"We're now certified. Boards certified. The Electors have been elected." State Elections Director Chris Thomas answering if the 16 Trump Electors will be certified if the recount goes through.

Ingham one of few counties to complete recount

A statewide recount of Michigan’s votes in the presidential election died in the courts and was suspended or never started in most Michigan counties, but was completed in Ingham County. Overseeing operations at the Ingham County Fairgrounds in Mason, County Clerk Barb Byrum and a staff of volunteers account for almost 135,000 ballots. Byrum said, “it has been a monumental undertaking. Tables and chairs, projectors and screens being taken to the fairground, a printer this afternoon, over 300 emails for people who are interested. I currently have 50 workers and need more.”

Bryn Williams

Q&A with Bryn Williams

Spartan Newsroom spoke with Bryn Williams when working on a story about how voter registration in East Lansing had doubled from 2012 to 2016. During the discussion, he talked a lot about the struggle that he getting students registered to vote and how we can overcome them. Efforts by the East Lansing City Clerk and campus student groups helped lead to a three fold increase in new voter registrations from 2012 to 2016, according to the clerk’s office. So how did they do it? Spartan Newsroom asked Williams, former community liaison at the Associated Students of Michigan State University, MSU’s undergraduate student government.

Lines fill the stairs as students wait anxiously to cast their vote Presidential Election on Nov. 8, 2016 at the IM West Building in East Lansing, Michigan.

East Lansing voter registrations spike from 2012 to 2016

Leanne Pregizer was eligible to register to vote for the 2012 election, but chose not to because she didn’t know how to go about it. In 2016, a friend told her about Turbovote, a nonprofit website that helps people register to vote, update registration or request an absentee ballot. “The site was really easy to use, and they laid out the steps really well,” said Pregizer, Michigan State University law student . Online efforts like Turbovote, along with heavy voter registration efforts by campus groups, helped contribute to a spike in voter turnout and voter registration in East Lansing, local elections officials say. How did they do it?

political-power

The power of student votes in East Lansing

Political power of students — something Mark Grebner of Practical Political Consulting has been fighting for since he was a student at Michigan State University almost four decades ago. He started in local government, serving on the East Lansing planning commission and eventually being elected to the Ingham County Board of Commissioners. But how much power do they really have? And do students use it?

Michigan recount comes to halt, brings system to light

Michigan’s official recount of the 2016 Presidential election results, which has consumed the nation’s attention — has halted. On Dec. 5 at noon, Ingham County officially opened its state-ordered recount. Two days later, a federal judge had overturned the earlier ruling. But the county’s results had already been submitted at around 12:30 p.m. on Wednesday, according to Ingham County Clerk Barb Byrum.

screen-shot-2016-11-29-at-4-56-25-pm

Record High of Registered Voters

East Lansing, Mich.—The 2016 presidential election turned out to be the highest volume of registered voters in the history of Michigan, causing a busy day for city officials but also an encouraging display of American pride. Many city officials were scrambling and trying to make the process smooth and easy for newly registered student voters. Marie Wicks, the City Clerk of East Lansing, described election day as “hectic and very busy”. “We had 700 student employees working around campus at the polling locations,” said Wicks. “In terms of residents hired by the city, we had 300 people working, it was doubled from last election and six training sessions as compared to two.”

Wicks was very pleased with the turnout and considered all the events that unfolded on election day to be an “experience”.

Trump win grabs headlines, but Michigan also remains red in U.S. and state House

The 2016 presidential election transformed Michigan from a state with traditional Democratic voting patterns into one of president-elect Donald Trump’s biggest swing-state victories. Michigan, which hasn’t cast its electoral votes for a Republican presidential nominee since 1988, turned to Trump, as lower voter turnout across key Democratic areas in Detroit and Flint helped propel him. Trump’s victory was unexpected, as a Fox News poll gave Democrat Hillary Clinton a four-point edge the day before the election, while the New York Times gave Clinton an 85 percent chance to win on election night. Overlooked in the hubbub of Trump’s odds-defying victory was that the U.S. House of Representatives maintained its “red” majority. Michigan not only voted for Trump, but kept its nine-to-five Republican majority in the U.S. House among its 14 seats.

East Lansing precinct map

East Lansing votes deep blue; student precincts less certain

When Donald Trump was projected winner of Michigan in the 2016 presidential election, it was the first time a Republican presidential candidate won the state since 1988. Ingham County, one of just eight Michigan counties that voted for Hillary Clinton on Nov. 8, favored her with a clear majority of 60.2 percent compared to Trump’s 32.8 percent. East Lansing City Clerk Marie Wicks was expecting her city and county to support Clinton. “Nothing about our results is surprising, but I was surprised by Michigan’s results,” Wicks said.