New trees of all types to replace damaged ashes

By IAN K. KULLGREN

Capital News Service

LANSING — The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has awarded $90,000 to help cities regrow urban forests damaged by the emerald ash borer plague.

Twenty-one cities and environmental groups will receive between $800 and $20,000 each to replace trees and fund environmental education programs.

Groups in Wayne County received $10,000 to plant trees in Livonia and repair nature trails in Detroit.
Among the other recipients are Traverse City, Cadillac, Big Rapids, Holland and Three Rivers.
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Harbors study ways to attract big yachts

By IAN KULLGREN

Capital News Service

LANSING – A yearlong economic study funded by the federal government will help Great Lakes coastal communities capitalize on the growing recreational boating market.

The federal government awarded $471,000 to Michigan Sea Grant that includes a portion to help communities come up with ways to draw more tourists to their local harbors.

Sea Grant will choose four coastal communities around the state, including at least one on Lake St. Clair, to participate in the study over the next year.
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More trees, bushes planted to improve hunting grounds

By IAN K. KULLGREN
Capital News Service

LANSING — The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is moving forward with plans to provide incentives to private landowners and launch other initiatives to restore hunting habitats.

The programs, funded by recent increases to hunting and fishing license fees, are intended to rejuvenate land for hunting while maintaining a healthy game population.

In the Upper Peninsula and Alpena area, for example, DNR officials are working with landowners to plant trees and small brush to lure deer to popular hunting areas, part of an effort to “create world-class hunting opportunities” in the state, according to the department.
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Dozens of school districts running in the red, state says

By IAN K. KULLGREN

Capital News Service

LANSING — Nearly 50 school districts and public charter schools across the state ended last year with a deficit, according to the Department of Education, prompting action from state officials and legislators.

Although the state expects many of those districts and schools were expected to eliminate or at least reduce their deficits by the end of this fiscal year, Sept. 30, 22 are projected to slip even further into the red.

One of the financially direst situations involves Benton Harbor Area Schools, which has a 50 percent deficit — meaning the district is only taking in half the revenue it needs to cover expenses— the result of bleeding enrollment that means less per-pupil state aid.
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