Capital News Service Bonus Budget – May 5

Bonus Week, May 5, 2017

To: CNS Editors

From: Perry Parks, Eric Freedman and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact Perry Parks, perryrobertparks@gmail.com, (517) 388-8627 or Eric Freedman, freedma5@msu.edu.

THIS IS BONUS WEEK: Here is our end-of-the-semester file of stories that you may not have had space for in the past few months but remain timely.

SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS PACKAGES: Again this summer, CNS plans to move three packages – in June, July and August — of Michigan environmental stories in partnership with Great Lakes Echo.

Here is your file:

(New story) DEERDISEASE: As the Department of Natural Resources expands educational efforts about chronic wasting disease, a bipartisan bill to raise awareness and prevent spread of the disease is moving through the House. The bill would increase the fine for importing deer carcasses or parts into the state, to $500-$2,000 from the current  $50-$500. The goals are both to reduce the likelihood that chronic wasting disease will spread among Michigan deer and to raise awareness about the seriousness of the problem. The bill unanimously passed the House Committee on Natural Resources in late April. A Marquette representative is the main sponsor. We also speak with DNR officials and an Iron Mountain lawmaker. By Laina Stebbins. FOR ALL POINTS

LAWYERLAWMAKERS: Legislators work every day to make and amend laws, but how many have a background in the field? Thirteen lawmakers — of 148 in both House and Senate — have worked as lawyers, according to the Michigan State Bar. That accounts for less than 10 percent of the state Legislature. It’s a slight drop from 17 lawyer-legislators in 2013-14, and 22 a decade ago. A Shelby Township representative is one of the 13 lawyers in the current session, and he believes more lawyers should be roaming the Capitol. We talk with him, a non-lawyer lawmaker and a law professor. By Laura Bohannon. FOR ALL POINTS.

DRIVERLESSCAR: As Michigan accelerates toward leadership in emerging driverless car technology, industry experts say its workforce needs to catch up. Gov. Snyder signed legislation approving the sale and use of autonomous vehicles when they’re ready. But analysts note significant gaps in skills among workers who could be developing driverless technology. They call for big changes in education and training programs to fill looming jobs that haven’t been fully created yet. We talk with a member of the state’s autonomous vehicle task force, a robotics educator at the University of Michigan and a workforce development manager in Oakland County. By Chao Yan. FOR ALL POINTS

MICHIGANVACCINATIONPUSH: Michigan recently launched a campaign to encourage vaccinations. So far, the program has been well received by members of the medical community, although there is some dispute as to why people don’t get vaccinated in the first place. As Michigan hopes to improve its standing in immunization rates, members of the campaign, local health centers, and physician associations chime in on how to do so. By Isaac Constans. FOR ALL POINTS.

AGINGDAMS: Roads and bridges aren’t Michigan’s only infrastructure problem. Less visible – but just as hazardous if not properly maintained – are the state’s 2,600 dams. Just as deteriorating roads and bridges can cause significant damage, aging dams in high-hazard locations have the potential to do great harm to the environment and to human life. The Otsego Township Dam on the Kalamazoo River is one. Officials at DEQ and DNR say keeping up with these aging dams is a cost and logistical nightmare. By Laina Stebbins. For ALL POINTS

RELIGIOUSFREEDOM: Some religious leaders are questioning the necessity of a House bill aimed at further protecting their First Amendment rights. The bill would allow ministers, clerics and other religious practitioners to refuse to marry couples who violate their religious beliefs. We talk to the bill co-sponsor from Potterville, a youth pastor from Three Rivers, a rabbi from Kalamazoo and the executive director of a Kalamazoo LGBT resource center. By Caitlin Taylor. FOR ALL POINTS.

MIDWIFELICENSING: Midwife associations were pleased when Gov. Rick Snyder signed new midwife licensing legislation into law at the beginning of the year. The law requires midwives to apply for a license with the newly created Michigan Board of Licensed Midwifery, operating through the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs. We talk to LARA, president of Michigan Midwives Association, vice president of Friends of Michigan Midwives, president of the Michigan Affiliate of American College of Nurse-Midwives and a health policy nurse from Dorr Township. By Caitlin Taylor. FOR ALL POINTS.

PUREMICHIGAN: Long before “Pure Michigan” lured tourists and vacationers Up North, images of pristine forests and sparkling streams were doing the same thing — even if what they would see was neither pure nor pristine. The current Pure Michigan campaign echoes themes used by railroad and steamship companies and tourism promoters in the 1800s to entice urban dwellers, who arrived to a landscape changed dramatically by lumbering, mining and agriculture, a new study says. However, environmental devastation also helped create demand for environmental protection in the Northern Lower Peninsula and U.P. We talk to the author, who grew up in Grand Rapids, and to a historian at Northern Michigan University’s Center for U.P. Studies. By Eric Freedman. FOR ALL POINTS.

