MSU sophomore is making an impact as a mentor

The year is 2010. A young man, age 12, walks into the local liquor store on Detroit’s west side and buys 20 boxes of Mike and Ike candy. To the cashier this may look like a kid with an insatiable sweet tooth on his way to school, but to Andrei Nichols, this purchase would prove to be the root of his entrepreneurial future. “My very first business venture was in seventh grade when I started selling Mike and Ikes and Now and Laters, two for $1,” Nichols said. “I did that for a week and made $50 and said ‘I could get used to this.’ And after that I really started to like business.”

Nichols then began to ask his father, who is an entrepreneur, questions about how to start a business; the ins and outs of the business world.

Girl Scout Troop 6000 provides stability for homeless youth in NYC

NEW YORK — Ebony Daniel didn’t expect to find herself in the situation she was in. She had just become a single mother to three young girls after losing their father to an unexpected heart attack and was living in a tiny one-room bedroom in a shelter in Queens. “My kids were devastated because they thought he would have been coming home the next day, but he didn’t wake up,” Daniel said. “Being in a shelter, there is a lot of strain.”

Daniel saw that her girls – Leilani, 12, Maliyah, 7, and Melanie, 5 – needed a change. That’s when she found out about Girl Scout Troop 6000, New York City’s first troop entirely comprised of young girls living in homeless shelters.

From zero: How to build a Chinese radio station in Michigan

Jieyu started her Chinese radio station four months after she moved to Michigan from Canada in 2015. She started it all by herself and last year, she rented an office and renovated it as a radio studio. Jieyu focused on the stories that happened in the Chinese community in Michigan, and also broadcasted news from U.S. and China to make Chinese immigrants who have American citizenship more politically involved. Besides radio and TV shows, she tried to host offline non-profit events like C4H (Cook for Homeless) and Chinese Story Time. C4H is an event in which Chinese families can cook once per month and serve food for homeless people in Michigan.

“If you wanna know me, ask!” Chinese student organization deals with cultural stereotypes

On April 7, Humans of East Lansing, a Chinese student-run media platform that explores stories in the community, hosted an event titled “If you wanna know me, ask!” at the East Lansing Public Library. The purpose of this event was to break barriers and misunderstandings between community groups. The event divided people into four roundtables and invited people from various cultural backgrounds to talk to each other.  

 

 

“Just don’t be afraid to learn about other people and ask about what other people are interested in.

Asian Culture Club unites Okemos High, community

 

The ACC is the Asian Culture Club at Okemos High School. The organization brings all races together and volunteered in the Chinese New Year celebration at Meridian Mall. Although the organization’s members are just high schoolers, they bring positive energy to their high school and to the community by welcoming everyone together for equality, and learning about one another. Gaelin Zhao is the president of the Asian Culture Club and is currently a junior at Okemos High School. Since joining ACC his freshman year, he’s enjoying being a part of the organization.

Diversity, over test scores, attracts parents to Lansing schools

In the Lansing school district, 75 percent of the student body is made up of minorities, according to the 2017-2018 Racial Census Report from the Michigan Department of Education. On the outside, this diversity has allegedly been the reason for low test scores and low graduation rates. Those who look deeper, however, see the importance of immersing children in a diverse, communal environment at a young age.