April 28, 2017 CNS Budget

April 28, 2017

To: CNS Editors

From: Perry Parks and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact Perry Parks, perryrobertparks@gmail.com, (517) 388-8627.

BONUS WEEK AHEAD: This is the last original file of the semester. Next week (May 5) we will move a bonus file of stories that moved previously this semester but remain timely.

SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS PACKAGES: Again this summer, CNS plans to move three packages – in June, July and August — of Michigan environmental stories in partnership with Great Lakes Echo.

Here is your file:

MAYDAYACTION: On May Day, workers and immigrants will rally to protest President Trump’s immigration policies under the slogan “Rise up.” The seven Michigan cities scheduled to participate are Detroit, Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo, Lansing, Pontiac, Battle Creek and Rochester. The action in Michigan is primarily sponsored by Michigan United. Other pro-immigrant groups are also supporting the event. By Chao Yan. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS & ALL POINTS.

Two stories on pay equity: Continue reading

Another legal lap ahead in horse pulling doping dispute?

By BEN MUIR

Capital News Service

LANSING — It has taken five years, four judges and three rounds in a lawsuit to decide a doping scandal between a state horse pulling association and one of its members.

And it’s still not over. A fourth round is possible.

Many thought it was over after a three-judge Michigan Court of Appeals panel ruled in favor of a Chippewa County man accused of breaking competition rules.

The case started in 2012 when a horse owned by David Esslin of Goetzville, then a member of the Bear Lake-based Michigan Horse Pulling Association, tested positive for an illegal substance. Esslin was fined and suspended from the association.

Esslin fought the drugging allegations by suing the association, successfully, for thousands of dollars.

The association banned Esslin after the lawsuit. Esslin wanted back in, so he took the group to court, where a Clare County Circuit Court judge ordered his reinstatement. The group appealed the reinstatement but lost that battle as well, according to court documents. Continue reading

Seed-stealing bugs threaten prairie restoration

By LIAM TIERNAN

Capital News Service

LANSING — Bugs hinder prairie restorations more than previously thought, according to research conducted at Michigan State University.

The study found that arthropods — which include insects, spiders and crustaceans — account for the majority of seeds removed from prairie restoration sites.

The study could catch a lot of attention in the prairie restoration field, said Mary Linabury, an MSU plant biology researcher who authored a study to be published in the Journal of Plant Ecology.

“In the past, I don’t believe that managers believed that arthropods had much of an impact on seed consumption,” said Linabury, who conducted the research with Lars Brudvig and Nash Turley of MSU. “This study says otherwise.” Continue reading

Assisted suicide bill introduced — again

By CHAO YAN

Capital News Service

LANSING — Earlier this month, Rep. Tom Cochran recalls, a Michigan resident approached him during a coffee hour to tell him her family was moving to Oregon.

The woman’s father suffers from cancer, and when the time is right, he wants to be able to choose to die painlessly using lethal drugs with the aid of a doctor, Cochran said.

That’s a right the man will have in Oregon that he doesn’t have in Michigan.

“Her story is tragic,” said Cochran, a Mason Democrat. “It’s a topic we need to have discussion on, and it has been around for a long time.” Continue reading

April 14, 2017 CNS Budget

April 14, 2017

To: CNS Editors

From: Perry Parks and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact Perry Parks, perryrobertparks@gmail.com, (517) 388-8627.

Here is your file:

RELIGIOUSFREEDOM: Some religious leaders are questioning the necessity of a House bill aimed at further protecting their First Amendment rights. The bill would allow ministers, clerics and other religious practitioners to refuse to marry couples who violate their religious beliefs. We talk to the bill co-sponsor from  Potterville, a youth pastor from Three Rivers, a rabbi from Kalamazoo and the executive director of a Kalamazoo LGBT resource center. By Caitlin Taylor. FOR THREE RIVERS, HOLLAND, STURGIS, LANSING CITY PULSE & ALL POINTS. Continue reading

Giving new life to road kill

By KAREN HOPPER USHER

Capital News Service

LANSING — Taxidermy is about movement.

Dead animals will never again do so much as twitch a tail feather. But it’s up to the taxidermist to make it look like an animal is suspended in action, frozen as it turns or soars or strikes.

Jonathan Wright is pretty good at it.

The 32-year-old native of Mesick is a past world champion of taxidermy and is the go-to taxidermist for the Lakeshore Museum Center in Muskegon.

“I can’t say enough good things about Jonathan Wright,” said Krista Menacher, the museum’s exhibit curator.

That relationship between Wright and the museum started in 2014 with a snowy owl road kill.

Wings of Wonder, a raptor sanctuary and rehabilitation program in Empire, and the museum sprang into action to extend the dead bird’s life in another way: through taxidermy. Continue reading

Prehistoric hunting grounds found deep in Lake Huron

 

By ERIC FREEDMAN

Capital News Service

LANSING — Deep below the chill waters of Lake Huron, scientists have found long-submerged physical evidence that prehistoric peoples systematically and strategically hunted caribou thousands of years ago.