April 07, 2017 CNS Budget

April 7, 2017

To: CNS Editors

From: Perry Parks and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact Perry Parks, perryrobertparks@gmail.com, (517) 388-8627.

Here is your file:

PUBLICLANDS: DNR has been having conversations on public land ownership, especially with the counties that have a large amount of public-owned lands. We interviewed county leaders who expressed their concerns that high percentages of state lands can be a burden on their tax revenue, and revenue brought by tourism and recreation activity are not enough to offset the loss. The Legislature and the DNR are working on a bill and managed lands strategy to try to give more voice to these affected counties. We also  talk to Cheboygan and Crawford county officials, an Escanaba senator and the Townships Association  By Chao Yan. FOR CHEBOYGAN, CRAWFORD COUNTY, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, MANISTEE, HOLLAND, MARQUETTE, PETOSKEY, SAULT STE. MARIE, CADILLAC, GLADWIN, LUDINGTON, ALCONA, BAY MILLS, MONTMORENCY, ST. IGNACE & ALL POINTS. Continue reading

March 31, 2017 CNS Budget

March 31, 2017

To: CNS Editors

From: Perry Parks and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact Perry Parks, perryrobertparks@gmail.com, (517) 388-8627.

Here is your file:

CYBERATTACK: Small businesses are vulnerable to a wide variety of cyberthreats, like web-based attacks, scripting, phishing and ransomware. According to a 2016 report, 43 percent of cyberattacks target small businesses. We talk to small business development experts, people working in information companies and a nonprofit network, including ones in Traverse City and Grand Rapids. They all see the lack of awareness and knowledge among small business companies when it comes to cyberattacks. There are low-cost resources available to help small business boost its cybersecurity. By Chao Yan. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU & ALL POINTS. Continue reading

March 3, 2017 CNS Budget

March 3, 2017

To: CNS Editors

From: Perry Parks, Eric Freedman and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact Perry Parks, perryrobertparks@gmail.com, (517) 388-8627.

MICHIGAN JOURNALISM HALL OF FAME AHEAD: The annual induction dinner begins at 5 p.m. on Sunday, April 9, at MSU’s Kellogg Center. This year’s inductees are: Patricia Anstett (Detroit Free Press);  Steven Cain (South Lyon Herald/Whitmore Lake News, Grand Haven Daily Tribune, Ypsilanti Press, Detroit News and Ann Arbor News); John Gallagher (Detroit Free Press); David Gilkey (National Public Radio and Detroit Free Press); and Mary Kramer (Crain’s Detroit Business, Grand Rapids Press, Jackson Citizen Patriot, Ann Arbor News, Kalamazoo Gazette, Buffalo Courier-Express and Greenwich Time in Connecticut).

Make online reservations at http://j-school.jrn.msu.edu/halloffame/. For more information, call Kareen at 517-353-6431.

SPRING BREAK AHEAD: There will be no CNS file on Friday, March 10, because of the MSU spring break. Regular files will resume on Friday, March 17. Continue reading

Feb. 24, 2017 CNS Budget

Feb. 24, 2017

To: CNS Editors

From: Perry Parks and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact Perry Parks, perryrobertparks@gmail.com, (517) 388-8627.

SPRING BREAK AHEAD: There will be no CNS file on Friday, March 10, because of the MSU spring break. We will have a regular file next week and will resume on Friday, March 17.

Here is your file:

CITIZENOVERSIGHT: By restoring previously-abolished DEQ citizen oversight commissions, recently proposed legislation would provide what advocates view as a much-needed additional level of accountability over the state agency. Proponents argue these commissions could prevent another environmental crisis like in Flint by giving community members a voice in the decision-making process. We speak with a DEQ spokesperson, the executive director of FLOW, a sponsor from Flint, the Sierra Club conservation chair and the MCWC president. By Laina Stebbins. FOR BIG RAPIDS, LAKE COUNTY, OSCEOLA, GLADWIN, GREENVILLE, OCEANA, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS & ALL POINTS

WATERSAMPLINGBILLS: Bills in the House and Senate would tighten water sampling practices to improve detection of dangerous elements such as lead. Among the changes proposed would be to eliminate ‘preflushing’ when taking a water sample.  Opponents of the practice say running water before testing it does not match how people actually consume water day-to-day. We talk a sponsor from East Lansing, the Sierra Club and a water health expert at MSU. By Laura Bohannon. FOR ALL POINTS

AFRICANAMERICANCOMMISSION: Sen. Rick Jones has re-introduced a bill to create an African-American affairs commission focused on better serving African-Americans in the state. We talk to Jones, the chair of the Traverse City Human Rights Commission, and the president of the Metropolitan Kalamazoo Branch of the NAACP about what the bill might mean for the state’s largest minority group. By Caitlin Taylor. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU, HOLLAND, THREE RIVERS, STURGIS & ALL POINTS.

