MSU students protest the results of the 2016 presidential election on campus.

Minority groups battle stereotypes in the media

A series of police shootings of African-Americans and acts of terrorism by followers of the Islamic State group thrust racial, ethnic and religious minorities into the media spotlight during the 2016 presidential campaign. And that’s led to an increase in negative stereotypes portrayed in the media, some say. “The media plays a major role in perpetuating stereotypes. Whenever a crime is committed, I start looking to see what race the person is,” said Joe Darden, a professor in Michigan State University’s Department of Geology who researches issues of racial inequality. “Whenever it’s a black person it’s mentioned, but when the media fails to mention race, I know it’s a white person.

A young Trump supporter at the Donald Trump Jr. rally, Nov. 2, at the MSU Union.

Millennial Republicans stood behind Donald Trump weeks before election

At the start of the presidential election cycle, members of the Michigan State Univeristy College Republicans got together for a meeting like they do every Tuesday night. They discussed who they would like to see as the party’s presidential nominee. That day, support fell to Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio. Of course, they didn’t get who they wanted. But in the process of getting elected the 45th president of the United States, Republican Donald Trump brought new energy into the campus group.

A protester wears a T-shirt that reads "Made in USA with Mexican parts" at the MSU Union on Nov. 2. Protesters rallied against a speech by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's son, Donald Trump Jr.

Presidential campaign sparks reaction among Latinos on campus

The protesters packed in close in the hallways of Michigan State University’s Union building. In the second floor ballroom, Donald Trump Jr. was rallying supporters of his father ahead of the Nov. 8 election. Outside the room, protesters held signs with messages of support for various minority groups and chanted phrases like “love, not hate” and “we will not be silenced.”

More than 40 years after the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision, abortion remains a hot-button political topic in the United States. According to a March 2016 survey by the Pew Research Center, 56 percent of U.S. adults think abortion should be legal in all or most cases while 41 percent say it should be illegal all or most of the time.

Abortion remains key issue 40 years after Roe v. Wade

More than 40 years after the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision, abortion remains a hot-button political topic in the United States. According to a March 2016 survey by the Pew Research Center, 56 percent of U.S. adults think abortion should be legal in all or most cases while 41 percent say it should be illegal all or most of the time. But despite attention on the topic, American’s views haven’t shifted in the 10 years Pew has surveyed on the topic.

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Women rush to birth control that will outlast Trump presidency

Planned Parenthood of Michigan says it’s seen a sharp increase after the presidential election in the number of women seeking intrauterine devices, or IUD birth control.

The possible reason: President-elect Donald Trump and the Republican-controlled Congress have set their sights on repealing the Affordable Care Act. Trump will become president on Jan. 20.

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Divisions in presidential election spills over into school hallways

An Okemos freshman bullied by a group of boys — in the heat of a divisive national election year. Okemos Superintendent Doctor Catherine Ash says the district followed its normal bullying procedures, which encourage students to have “civil discourse” when discussing politics. But the national conversation about the election may not have done young minds any favors — and may encourage this type of behavior.

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Record High of Registered Voters

East Lansing, Mich.—The 2016 presidential election turned out to be the highest volume of registered voters in the history of Michigan, causing a busy day for city officials but also an encouraging display of American pride. Many city officials were scrambling and trying to make the process smooth and easy for newly registered student voters. Marie Wicks, the City Clerk of East Lansing, described election day as “hectic and very busy”. “We had 700 student employees working around campus at the polling locations,” said Wicks. “In terms of residents hired by the city, we had 300 people working, it was doubled from last election and six training sessions as compared to two.”

Wicks was very pleased with the turnout and considered all the events that unfolded on election day to be an “experience”.