and taller until they are safely above the dam and can continue up the river. “I fish here all the time,” said Azid Rodriguez, a Dewitt local who was fishing for catfish.

Williamston hosts its annual Williamston History Day Tours

Williamston held its annual Williamston History Day Tours on Oct. 7. There were five sites on the free tour: The Williamston Depot Museum, Branch School, Summit, Mount Calvary and Foote cemeteries. The museum’s vice president and Williamston High School history teacher, Mitch Lutzke, has helped coordinate the event the past seven years. “Community members really like it,” said Lutzke.

The Williamston Sun Theatre renews traditions, focuses on digitalization

WILLIAMSTON- The Williamston Sun Theatre renews its traditions of the past while focusing on a future of digitalization and continued community involvement through the efforts of Owner Dan Robitaille. According to Robitaille, with big box office declines in mainstream theatres, the Sun Theatre has found new ways to appeal to the local demographic and keep their audiences beyond on the Williamston community. “There were originally 250 of these single-screen theatres in lower Michigan,” owner Dan Robitaille said. “Now we are down to about a dozen.”

With the support of their past fan base, the Sun Theatre was able to move forward through new ideas and relationships in the community. “One popular thing is our dinner and a flick with restaurants.

How Old Town stays afloat

You will always find some type of event happening in Old Town. Why? The neighborhood doesn’t receive any money from the state so these events help raise funds to pay for everything from trash removal to hanging baskets. “We don’t actually get any funding from the state,” Old Town Commercial Association board president Jamie Schriner said. “The largest way that we raise funding is through putting on events.”

Schriner said these festivals include the Old Town Oktoberfest, ScrapFest, and the Chocolate Walk.

Sweetie-licious is a small-town bakery with big-time charm

A small-town bakery with big-time charm is what you will find as you enter downtown Dewitt.  From the retro décor to the award-winning pies, the feeling of love and inclusion is a common theme when entering through the front door of Sweetie-licious. “It optimizes that small town feel of being very welcoming.  You get that delicious food, but you get the feeling of comfort so when you come you feel automatically welcomed,” said Melanie Phelps, a frequent customer.  “You feel like you are walking back in time. “It’s an experience rather than just a place.  You walk in and it is the atmosphere of somewhere between nostalgic and cute,” said local customer Janee Penfield. This was the vision that restaurant owner, Linda Hundt, had envisioned when she decided to make her dream a reality and open her own bakery.  She had the vision of creating an environment where she could showcase her baking skills, yet spread kindness and love to anyone who walked through the front door. “I found out my gifts were loving people and baking,” Hundt said.

Northern Michigan golfing offers a short season but great variety

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. — Although the golf industry in Traverse City faces seasonal issues by Northern Michigan’s harsh winters, it comes back in full swing as spring swings around. Traverse City offers golf courses across the area with designs like Arnold Palmer’s, Jack Niclkaus’s, Jerry Matthews, Gary Player’s etc. The sport attracts large amounts of business which in turn impacts the city immensely. Michael DeAgostino at the Grand Traverse Resort and Spa, says they offer three distinguished 18-hole championship courses, as well as private lessons, on-course instruction, team builds, ladies-only schools, junior camps, clinics for corporate groups, memberships, and club fitting.