CYBERSCHOOLFUNDING: The governor’s proposed budget pledged more state money to education, but that doesn’t apply to all schools. Under Snyder’s proposal, online charter school funding would be reduced to 80 percent of the per-pupil subsidy that physical schools receive. About $22 million would be transferred from publiclly funded cyber schools to conventional brick-and-mortar institutes, a foundation grant exchange that has created controversy among Michigan educators. Officials from the Department of Education, advocacy groups and school personnel address the issue. By Isaac Constans. FOR MANISTEE, LUDINGTON, LEELANAU, TRAVERSE CITY & ALL POINTS.

BIRDINGTRAILS: The Northwest Lower Peninsula is a paradise for birdwatchers. Piping plovers, on the endangered species list, and the snowy owl nest there in the winter. The region is a stopover for thousands of birds on their way to breeding grounds. The Petoskey Regional Audubon Society, with local conservancies, plans to celebrate the launch the Sunset Coast Birding Trail later this year. Lisa Hoyt, membership director at the Petoskey Regional Chamber of Commerce, said the trail provides new opportunity to bird lovers. The trail starts in Mackinaw City and follows a coastal corridor through Emmet, Charlevoix and Antrim counties. It joins six existing trails in the Upper andLlower peninsulas, plus a new one planned for Southeast Michigan later this year. We speak with tourism and conservation officials in Petoskey and a representative from the Michigan Sea Grant. By Chao Yan. FOR PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, CHEBOYGAN, ST. IGNACE, MONTMORENCY, SAULT STE. MARIE, MARQUETTE & ALL POINTS.

VETCEMETERIES: More than 640,000 veterans live in Michigan, and nearly all are entitled to a benefit reserved for them — burial at a national cemetery with military honors. But many Michigan veterans are unaware of that benefit or many others available to them. In Michigan, burials are provided at two national cemeteries operated by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: The Great Lakes National Cemetery in Holly Township, about 15 miles south of Flint, and the Fort Custer National Cemetery in Augusta, about six miles west of Battle Creek. We talk to cemetery administrators and veterans groups around the state. By Carl Stoddard. FOR THREE RIVERS, STURGIS, GREENVILLE, HOLLAND & ALL POINTS.
w/ CEMETERY1: More than 30,000 military veterans and their spouses are interred at the Great Lakes National Cemetery in Holly Township.  Photo: Carl Stoddard/Capital News Service
w/ CEMETERY2: Volunteers place wreaths on grave markers at the Great Lakes National Cemetery in Holly Township.  Photo: Carl Stoddard/Capital News Service

COUNTYFAIRS: County fairs, which are traditional tourism and entertainment draws for 4.5 million people annually around the state, are competing for a share of $300,000 in Department of Agriculture and Rural Development grants to improve their buildings and facilities. We hear from officials at the department and from the fair in Calhoun County. By Talitha Tukura Pam. FOR GREENVILLE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS & ALL POINTS.

January 27, 2017 CNS Budget

January 27, 2017 — Week 2

To: CNS Editors

From: Perry Parks and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact Perry Parks, perryrobertparks@gmail.com, (517) 388-8627.

Here is your file:

LOCALADVOCACY: Activists and advocacy organizations have seen an increase in civic engagement in local communities since the inauguration and the women’s marches that followed. We talk to a past candidate for Kent County drain commissioner; the president of AAUW Traverse City; president of the National Organization for Women Grand Rapids; the marketing and communications director for the Women’s Resource Center of Northern Michigan in Petoskey; and  Rep. David LaGrand. By Caitlin Taylor. FOR PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, TRAVERSE CITY, CHEBOYGAN, BLISSFIELD, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, HOLLAND & ALL POINTS. Continue reading

December 2, 2016 CNS Budget

To: CNS Editors

From: David Poulson and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940 2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact David Poulson, poulsondavid@gmail.com. (517) 899-1640.

