August 2017, CNS Budget

Aug. 16, 2017 To: CNS Editors From: Eric Freedman & Dave Poulson http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/ For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Tony Cepak at (517) 803-6841 or cepak@msu.edu. For other questions or problems, contact Eric Freedman, freedma5@msu.edu; (517) 355-4729 (office) or … Continue reading →

Driving trends shifting gears

By JACK NISSEN Capital News Service LANSING — Where are Americans driving? Researchers from the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute analyzed data from the Federal Highway Administration, and the results are in: City driving is rising, and it’s risen … Continue reading →

Q&A: financial security vs. passion

How do you strike a balance between finding financial security and following your passion? Answering related questions are Mackenzie McClellan, a student at Oakland University, is a psychology major who aspires to become a clinical psychologist; Braxton Buckner, a student at Michigan State university, majors in advertising with a media management focus’; and Katelynn Warfle, a student at Michigan State University studying arts and humanities for her undergraduate degree and plans on attending medical school to become a physician assistant. Q: Why did you choose your major/career field? McClellan: “I chose my major and career path because I think psychology is incredibly interesting, and I really love it. It could potentially result in a lot of pay, but that was not a deciding factor for me.”

Can you eat on $1,000 per year? Yes, says efficiency expert

Finding ways to save money can be difficult. Everyday people have to make decisions about where and how to spend their hard-earned dough. Back in 2014, Michael Kirk decided not only to help people save money, but time as well. After using engineering concepts, he was able to eat for $1,000 a year and decided to share with people what he had learned. He developed a company called Efficiency is Everything (EIE). Through this, he utilizes his master’s degree in engineering to give people tools and data that will allow them to become more efficient in their spending.

When clothing is shed, some see cash appear

When most people hear of a gentlemen’s club many thoughts start going through your head. What many do not know is that the United States strip club annual revenue as of September 2016 was $3.1 billion according to information provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The average earning for a “dancer” or “stripper” as well as club managers can be anywhere from $40,000 to over $100,000 based on the club’s location, customer base and the amount you are contracted to work. According to information from IBISWorld industry research report on strip clubs published in March 2017, the industry over the last five years has grown steadily, while per capita disposable income increased at an annualized rate of 1.6 percent contributing to consumers engaging in leisure activities such as visiting a gentlemen’s club. Waitresses, bartenders, DJ’s, managers and general staff help to make sales and all reap the benefits of a good nights work.