Searching 50 miles offshore from Alpena, researchers discovered “drive lanes” — in effect, runways of death that channeled unwitting caribou into the clutches of hidden hunters — and stone hunting blinds where hunters awaited their prey.

“Caribou have a thing for linear features. They like following lines,” said scientific researcher Lisa Sonnenburg of the environmental consulting firm Stantec Consulting Inc. in Hamilton, Ontario. “Line stones up in a row and caribou will follow them. It’s something about how their brains work.”

Today, scientists and shoreline property owners pay close attention to annual fluctuations of Great Lakes water levels, but water levels between 8,350 and 9,000 years ago were unusually low, according to a newly published study by Sonnenburg and John O’Shea, the curator of Great Lakes archaeology at the University of Michigan’s Museum of Anthropological Archaeology. Continue reading

If you want to find all the cops, they’re buying all the doughnut shops

By CARL STODDARD

Capital News Service

LANSING — What started as a simple rescue mission for nine Clare police officers has turned into breakout business success.

The nine officers, who made up Clare’s entire police force, learned that a longtime bakery and doughnut shop in their hometown was about to close. So they joined forces and bought the business in 2009.

Today it is called Cops & Doughnuts and is drawing customers from all over the world. The company also has rolled out other shops, called “precincts,” in Ludington, Gaylord, Bay City and South Bend, Indiana.

This summer, a fifth precinct is expected to open in Mt. Pleasant, according to Alan “Bubba” White, vice president of the Cops & Doughnuts chain. Continue reading

March 31, 2017 CNS Budget

March 31, 2017

To: CNS Editors

From: Perry Parks and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact Perry Parks, perryrobertparks@gmail.com, (517) 388-8627.

Here is your file:

CYBERATTACK: Small businesses are vulnerable to a wide variety of cyberthreats, like web-based attacks, scripting, phishing and ransomware. According to a 2016 report, 43 percent of cyberattacks target small businesses. We talk to small business development experts, people working in information companies and a nonprofit network, including ones in Traverse City and Grand Rapids. They all see the lack of awareness and knowledge among small business companies when it comes to cyberattacks. There are low-cost resources available to help small business boost its cybersecurity. By Chao Yan. FOR GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, TRAVERSE CITY, LEELANAU & ALL POINTS. Continue reading

March 17, 2017 CNS Budget

To: CNS Editors

From: Perry Parks and Sheila Schimpf

http://news.jrn.msu.edu/capitalnewsservice/

For technical problems, contact CNS technical manager Pechulano Ali, (517) 940-2313, pechulan@msu.edu.

For other issues contact Perry Parks, perryrobertparks@gmail.com, (517) 388-8627.

FREE ENVIRONMENTAL JOURNALISM WORKSHOP: Reminder: You and your staff are invited but seats are limited. MSU’s Knight Center for Environmental Journalism will host a free all-day workshop in Grand Rapids on Saturday, April 1. The topic is “Covering the Grand River – Covering Any River” and includes presentations by experts from DNR, DEQ, Annis Water Resources Institute, Environmental Health News and the Grand Valley Metropolitan Council. It’s at Grand Valley’s L.V. Eberhard Center from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. Free lunch and free parking.  Register by email to Barb Miller at mille384.msu.edu

Here is your file:

HEALTHCAREMICHIGAN: The Michigan League for Public Policy projects that some 2.5 million people in Michigan could lose their insurance under the Republican proposal for replacing the Affordable Care Act. Advocates say the bill could be particularly devastating for low-income and disabled populations in Michigan. State health officials say they are still trying to convince federal authorities that the Healthy Michigan initiative is worth saving. We talk to MDHHS director Nick Lyon, a former Clinton administration health official, the head of advocacy group SAIL in Marquette, and the Michigan League for Public Policy. By Isaac Constans. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE, MARQUETTE, GRAND RAPIDS, SAULT STE. MARIE, TRAVERSE CITY & ALL POINTS.

MARCHFORSCIENCE: Advocates in 10 Michigan cities plan to participate in the national “March for Science” on April 22, calling attention to the value of science and the protection of the Great Lakes. The event has taken on new urgency since Trump unveiled his first budget plan on March 16, proposing cutting Environmental Protection Agency spending by 31 percent and eliminating climate change programs and the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. March towns include Petoskey, Marquette, Sault Ste. Marie, Grand Rapids and Lansing. We talk to organizers in Petoskey, Lansing and Detroit. By Chao Yan. FOR LANSING CITY PULSE, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, MARQUETTE, SAULT STE. MARIE, PETOSKEY & ALL POINTS. Continue reading