Here is your file:

STATEOFTHESTATE: The Michigan public is dissatisfied with state government’s handling of environmental issues. That’s what the latest State of the State Survey found when it asked more than 1,000 residents how they feel their state and local government officials are doing on the environment. Forty-two percent of respondents rated Gov. Snyder as “poor” in carrying out environmental responsibilities, with a 34.2 percent “poor” rating for the Legislature, 27.7 percent “poor” rating for state agencies and only 15.8 percent “poor” for local officials. We also talk to an aide to the Republican chair of the Senate Energy and Technology Committee and to the Sierra Club. Exclusive to Capital News Service. By Marie Orttenburger. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS. Continue reading

November 22, 2016 CNS Budget

To: CNS Editors

From: David Poulson and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940 2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact David Poulson, poulsondavid@gmail.com. (517) 899-1640.

Note that this is an early file for the Thanksgiving holiday. There will not be an additional file on Friday, Nov. 25, 2016.

Here is your file:

DRUNKENDRIVING: Only Montana’s drunken driving laws are worse than Michigan’s, according to Mothers Against Drunk Driving. The group wants everyone convicted of drunken driving to have an ignition interlock requiring a breath test to start their cars, sobriety check lanes and felony charges for all those arrested for driving drunk with kids in their car. We talk to prosecutors from Grand Traverse, Marquette and Emmet counties, a defense attorney from Troy and officials with MADD. By Karen Hopper Usher. FOR MARQUETTE, TRAVERSE CITY, PETOSKEY, HARBOR SPRINGS, CHEBOYGAN AND ALL POINTS..

MANDATES: Michigan is among the states required to provide the most state-mandated services with the least state funds, according to a recent national report. We talk to associations representing Michigan townships and counties and the finance manager for Petoskey who discuss how that disparity erodes local services. By Bridget Bush. FOR PETOSKEY, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS AND ALL POINTS.

STATECRASHES: A surge in Michigan car crashes and fatalities is linked to the improving economy, experts say. Between 2012 and 2015, rashes increased by about 23,000, according to the State Police. The rise to nearly 300,000 crashes is in part because young, inexperienced drivers had the funds to hit the road more often and for longer trips. By Ray Wilbur. FOR A:LL POINTS. Continue reading

Budget Nov. 18, 2016

Nov. 18, 2016

To: CNS Editors

From: David Poulson and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940 2313,pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact David Poulson, poulsondavid@gmail.com. (517) 899-1640.

Editors note: Stories next week will move Tuesday to accommodate Thanksgiving.

Here is your file:

CHINAINVESTMENT: While the presidential campaign stirred fears of job loss and outsourcing to China, efforts to bring Chinese investment to Michigan are reinvigorating manufacturing plants that have been vacant for years. Since 2011, 23 Chinese companies moved to the state, creating 3,541 jobs and investing $649.5 million in 11 cities. By Ray Wilbur. FOR CADILLAC, GRAND RAPIDS AND ALL POINTS

SMOKERS: The number of births to women who smoke while pregnant skyrocketed 18 percent from 2008 to 2014, according to a recent report by the Michigan League for Public Policy. Rates are particularly high in rural counties and also associated with lower education levels, health experts say. By Bridget Bush. FOR ALL POINTS

w/CHART1 – Rate of births by mothers who smoke during pregnancy by county.

w/MAP1 – Rate of births by mothers who smoke during pregnancy by county.

Continue reading

November 11, 2016 CNS Budget

Nov. 11, 2016

To: CNS Editors

From: David Poulson and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940 2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact David Poulson, poulsondavid@gmail.com. (517) 899-1640.

Here is your file:

RECIPES: Schools are jumping on the “eat local” movement with a raft of programs designed to put local food into cafeterias for both health and education. We talk to school officials in Gwinn and Warren and with managers of statewide programs that are spurring the movement. By Bridget Bush. FOR MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE AND ALL POINTS

NEWFLAG: Michigan may see a new state flag waving above the Capitol. A state lawmaker is proposing a commission to select a new one from contest entries after students complained about the current design that includes a coat of arms from an early fur trading company and a Latin word leftover from the Toledo war.  By Caitlin DeLuca. FOR ALL POINTS

w/NEWFLAGPHOTO: The state flag of Michigan. PC: michigan.gov

YOUTHSUICIDE: While suicides among adolescent youth are on the rise, fewer mental health beds are set aside for them. Texting and Facebook are some among treatment options. We speak to health experts in Sault Ste. Marie, the University of Michigan and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. By Karen Hopper Usher. FOR SAULT STE. MARIE, MARQUETTE AND ALL POINTS Continue reading