Invasive species gang up on native crayfish

By NATASHA BLAKELY

Capital News Service

LANSING — Invasive species in the Great Lakes are ganging up against native species.

A new study looking into invasive zebra and quagga mussels’ relationship with invasive rusty crayfish illustrates how the harm they cause together can be greater than either of them alone.

“What we found was that these invasive crayfish are really good at exploiting the resources provided by the (invasive) mussels,” said Mael Glon, who worked on this research while pursuing a master’s degree at Central Michigan University. “I don’t just mean eating them, because they are eating them, but they’re also eating what grows from what’s filtered from the mussels.”

The study was a collaboration between Central Michigan University (CMU) and Chicago’s Shedd Aquarium. It tested how the presence of the invasive mussels affected the growth and activity of both the invasive rusty crayfish and the native virile crayfish. The study funded by Michigan Sea Grant found that the mussels’ presence led to increased growth and activity of the invasive crayfish, but not the native ones. Continue reading